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Discussion Starter #1
My daughter has recently bought a 2013 Swift and it is losing/using oil.. Took it to a Suzuki dealer and they found no leaks and that there was no excessive discharge via the exhaust. They said that they could do a "consumption test". Can anyone advise me about this test or does anyone have an idea what might be going on? They changed her oil to the correct recommendation and then implied an engine rebuild was next. It has done only 60,000 kms
 

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First line of testing would be a
  • compression test (dry then wet), followed by a
  • Leak Down test.
... Philip
 

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Thanks Philip. We.ll start with the compression test. Can you tell me more about a leakdown test please. That is a new one for me. Ill report back on the compressions tests when i can get them done. Thanks again. Andrew
 

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A leakdown test is not the be all and end all of all tests.

What a leakdown test shows is the difference between a known leak an an unknown leak.

It uses 2 gauges. between the two gauges there is a tiny hole drilled , this is the known leak, any unknown leak will show up on the second gauge.

The problem with a leakdown tester is that quite often it will report a good test although there is a problem. A leakdown tester is good for locating where the leak is coming from when its a valve , or blowby past pistons , or a head gasket , by listening to where the leak is coming from.

Quite often both top and second compression rings will be in perfect condition and a leakdown tester will say everything is fine , yet a sludge has carbon fouled the lower oil control ring.

Does the service history reflect it has had oil changes every 7500 kms? a 15-20000 km oil change interval destroys these engines very fast. in the earlier rs415 (05-7/07) the service book had intervals at 15000 kms , many engines died some at 40-50000 kms, after that they changed it to 7500 km intervals.

good indications of a well serviced engine can be found firstly on the dipstick to see if there is any discolouration , secondly the oil cap , other methods will require removal of the tappet cover to check if there is any sludge and or serious discolouration of the static components in the head and/or sludge buildup and finally the sump to be removed to check condition of the oil pickup tube strainer.
 

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Is this a K14 engine?
My thoughts - With the quality of engine oils today, any newer petrol engine would be able to see 15~20K km on one lot of oil without problems.
A 2103 with 60K Kms = ~15K km per year, normal use, one oil change per year would be fine.
Even toyota bought out 20K km service on their diesels, but their new engines with different pistons allowed too much to be burnt and the oil level light would come on so they reduced it, to stop the light coming on, not because of the oil failing.
Their 5.7 litre V8 petrol is 15000
Some trucks are going 100,000 kms.

I would get the engine up to full operating temperature, by driving for at least half an hour, (as the water temp is not an indication of operation temp of the oil) then get someone to drive in 2nd gear from 10km/hr and floor it till 85km/hr while you are following them and watch the exhaust, then when they reach redline, back off completely and watch again and see if you can pickup oil smoke either way. (Smoke while decelerating usually means leakage past valve stem seals)

EGR valves are responsible for feeding carbon back into the engine, and in my opinion are a major cause of engine wear and problems today. If your EGR is stuck partially open, then this is happening all the time.
What has happened to your engine, who knows, but it should be good for 250K kms easy.
I run mine on 5w-30 Castrol, but haven't checked for oil use, only have 17K kms on it and change every 10 ish.
Good luck, but don't rush into a rebuild to hastily..........
Also when checking oil, do the usual by the book, whatever it says as a guide, engine hot, stopped for 5 minutes or whatever, and adjust your oil level to suit.
Once it is where you want it, then check it in the morning when dead cold, before cranking, parked on LEVEL concrete, in the same place every time. Doesn't matter if it's high on the dip stick, as it has all drained into the pan, take a pic with your phone and document it every week over 6 months and see what you come up with.
I'd better go and check mine!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the post 100 ts. Your advice resonates with what is going on. My daughter has had trouble finding someone who is interested in finding out what is wrong. They only seem interested in swapping out the motor.
Through friends and relatives we have now found someone who has given us some confidence. Will report back when they have had a look. Thanks again
 
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