Suzuki Forums banner

21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Changing the automatic transmissions for sale Fluid (ATF) in the Subaru Outback 4EAT is no harder than changing the standard engine oil. No joke.

Items required:

AT Filter (I got mine at the dealer, While you are there, pick up some of the drain plug washers if you dont already have some from changing the oil.)

A socket wrench with a 17mm head.

A drain pan to catch the oil.

The used Transmission Fluid. Five quarts should be enough. I use Mobil 1 ATF and can't say if its worth it or not. The transmission uses Dexron III/Mercon fluid. Available at any auto parts store, or even Walmart.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,135 Posts
Subaru?
this dont get it all.
our 4speed is the same, just drains the pan. not clutch
so if the fluid is bad. needs 3 successive changes. (if brown, or smells)
Dextron is downward compatible. so no need search for III

our 3sp needs the pan drop ,method, ( flood)

here is a better trick
check level hot. good.
drain the oil
measure what came out exactly
put fresh back in , exactly
reducing overfilling and the PITA that causes to zero.

a DYI comment 100%
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
[Resurrecting this post to reflect my experiences, hopefully for the benefit of another]

Changed Gear Lube in all 4 cases - Sept. 2013

* Note - I read an excellent article http://www.widman.biz/uploads/Transaxle_oil.pdf that the tranny should only use GL-4 lubes because GL-5 lubes cause slow erosion of the surface of brass/copper alloys used on the synchros. This is particularly so on high performance/highly stressed tranny's so may not be a problem on my Tracker. I added some synthetic GL-5 to give good cold weather performance. The trans case & diff's don't have any synchro's so safe to use GL-5 there.

I needed 1L of Motomaster conventional 80w90 GL-4 $7
5L of Motomaster synthetic 75w90 GL-5 $60
and 1/2 a litre of Amsoil 75w90 synthetic that I had left over from my Subaru WRX.

Tranny (1.5L) mixed 1L conventional 80w90 GL-4 & 500ml Amsoil synthetic 75w90 GL-5
Trans Case (1.7L) Motomaster 75w90 synthetic GL-5
Front Diff (1.0L) " "
Rear Diff (2.2L) " "
Total 6.4L " "

Notes:
1. Each case was drained when cold but left to drip out pretty well. I had about .9L left over so next change would only require the 1L of conventional and 5L of synthetic.

2. I don't know when the case lubes were changed last. This is the first time I changed the gear lubes since I bought the Tracker about 5 years ago. It gets less than a 1000km/yr. on it. I only use it for hunting in fall/winter and it can get to about -25C so I wanted synthetic lube and a lighter 75W winter viscosity. I tow-bar it on the highway to our hunting camp then run it about 75% of the time in 4WD, 50% of that being in 4LOW, often into 4th gear. So my transfer case and front diff gets a lot of use.

3. I made a mistake by not running the vehicle around in 4WD to warm the cases so that they drained better AND, more importantly, that some of the metal sludge that settled to the bottom of the cases to get mixed up into the lube before it was drained. The Tracker sat all winter/summer and I drained the cases without moving it. There was a significant amount of very fine powdered metal that seemed to only want to come out at the very end of the draining. This was not really noticed in the tranny or rear diff although there was a good gob of fine metal powder on the magnetic plugs. But there was a fair amount in the front diff and trans case. There's no magnet on the front diff which uses 17mm socket FILL and 19mm socket DRAIN bolt plugs. The rest are 10mm square drive plugs. A 3/8" ratchet drive is 9.5mm and will work but be careful. I used a breaker bar which had a squarer drive to break the plugs free and the 3/8"torque wrench drive to tighten.

4. I used teflon tape as per recommended on the Suzuki site to wrap the plugs (except the front diff and the Fill plug on the rear diff) because I felt it would be easier to clean off on removal. I tried to torque all the teflon'd drain plugs to 20ft.lbs as rec in the manual but never got the wrench to click before they went flush with the cases (or I chickened out). I would say 10 ft.lbs would be plenty for my drain plugs using the teflon tape. If I recall the front diff bolt plugs were 32 ft.lbs and the rear diff fill plug was 36 ft.lbs torque.

