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On a Jimny ECU it isn't possible for it to work the way that they claim it does.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hey rhinoman...can you explain further?
why won't it work with a Jimny ECU?
i saw in their website that they have a chip for a Jimny 2010 model...
 

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Volo Chip

I've never heard of a chip that can do what Volo says theirs do... to catch "on the fly" the value that the ECU is sending to the engine and replacing it with another... It sound almost too good to be true... and all that for a very cheap price... makes me suspicious.

I just send an email to them asking for details... how does it work and what happens if you choose to remove the chip afterwards... I don't think they are rewriting the ECU mapping but better to be sure because replacing a damaged ECU is expensive.

Anyway... if they give me an answer, I'll post it.
 

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I've yet to see a Suzuki ECU that allowed reflashing via an OBD2 protocol. On the Jimnys that I've worked with you need to short two pins on the connector then power the ECU up. In that mode you can run a bootloader to reflash the memory but the vehicle cannot run in that mode. After flashing you need to remove the shorting link and then restart, the change to the mapping is permanent.
10bhp increase on a Jimny just through a remap isn't going to happen anyway.
What year is your Jimny? as you are in the UAE your ECU may not even be OBD2.
 

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Volo's answer

Here the answer received from Volo:


"The Volo Chip reads the ECU and only the ECU's calculated fuel delivery and timing values are altered within the temporary memory of the ECU. If you remove the chip, all settings will be back to factory.

Kevin
Sales & Installation
www.VoloPerformance.com"


Sound like it may be an experiment worth doing for 90 bucks... any volunteer?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
hehehe....exactly ctortolini...any volunteers??

hey rhinoman, based on Volo's reply on ctortolini's post...do u think there's a chance that it would work?
 

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First off I have done ZERO research and know nothing about Volo. However, I know that 95% of the "chips" out there are bogus. They basically are a 10 cent resistor in a box to fool your car's ECU to think the air coming into the engine is colder than what it is. The ECU then puts out a richer mixture into you engine as you can burn more gas with cold (more dense) air compared to warmer air. Problem is that the air is not really as cold as the car now is fooled to believe it is so you really can't burn the extra fuel efficiently. By what I've read the gains using this common practice of bogus "chip" makers is rather dubious and you can screw things up such as your sensors and catalytic converters by constantly running a mixture that is too rich for conditions.

Do your research before you buy or you may only end up with lower gas mileage and more frequent tune ups and repairs instead of any real performance gains.

I put a chip in my GS400 Lexus but it cost around $600 along with the new free flowing air intake. If I recall correctly, the real chips out there were all in similar price range. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is at under $100...
 

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You can alter the ECU's output signal with an onboard hardwired chip, but you can't change the Map itself. That's hard coded and can only be changed by re-flashing the ECU. A proper reprogrammer will change The actual maps encoded in the ECU so that the ECU can operate the vehicle safely and efficiently.

Like Suzuki Pilot mentioned, changing your system like the VOLO does will dammage your engine. You're not remaping, you're tricking the ECU into thinking the conditions are different, or you're fudging the output signal and then your sensors return signals are not going to corespond with the output of the ECU. Also The calculated HP gains you will get on your Jimny are bogus. If you check their little calculator, they give 10hp and 8.753 (ftlbs? NM?) torque increase to everything from a 55hp vehicle to a 125hp vehicle. That's not physically possible. With a small displacement, low HP engine like this, you would be lucky to get 2 or 3 extra ponies with a timing remap and fuel mixture change.
 

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Here is what you will typically find in the "chip" boxes for most of the inexpensive <$300 units. I overestimated the cost on my post at 10 cents. I guess they cost closer to 3 cents! LOL. Here is one dissected:



My smog check is due (dang, 2 years came by fast) and I forgot exactly what I did on my chip installation. So I just went out to take a peak and see how much time it will take me to remove and reinstall my kit to do smog. Out of curiosity I opened up my chip box to see what was inside while I was at it. I would have been ticked to only find a 3c resistor inside! LOL. Here is a photo of it opened up. There are 6 leads going or coming from the ECU into the box. I think I will buy a connector so I can easily unplug and bypass the box in the future. I originally soldered all the connections. Reinstalling the stock air intake box back in should not take too long. I'm tempted to just try doing smog with the ECU chip in there. The Lexus burns so clean that on the last smog check it was not barely registering any pollutants. I'm guessing even with the chip inside it should still easily pass. The chip box is hidden in the ECU box so nobody would ever see it.



The Guts: Doesn't look like a bunch of $$$ in parts but at least there is something of substance inside. The large chip is a 8-bit CMOS Flash RISC CPU and costs about $7. The Maxim chip next to it is a 10-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and a precision output amplifier which costs about $5. The UA7805C is a voltage regulator that costs about $1. There is also a 12MHz crystal oscillators which is about $1. There are also about a dozen surface mount resistors. So maybe $15-20 in parts is my guess. I didn't look at the back side of the circuit board to see if there was anything there. It looks like the parts are parts that can actually alter the ECU intelligently. Given the relatively low volume in sales, as you have to custom design / program the chips to the specific ECU of the specific car model, most of the cost is due to R&D and not parts. But as you can see, there is much more than just a 3c resistor in the box!



