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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you run your tires at the recommended PSI on the tire? Or do you let some air out and run them at a lower PSI?

Guy i bought the truck from ran his at 20..... He filled them to the recommended psi when i bought it. Kinda too ruff of a ride IMO. Would i be good letting some air out and running at a lower number?

Tiers are 235/75R15 Baja mt widetrack
 

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Do you run your tires at the recommended PSI on the tire? Or do you let some air out and run them at a lower PSI?

Guy i bought the truck from ran his at 20..... He filled them to the recommended psi when i bought it. Kinda too ruff of a ride IMO. Would i be good letting some air out and running at a lower number?

Tiers are 235/75R15 Baja mt widetrack
20 PSI is exactly what I ran with my 235/75R15 General Grabber AT/2's and my 97 2-dr - and at 25psi with the same tires on my 04 4-dr v6... You will loose a little bit of fuel economy and it will be a tad harder to turn at low speeds due to the increased traction, but WELL worth it in my opinion so you aren't being beat up every time you drive it.

For what it's worth, that same 97 2-dr is now on 35's, and I run them at 12psi on the street, 5psi when i'm wheeling.. haha

-Ben
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just dont want to screw up the tire's. Ill check the psi and drop it a lil at a time to see what works best. I mean the rides not horrable or anything If my wife rides with tho shes going to comlain.......I wont tho 3:)
 

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If you have never done it before, READ the side of the tire - I'm pretty certain you see wording such as maximum pressure, or maybe do not exceed.

Those are the tire manufacturers maximum acceptable pressures and not their recommendations - the tire manufacturer has no idea of what vehicle the tire will be used on, what the weight of the vehicle is, or what load the vehicle is carrying - these are what determines the recommended inflation pressure.

Now open the driver's side door and find the tire placard - note the size of the tire, the weight classification of the tire if provided, and the recommended pressure - these are the vehicle manufacturer's recommendations.

The vehicle manufacturer knows the weight of the vehicle, the load it is rated to carry, and the type of tire recommended, and can therefore be considered to have the authority to make recommendations.

Now - that recommended pressure is not "graven in stone" - and just as you can change the tire size (how much you can change it may actually depend on local law) and type, once you make those changes, you will probably need to adjust the tire pressures, a larger tire, or a tire with an increased load rating, might require marginally lower pressures, but I believe you'll find that the vehicle manufacturer's recommendation is a good starting point to ensure a compromise on ride comfort, tire life & fuel economy.
 

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My choice was based on trial and error during the winter. Too much air the vehicle tracked and had no grip. Too little and could not feel the road.

20 was the sweet spot. The tires are for a bigger vehicle and the tracker weights so little that need it less air.

The smaller the tire the higher the pressure, the bigger the less pressure. Not always the case but that is my rule of thumb.
 
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