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Discussion Starter #1
is there anyone out there who's done the weber conversion and can post some pix of the vacuum lines. just want to make sure i plugged the right ones and routed the ones i need to use.
thanks
 

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which webber are you using? are you using the top draft or side draft carb? how many throttlebodies are you using? Are you using the stock intake manifold?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
which webber are you using? are you using the top draft or side draft carb? how many throttlebodies are you using? Are you using the stock intake manifold?
using a 32/36 top draft two barrel. i have the adapter plates on the stock intake with lots of vacuum lines left to plug. not sure i got all of em plugged right cuz it doesn't want to start. i'll have to take pics later today...
 

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weber install

It is really simple.

Plug ALL vacuum lines on the intake itself. There are one or two that are connected to a tannish brown piece that is a heat-activated valve. Those only need removing as the thing they plug into does not pass gasses from the intake manifold.

Route the vacuum advance from the distributor to the port on the side of the carburator near the base.

The End.

Eventually, you can drill out the ports, thread the holes with a pipe threader then screw brass plugs in their place but this requires you to remove the intake so you can clean out the metal shavings before reinstalling.

... and yes, I have a DGAV 32/36 on my 1.6 8-valve.

I hope that this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It is really simple.

Plug ALL vacuum lines on the intake itself. There are one or two that are connected to a tannish brown piece that is a heat-activated valve. Those only need removing as the thing they plug into does not pass gasses from the intake manifold.

Route the vacuum advance from the distributor to the port on the side of the carburator near the base.

The End.

Eventually, you can drill out the ports, thread the holes with a pipe threader then screw brass plugs in their place but this requires you to remove the intake so you can clean out the metal shavings before reinstalling.

... and yes, I have a DGAV 32/36 on my 1.6 8-valve.

I hope that this helps!
did you end up plugging the vapor canister return line?
there's a large port on the front side of the intake that's like 1/4", that one's plugged as well or run the vapor return line from it?

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don't plug the vapor return on the tank or you end up drawing a vacuum on the tank which restricts the fuel flow as you draw more and more fuel out.
 

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did you end up plugging the vapor canister return line?
there's a large port on the front side of the intake that's like 1/4", that one's plugged as well or run the vapor return line from it?

thanks
I probably need to go out tomorrow and take a look to be sure, but I think I deleted the vapor canister altogether.

I DID connect the other fuel inlet port that is opposite of the main input to the fuel return line. There is probably a brass plug there on yours. I went to an import car repair shop and purchased a metric barbed fitting then installed a fuel hose from that port to the return fuel line. This setup reduced the overpressuring that I encountered. I was replacing inlet hoses every six months after they developed cracks under pressure.

I run an electric fuel pump (1.6 8 valve does not have a mechanical fuel pump) and even regulated at 1.5 pounds, the fuel pressure really built up before I installed the return line.

Oh and don't forget - the Smog Nazis take a dim view of mucking with the intake system in some jurisdictions unless this is a trailer-queen truck.
 

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there are still certain counties in washington that you can get away without smog checks. (Lucky) If your vapor canister works, keep it hooked up. The webbers don't use the fuel vapor for cold starts like the stock samurai carb, but it does filter the fuel vapor through the charcoal. Without the canister it can get to smelling like gasoline. It's not real noticeable with the top off, but with it on you can smell it.
Some people have busted valves inside their can and the thing is just a useless POS at that point. There are definitely smaller, less obtrusive charcoal filters if yours isn't working.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
there are still certain counties in washington that you can get away without smog checks. (Lucky) If your vapor canister works, keep it hooked up. The webbers don't use the fuel vapor for cold starts like the stock samurai carb, but it does filter the fuel vapor through the charcoal. Without the canister it can get to smelling like gasoline. It's not real noticeable with the top off, but with it on you can smell it.
Some people have busted valves inside their can and the thing is just a useless POS at that point. There are definitely smaller, less obtrusive charcoal filters if yours isn't working.

fortunately, i live in one of those counties where smog cert is not required. i'm pretty much at that point where i'm not sure where to hook the return line back into the vapor canister. there's one that hooked into the intake towards the middle/passenger side and the return line that was plugged into some valve/sensor on the old carb above the water pump.

what psi rating is the stock mechanical fuel pump at on a 1.3l? i may have to run the return line like ack was saying.

right now, it won't start. not sure if the carb is flooding or something else is going on. i got the carb from a local mechanic shop and got all the adapters from redline.
it has electric choke, where's a good ignition hot line to tap into located??
 

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the vapor canister has 3 ports (4 if you include the dump on the bottom that's open to the atmosphere) The first port is the vapor return line to the fuel tanks vapor bottle. This is the line that keeps the fuel tank at a neutral pressure. The second line is the vacuum line that goes to your intake manifold. This line pulls a vacuum in the can and actively draws fuel vapor into the can from your fuel tank so that the third line, the one that goes to the carburetor cold start solenoid can draw fuel vapor into the carburetor when doing a cold start of the vehicle. Since the weber doesn't have a cold start fuel vapor solenoid, you don't need the manifold vacuum line or the carburetor solenoid line hooked up. You just need the fuel tank vapor return line hooked up. Thats the line on the right side.

as for the mechanical fuel pump. It already has a fuel return line on the pump. There are three lines on the mechanical pump. One is a supply for the fuel pump from the tank, the other is a fuel return line to the tank, and the 3rd line is a supply line for the carburetor from the pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
the vapor canister has 3 ports (4 if you include the dump on the bottom that's open to the atmosphere) The first port is the vapor return line to the fuel tanks vapor bottle. This is the line that keeps the fuel tank at a neutral pressure. The second line is the vacuum line that goes to your intake manifold. This line pulls a vacuum in the can and actively draws fuel vapor into the can from your fuel tank so that the third line, the one that goes to the carburetor cold start solenoid can draw fuel vapor into the carburetor when doing a cold start of the vehicle. Since the weber doesn't have a cold start fuel vapor solenoid, you don't need the manifold vacuum line or the carburetor solenoid line hooked up. You just need the fuel tank vapor return line hooked up. Thats the line on the right side.

as for the mechanical fuel pump. It already has a fuel return line on the pump. There are three lines on the mechanical pump. One is a supply for the fuel pump from the tank, the other is a fuel return line to the tank, and the 3rd line is a supply line for the carburetor from the pump.
ok, its getting clearer now. when u mean the vapor return line on the right side, ur talking about the side closest to the engine or closest to the battery? the other two i can plug. i'll do that tomorrow after work.

any good ideas on an ignition switched hot lead for tapping in the electric choke?? i was going to use one of the plugs to old carb sensors that comes off the back of the alt. but not sure which.
 

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on the charcoal cannister, the side closest to the engine is the vapor return to the fuel tank.

on the fuel pump, the hose closest to the firewall is the supply hose, the hose next to it is the return hose to the tank. The hose pointing to the front of the vehicle is the supply hose for your carb.

I had the thermal choke model, but I did run an electric pump for a while. I can't remember which of the connecters I tapped into, but one of those un-used carburetor connectors is hot with the ignition and I just used a spade crimp on the wire and slid it into the slot. Get a meter and start testing them with the ignition in the on position. Then turn the ignition off and see which ones still have +12v and which ones went out.
 
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