[/URL][/IMG]

5. I used the 1L squeeze bottle of lube with the tapered tip for refilling the cases! Cut the tapered tip of the squeeze bottle about 1/4" before the lip so the lip remains to help hold 3/8" clear PVC tubing onto the end. KEEP THE CAP!! I used 37" of tubing with one end notched with V's to allow the lube to come out if it was pushed up against something flat inside the fill hole. This length worked perfect for all the cases except the transfer case where it was a bit long, but workable. Slide the tubing over the tip until it kinda snaps over the lip. Careful because it doesn't hold it on very strongly. Tip the bottle upside down and squeeze steadily. I found I would have to tip up the bottle, remove the tubing, reshape the bottle to fill with air, then re-attach the tubing and squeeze again about 4 times per full bottle. When the bottle is empty, plug the end of the hose with the cap you saved from the squeeze bottle and refill the squeeze bottle again from the (economical) 5L jug. The advantage of using this method is that you can measure how much lube you should be putting in using the side of the squeeze bottle; and you can actually squeeze lube "uphill" thru the tubing. The only caution is that when you pull off the tubing you have to hold it higher than the drain hole until you plug it with the cap or reattach the bottle or it will puke lube back out the end of the open tubing.

6. I filled the front diff and tranny by running the tubing down through the engine bay. I filled the transfer case while lying underneath and running the tubing back along the tunnel. I filled the rear diff from the rear of the vehicle. I used a short bungee to help hold the tubing in place at various points ie// the back bumper. I also removed the speedo cable while I was working on the transfer case.

7. This is a sumbitch of a job, especially because I didn't lift the vehicle (to keep the cases level) and don't have a creeper. Plus... I hate the smell of gear lube. However, I like knowing what's coming out of the cases and it gives me a chance to do underbody inspections.

I hope this has been helpful for the majority of us who are driveway mechanics - often on our backs with crap falling in our eyes and limited tools or budgets to work with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
Good post.

I have to second the idea of teflon tape rather than any stronger sealants. It always seem I haven't been able to get out least one of the two plugs (drain or fill) out of every unit I have tried... It looks like someone JB welded them in... after stripping them out with a 3/8 drive. :( The ones I have gotten out, I used teflon tape on haven't leaked.

Several of my plugs (on different rigs) have been replaced with "normal" male hex drive plugs. These look aftermarket and easier to remove.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
thread revival!

thanks for the all the past posts on this... consensus seems to be teflon tape on the plugs is suitable. would the correct size crush washer work just the same? Also a bit confused on whether GL4 is required in the Xfer case. I have seen some conflicting info on other threads saying there are yellow metals in the Xfer.

Plan to tackle this service on my 'new to me' 94 LSi 8v 5sp (91K, 1 owner!) this weekend.

Also, thanks Jed for the info on the torque specs.. I was having trouble finding those. I think I'll shoot for 15-20'/lb

Lastly, is there a service manual that everyone recommends ( Haynes vs. Chiltons?)

Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,299 Posts
Lastly, is there a service manual that everyone recommends ( Haynes vs. Chiltons?)
ANYTHING other than those 2 glossy toilet paper rags.
Get a copy of the factory manual, the ones you are looking at are so incorrect its not funny.

I have never used tape on the plugs, just new washers every change.

depending on model, some cases do need a GL4, but a GL5 thats "yellow metal safe" is usually suitable, this is why you need the factory manual for your model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,306 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,835 Posts
You can search under Suzuki Sidekick, as well, as they are the same vehicle. As you’re a 94, the only change in 94 is the addition of the thermoprobe in the EGR circuit - everything else will be the same from late 1991-1994. Ranger’s link above is the cheapest I can see at the moment, as well, but I don’t know if it includes the service manual supplement that has all the electrical diagnoses. In the meantime, with the exception of some timing and sensor issues, most things in the 96 manual might be of help. It’s free online at Acks FAQS.
http://acksfaq.com/2016bp.php?urlname=http://www.acksfaq.com/HTML/trackerfsm.htm
And definitely stay away from Haynes or Chilton’s.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top