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Discussion Starter #1
This may sound like a naive question - but - it's a serious one.

I've noticed a reluctance by some persons to share vehicle details such as the VIN/chassis number, and also that some folks when posting pictures of their cars, obscuring the license plate information.

I'm going to point out here that as long as you park your car in a publicly accessible location, such as your supermarket parking lot, then the information I'm describing above is available to any one who happens to be in that location.

US Federal requirements mandate that on a vehicle weighing 4536 kg or less the VIN be readable, through the glazing, by a person standing adjacent to the left windscreen pillar.

I will concede that vehicle identification details such as the VIN/chassis number/registration number - if shown in a picture where an illegal act was being committed, could be used to identify the vehicle and possibly apprehend the perpetrator, but, if you had those details, by themselves, what good or bad could you do with them?

What the question boils down to is this - how could you use my VIN/chassis number information to my disadvantage, if you knew it.
 

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lots of gov. employees have access to this information.
and many web sites, have policies that you are not to post personal information.
due to them being sued, if something might happen.
but in general , it's no big deal.

lots of classic cars and such have disappeared with way less exposure.
can site personal experience.
 

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This may sound like a naive question - but - it's a serious one.

I've noticed a reluctance by some persons to share vehicle details such as the VIN/chassis number, and also that some folks when posting pictures of their cars, obscuring the license plate information.

I'm going to point out here that as long as you park your car in a publicly accessible location, such as your supermarket parking lot, then the information I'm describing above is available to any one who happens to be in that location.

US Federal requirements mandate that on a vehicle weighing 4536 kg or less the VIN be readable, through the glazing, by a person standing adjacent to the left windscreen pillar.

I will concede that vehicle identification details such as the VIN/chassis number/registration number - if shown in a picture where an illegal act was being committed, could be used to identify the vehicle and possibly apprehend the perpetrator, but, if you had those details, by themselves, what good or bad could you do with them?

What the question boils down to is this - how could you use my VIN/chassis number information to my disadvantage, if you knew it.
i dont think so that anyone take advantage form your VIN number or Chassis number
 

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In the UK the VIN is not visible. With the VIN I could look up the vehicle model, colour and registration. Then I can buy or steal an identical model and fit new registration plates. Now I can park where I like - you get all my tickets. I can speed everywhere - you get all my tickets. I don't need a driving licence or insurance, ANPR equipment will show the vehicle as insured, licences and inspected - because yours is.
car cloning is becoming more common in the UK and elsewhere. There is no need to publish a full VIN to get parts info so why take the risk?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks James - this is why I asked this question - what holds true in one country may not in another - let me ask though, is the VIN just required for the lookup? What's to stop me from simply looking around to find an identical vehicle (not difficult here, and Suzukis are not that popular) and having registration plates made to match and fitting them?

Now - as far as your comment on not needing the entire VIN to get parts info goes - I've seen quite a few forum posts (not necessarily this forum) where people have had difficulty locating parts, especially for the Santana built vehicles and more often that not brake parts.

Suzuki, on their UK & European market models, did not identify the production by model years as has been done for the US which allows a US owner to request a front caliper for a 1990 SideKick, but a UK owner needs to know if he has an SE416, SE416-2, SE416-3 ....SE416-5 etc - I think there are as many as 12~15 different versions of the Vitara in Europe

Additionally - there are instances when Suzuki used one part up to a particular chassis number, and a different part from that number onward - and the changeover does not always coincide with the introduction of a new model.

Supplying the entire VIN will permit a lookup to be done on the VIN and that will provide the exact model details (right down to the engine that was fitted and the paint codes), enabling the exact part required to be determined.

If I contact the caribbean Suzuki distributor for a part quote, they WILL request the VIN or chassis number to ensure they quote for the correct part, and although I can get them to supply parts without the VIN/chassis number, I do so at my own risk as they will not accept responsibility if an incorrect part is supplied - they made this very clear to me when I was sourcing front disk parts for a Swift GTi to fit them to a Swift GLX.

Supplying the entire VIN may not be necessary, but it sure makes the process easier.
 

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This may sound like a naive question - but - it's a serious one.

I've noticed a reluctance by some persons to share vehicle details such as the VIN/chassis number, and also that some folks when posting pictures of their cars, obscuring the license plate information.

I'm going to point out here that as long as you park your car in a publicly accessible location, such as your supermarket parking lot, then the information I'm describing above is available to any one who happens to be in that location.

US Federal requirements mandate that on a vehicle weighing 4536 kg or less the VIN be readable, through the glazing, by a person standing adjacent to the left windscreen pillar.

I will concede that vehicle identification details such as the VIN/chassis number/registration number - if shown in a picture where an illegal act was being committed, could be used to identify the vehicle and possibly apprehend the perpetrator, but, if you had those details, by themselves, what good or bad could you do with them?

What the question boils down to is this - how could you use my VIN/chassis number information to my disadvantage, if you knew it.
guys i search on that and i am surprised that in many Asian countries specially in India five cars having same VIN number and but cars from different cities, how its possible?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
guys i search on that and i am surprised that in many Asian countries specially in India five cars having same VIN number and but cars from different cities, how its possible?
I'm inclined to say the only way you could get five vehicles with the same VIN is that there's a group somewhere running some sort of a car theft racket - that is no slip up.
 

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Thanks James - this is why I asked this question - what holds true in one country may not in another - let me ask though, is the VIN just required for the lookup? What's to stop me from simply looking around to find an identical vehicle (not difficult here, and Suzukis are not that popular) and having registration plates made to match and fitting them?
exact part required to be determined.

If I contact the caribbean Suzuki distributor for a part quote, they WILL request the VIN or chassis number to ensure they quote for the correct part, and although I can get them to supply parts without the VIN/chassis number.
In the UK and many other countries the VIN is not externally visible. Its probably also much easier to search the web for "VIN number" or similar and then go out and steal a car to match. There isn't anything to stop someone from going to a used car dealer or similar and poking around a car on the pretext of examining it although one crime syndicate here was recently busted when a dealer got suspicious. I think that its also usual to clone a car from some distance away to avoid it being spotted by someone who would recognise it as the original vehicle.
On the plus side these vehicles are often used as pool cars for criminal gangs and a Suzuki probably isn't going to be their car of choice anyway. The problem here is made worse because a gang stole 100,000 blank registration documents from the licensing authority a couple of years back.
Publishing your VIN on the web is very different to giving it to a main dealer.
 
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