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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm new to this forum, after just having purchased a 2009 SX4 AWD in St. John's, Newfoundland. Great car in most respects. Couple of concerns, however, that I would love to address:
1. car revs to over 2000 rpm for 2-3 seconds when initially started cold and about 1500 rpm when warm. Obviously, this is very detrimental to engine life, especially with the winter upcoming.
2. car holds rpm in between gear changes. This is needless and wastes gas.

ANY help or advice in these areas would be appreciated!
 

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Mine goes to about the same rpm on a cold start. I agree with you on the excessive wear this will eventually cause. Unfortunately, I don't think this can be remedied in this computer controlled age. No adjustments are possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the responses. Sorry I wasn't quite clear. The problem is the initial revving for 2 seconds. It settles back to about 1500 for probably about 30 seconds and then settles to about 800 until car is turned off and the cycle repeats. I do fear that it is "computer controlled", as was mentioned. My dealer told me that today when I made an appt. to have problem investigated on Sept. 1.

I'll also be putting in synthetic oil on Sept. 1 to help mitigate the damage (I use it anyway in my other vehicle - Chevy HHR SS). If anyone out there has any suggestions or contacts I would really appreciate it. My feeling is that we as owners and drivers must have the ability to address and modify problems and features of our vehicle without being dictated to by the manufacturer in the form of "computer controlled" settings.

Another related beef I have is that the air conditioning comes on everytime "Defrost" is selected. Does Suzuki (and most other manufacturers) feel they know better than the drivers regarding basic climate control settings? Stay tuned for another thread about this particular beef.

Other than that, love the vehicle!
 

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You might want to do a little web searching on synthetic oil and engine break in. I don't know if you want to put synthetic before it's broken in.
 

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Every vehicle we've owned the last 20 years or so brings on the AC compressor when defrost is selected. That's how the moisture is removed from the air.....
 

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No worries.
The colder the engine is, the longer the idle speed will remain higher and the fuel mixtures richer. This is a necessity to achieve smooth operation until normal operating temperature is reached.
As to the AC coming on when defrost is selected, bobojay is right on the spot.

sam
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks again for the replies. Regarding the break-in, I'm quite comfortable with synthetic after 2600 km (present mileage). I think the break-in period is essentially over. In any event, synthetic is probably good at any time. My Chev HHR SS had it from the manufacturer (as does Corvette, Porsche, etc.).

I realize that AC removes moisture from the air, but my point was that it should be my choice when I need this done. Many times I simply want the air blowing on the windshield (defrost) to assist minimally in keeping it clear. AC uses more fuel and saps a small degree of power. I've heard it said that manufacturers have AC linked with defrost to ensure that the AC is used in the winter in order to avoid warranty claims.

The revving I'm referring to is the initial 2 seconds of over-revving (+2000 rpm) after a start, not the necessary rich mixture 1200-1500 revving for a minute or so after the start. In my opinion, it's unnecessary and I would suspect it may compromise engine life for those of us planning on keeping our SX4 for 200,000 + km.

I'll let you know what the dealer says on Tuesday after my first service check. I'm sure the words "everything is controlled by the computer" will crop up.
 

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Your SX4 is actually a car still clinging to quite a few driver-controlled elements, believe it or not. Try driving a GM or Chrylser vehicle...even the brake lamps, horn, wipers, windows, turn signals, headlights, door locks, and interior lighting are computer controlled. You're not operating a switch, you're asking the computer for permission to ask another computer permission to operate a function. Be grateful you're driving in a car where many of the switches you see around you are actually controlling the item they say they are. I have very strong feelings about this...another time.

When the engine is cold, a very large amount of fuel is needed to start it. Internal combusion engines have always been like this, think about the choke on a carbureted vehicle...all the way back to, hell, the 30's? Cars will rev higher when they're started to establish running, then settle into an idle as low as can be accomplished smoothly as soon as possible. Every SX4 and really every other car I drive (that's a ton) does exactly what you're describing, sorry to say. To not rev a little higher would make starting very rougn and lead to more missed-starts and restarting (totally unacceptable to today's new-car owner).
As for the engine staying at a higher RPM between gears, this is because of two things:
One, cars with drive-by-wire throttles (like your SX4) need slightly earlier input from the driver to know when to drop down throttle opening to shift...letting off the gas a little earlier will make the shifts much more "normal." Basically it's just learning a new car's throttle/clutch relationship; every car is different, even different SX4's are slightly different.
Two, leaving the engine RPM slightly elevated if the car is still moving eases gear changing and protects the clutch from harsher engagement. If I was you, now I'd say "but I know how to properly match engine speed when shifting" to which I'lll say: I know, but lots of people don't, so this unfortunately is done for the greater good. There would be tons of people jerking the car mercilessly if this wasn't done...sorry. The amount of extra fuel this uses must be miniscule...automakers would be very interested in saving even a drop of fuel, since the EPA rating for the car makes a huge difference in their bottom line. They've certainly done their homework, so I'm sure they feel that's the best option.

The AC compressor is run with the defrost setting on virtually every car for the last 20 years. The evaporator (as stated above) serves as an air dryer for the air being blown across the windshield. The AC system does not make the air as cold as it would have been if the AC switch was actually "on," but just a little to remove water from the air.
Blowing humid air across an even slightly cooled windshield (cooled by the passing air) can fog the glass very quickly, leading to a significant visibility issue. The safety concern is a huge deal, if an automaker made a car that blew fog across a windshiled, they would never see the end of horrible sawsuits.
Hope this helps give a little more explaination to what the dealer will probably tell you "nope, normal operation."
~Erik~
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks zstalker - very helpful points. I especially appreciate your point concerning the car's throttle/clutch relationship. A different method of shifting is involved but unnecessary revving can be avoided between shifts.

Synthetic oil is now in the car - this should help with the initial revving spike when starting. I was of course told by the dealership that it's all computer controlled and nothing can be changed. I was especially interested in your comment: "The AC system [on defrost] does not make the air as cold as it would have been if the AC switch was actually "on," but just a little to remove water from the air." I've tried to see if this is indeed the case but results have been inconclusive. Anyway, thanks to everyone with their comments.
 
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