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Discussion Starter #1
The turning signals seems to turn on very slowly. Any ideas??
 

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describe what its doing, same for left and right?

Quite possibly a flasher relay starting to fail but more symptoms will help diagnosis
 

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you got to be kidding, they won't repair it, go buy a universal flasher relay and plug it in yourself.
 

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You may want to check the ground for the turn relay as well. I don’t know the location in the Sport - in the 1.6 it’s just above the fuse panel under the dash.
 

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A bad bulb will cause slow flashing also.
What are the odds you will have a bad bulb on two sides at the same time?
A zillion to one, but I have seen it.
I found a front bulb and a rear bulb diferent sides bad bulbs.
Just replace them all to save yourself from needing to do it again shortly.
Yes, a generic flasher.
It would be a good time to go LED's, more light is a good thing.
If you do remember to do the center brake, dash lights, interior overhead and backup lights plus a flasher for LED's.

Did both of mine and the truck, I like em!
:p


Don

^_^

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Manufacturers safety specs mandated that a blown lamp shall cause a fast flash, post about 1990. Most countries adopted this around this date as well.

If its an ancient bi metallic unit then a blown lamp will cause a slow flash, but as far as I know, these units had the "internally compensated" version that went fast if a lamp blew.
 

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Slow turnsignals

They still work, just slow. So I would check the connections, make sure tight and clean. Check grounds. Check what the battery voltage is and if the charging system is putting out the correct voltage.
 

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They still work, just slow. So I would check the connections, make sure tight and clean. Check grounds. Check what the battery voltage is and if the charging system is putting out the correct voltage.
the blinker relays do die, they are a mechanical device and have a finite life, its got to be getting towards 20-25 years old
 

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Sure, apology accepted.


Manufacturers safety specs mandated that a blown lamp shall cause a fast flash, post about 1990. Most countries adopted this around this date as well.

If its an ancient bi metallic unit then a blown lamp will cause a slow flash, but as far as I know, these units had the "internally compensated" version that went fast if a lamp blew.

To think you were saying I'd lost my memory due to age.
LOL!!

Don

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Sure, apology accepted.





To think you were saying I'd lost my memory due to age.
LOL!!

Don

^_^

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nahh, you can't lose whats already missing :p

sorry, have to get a cheap shot in where i can, you don't give me many opportunities.

the earlier blinker units used to fail slow or not flash at all if a lamp blew, thats why they came up with the internal compensation element so if a lamp failed they went faster giving the driver and others an indication there was an issue
 

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I may be totally off base with this, but if you think of the logic of how the turn signal relay works - it’s a thermal connection that ‘joins and unjoins’ according to the electrical current going through it, so that the current is broken and then connected again and again. When all bulbs are working properly, the signals flash at about 2x per second or so. When one of the bulbs burns out, there is more current going through the relay, so that the connection is formed/unformed faster. It works off the heat of the electrical current. So, logically, if your signals are going slower, it’s because of resistance somewhere in the circuit, that is causing the thermal breaking and resetting of the internal relay connections to be slower.
 

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Sorry, Your theory is in error,... When a bulb is missing the current flow is reduced, not elevated, so the thermal switch will take longer to heat...

Best to replace the old tech flasher with and electronic flasher (does not require load to flash)...
 

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Of course they can die. I'm giving him the first things to check before replacing parts. You should know if the simple things are good before running to the parts store. Like you said 20-25 years old could also be connections.
 

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Sorry, Your theory is in error,... When a bulb is missing the current flow is reduced, not elevated, so the thermal switch will take longer to heat...

Best to replace the old tech flasher with and electronic flasher (does not require load to flash)...
Hmmm....I’m no expert obviously, but if the thermal switch takes longer to heat, why does the circuit go faster, ie, the signal go on and off more quickly???
 

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Hmmm....I’m no expert obviously, but if the thermal switch takes longer to heat, why does the circuit go faster, ie, the signal go on and off more quickly???
thats the function of the "compensator" part of the relay, to detect when there is insufficient wattage applied to load the circuit correctly. non-compensated units will flash slower.
 

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Another consideration, when changing from regular bulbs to LED's, It's necessary to change to a LED flasher-
Or, add resistors to increase the resistance otherwise you will suffer the dreaded fast flashing.

The situation I described with a bad front and a rear bulb causing slow flashing was on a much older vehicle. In fact it might have been on my 59 Hillman Minx.
That throws positive ground into the picture though it didn't make the circuit work any differently than a negative ground.

That would be about 3 to 4 times older than 2013GV. :lol:

It could have been any number of old car's and trucks, my 62 Ford pickup would be the next most likely.

How's that for clarification. ;)

Don

^_^

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Another consideration, when changing from regular bulbs to LED's, It's necessary to change to a LED flasher-
Or, add resistors to increase the resistance otherwise you will suffer the dreaded fast flashing.

The situation I described with a bad front and a rear bulb causing slow flashing was on a much older vehicle. In fact it might have been on my 59 Hillman Minx.
That throws positive ground into the picture though it didn't make the circuit work any differently than a negative ground.

That would be about 3 to 4 times older than 2013GV. :lol:

It could have been any number of old car's and trucks, my 62 Ford pickup would be the next most likely.

How's that for clarification. ;)

Don

^_^

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I'm not that much younger than you Don.......;) Try getting 6V semaphore indicators to work with "normal" indicator lamps, I have!!

Was yours the "super" minx with the front engine and long bonnet (like the super snipe) or the Hillman minx with the rear engine and an attitude towards anybody that worked on them?

I'm an old fart, used to work on the hillman stinks a lot, that stupid friggin gearshift linkage, and those silly door handles on the boot/engine cover that never clipped shut properly. Hit the brakes and the cover appeared in the rear view mirror.

rear engined POS they were, glad they died off.....and the Morris Marina, austin allegro, morris 1100's and the stupid rustin princess.

anybody want a 1948 Morris 8 Series E? i have one fully restored to concourse standard for sale, part of my departed dads estate.
 

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It was the front engine, four door sedan, sort of a "mini" Chevrolet sedan of the mid 50's. :D
It was my first car, paid $35 for it and $25 for a junk yard running engine.
I would have gotten of easy (inexpensively) except the shop owner, my friends dad threw out the exhaust pipe & muffler.
A foreign parts store 10 miles away had a brand new pipe hanging on the wall, was that a great find or what.
I had to give them $75 bucks for it!!! Which was about two or three months pay for a high school kid.

Off topic?
Naw, not us. :lol:

My point to this was it was a car made previous to the agreement you mentioned, which by the way was interesting and appreciated information & how the heck did you ever pull that one out of your hat!!!
Yet another jewel.
Good job.


Don

^_^

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