The stock 1999 GS400 has a 300Hp engine. The chip and free flowing intake gives it an extra 30HP (looks like that translated to an extra 25HP at the wheels per the dyno chart.) Like Baratcus said, a claim of an extra 10HP for a 55 HP motor seems high. That's almost a 20% increase in power. On the Lexus with a 300HP V8 with both a chip and intake upgrade the improvement was only 10% in power with the SRT kit.

Swift Racing Technologies - High Flow Intake System with Race ECU

UPDATE: Spoke with SRT tech. Need to pull out the chip box too. With the stock airbox the car will run like crap and trip the check engine lights if the chip box is not bypassed. Oh well, off to the electronics store to buy a high quality 6 pin connector...
 

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That is different from the Volo chip which claims to modify the fuelling using the OBD2 port. Out of curiosity, how is that box meant to be wired? its obviously meant to modify the characteristics of one of the sensors but which one?
Incidently they didn't need the Maxim chip or the crystal so I expect they're just there to make it look more complicated - either that or they're not very good at electronic design.
 

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I can barely figure out what reisitors to use with LEDs for proper voltage so I'm talking a little out of my rear here. Most cheap "chips" only have two leads coming out of a box which connects inline between the cold air intake sensor. The SRT has 6 leads so based on their description of what their fuel computer does, my guess if that it is connecting to the power, ground, tach, and something regulating the fuel air mixture. I think the directions only told you what color wires needed to be spliced vs the function of each wire. Here is their description of their chip.

".... (Advanced Air Flow Computer). The AAFC wires inline with the factory wiring harness and modifies the Air to Fuel ratio throughout the entire RPM and Load range of the car. It has 350 points of adjustment, the result: superior consistent performance gains with crisper throttle response, better fuel economy and no check engine lights."

While the new intake and chip did make the car sound great and more perky when you stomp on it, it didn't help with MPG. Then again it is an 11 year old car that stock can do 0-60 in mid 5 seconds. So 15 mpg is about tops driving in the city. :( But it is fun to drive! :)
 

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Its probably in line with the IAT, modifying the input signal. Most of these devices richen the mixture which makes it feel a bit faster, in reality must vehicles run a little rich at full load anyway so they don't add any top end power and may actually lose a little, the rich running spoils the mpg a bit too.
 

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I dismissed Volo as a scam so didn't bother to look at their web site until now. In concept what they are saying and the method they are doing it by appears possible with the limited reading I've done. For $90 it sound a bit too good to be true but keeping in mind the cost of the electronics is very low, $90 still makes them a nice profit on the hardware. The one thing that makes me very suspicious is that they appear to have a chip for every imaginable car. It's a lot of time consuming work to make custom fuel maps. I don't see how they can do that for so many models as each are different. Therefore, I would guess they are doing something more generic than specific with their device.

With older cars it was often easy to get more power with generic mods. Bolt on a new manifold, a big 4 barrel carb, some headers, and you were good to go. However, most cars now are very well tuned to extract the most power from the motor while being fuel efficient. So I'm skeptical of any generic devices claiming to boost power and/or MPG.

Volo has a 30 day return policy. May be worth a try. Use your credit card to buy it so if they don't return your money you can do a charge back. Interested to see if anyone gives it a try and the results they get. There are some very accurate iPhone and Android apps to record your 0-60, 1/4 mile, etc time. I'd do several runs before and then after to see what happens. (Use same conditions such as location and temperature so results are meaningful. Going only off the seat of your pants feeling won't tell you anything.)They claim it may take up to 120 miles for the ECU to accept the Volo new mapping so keep that in mind.
 

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I dismissed Volo as a scam so didn't bother to look at their web site until now. In concept what they are saying and the method they are doing it by appears possible with the limited reading I've done. For $90 it sound a bit too good to be true but keeping in mind the cost of the electronics is very low, $90 still makes them a nice profit on the hardware. The one thing that makes me very suspicious is that they appear to have a chip for every imaginable car. It's a lot of time consuming work to make custom fuel maps. I don't see how they can do that for so many models as each are different. Therefore, I would guess they are doing something more generic than specific with their device.

With older cars it was often easy to get more power with generic mods. Bolt on a new manifold, a big 4 barrel carb, some headers, and you were good to go. However, most cars now are very well tuned to extract the most power from the motor while being fuel efficient. So I'm skeptical of any generic devices claiming to boost power and/or MPG.

Volo has a 30 day return policy. May be worth a try. Use your credit card to buy it so if they don't return your money you can do a charge back. Interested to see if anyone gives it a try and the results they get. There are some very accurate iPhone and Android apps to record your 0-60, 1/4 mile, etc time. I'd do several runs before and then after to see what happens. (Use same conditions such as location and temperature so results are meaningful. Going only off the seat of your pants feeling won't tell you anything.)They claim it may take up to 120 miles for the ECU to accept the Volo new mapping so keep that in mind.
But what can you change using the diagnostic link without using a bootloader?
I think that the only thing that you need to do is to hook it up and monitor the serial port to see what data, if any, is exchanged between the ECU and the Volo chip.
 
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