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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Okay I watched some videos on youtube and read some stuff somewhere on the forums here about flushing the tranny fluid but I have some questions on it.

Instead of running the vehicle and letting the pump push out the old fluid couldn't I pump fresh fluid in from one end and let the old stuff drain from the other? Or it simply does not work that way and I have to run it to get all the old fluid out?

Trying to do this safely as possible.

Any help would be welcomed

Thanks.


EDIT: i'm trying to do what this guy does in this video but without starting the car, I should just be able to manually pump the old stuff out and the new in. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsdPAadc9fY Would it be safer on the tranny to just unplug ignition and just crank the engine over until it all comes out?
 

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I didn't watch the video, but my general Mechanic gut experience tells me that you won't be able to pull an adequate suction through an idle trans oil pump to flow fluid at any decent rate, if at all. That or pull any fluid from the far reaches of the trans (torque converter) limiting the effectiveness of this style of oil change attempt. :(

Specifically outfitted and trained Transmission Shop personnel can do a "Power Flush", but I am not sure as to the elaborate extent of the equipment nor procedure they use. And FWIW, there are mixed reviews as to the effectiveness of power flushing, as in some circles there are thoughts that flushing displaces normally benign wear deposits out of safe hiding and into tight tolerance component areas and can actually CLOG an otherwise still serviceable filter.

Personally, I recommend dumping what is in the pan, refill / run the vehicle to circulate / mix the new fluid, and repeat the process at least one more time to sweeten the majority of the full oil charge, a few quarts at a time. It's certainly a safe way.

Also, Suzuki doesn't use the conventional oil pan filter that you way be use to routinely changing as on other vehicles, but rather a "screen" that per Service Manual recommendation, is replaced only at trans overhaul.

A side note: IF you are experiencing PROBLEMS with the trans such as lurching, slipping, poor shifts, burnt fluid as observed on the dip-stick or other maladies, then all bets are off, and you would need to consider additional repair options should a simple change not correct these issues.
 

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Okay I watched some videos on youtube and read some stuff somewhere on the forums here about flushing the tranny fluid but I have some questions on it.

Instead of running the vehicle and letting the pump push out the old fluid couldn't I pump fresh fluid in from one end and let the old stuff drain from the other? Or it simply does not work that way and I have to run it to get all the old fluid out?

Trying to do this safely as possible.

Any help would be welcomed

Thanks.


EDIT: i'm trying to do what this guy does in this video but without starting the car, I should just be able to manually pump the old stuff out and the new in. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsdPAadc9fY Would it be safer on the tranny to just unplug ignition and just crank the engine over until it all comes out?

As Max stated the best bet would be to drop the pan clean reinstall and torque pan bolts. Run for 2-4 weeks pull drain plug on pan drain and refill.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Okay I will not bother with the filter then, unless it's right at the bottom where the pan comes off. And I don't have enough money to take it to the shop so one of those methods will work.

Thanks
 

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Check the pan. If like my earlier '99 model, there is a bottom pan plug to facilitate draining.

If you DO want to remove the pan, look closely as in my model the rear cross-member needs to also be removed for pan dropping access, as I believe yours will as well. Just more effort as opposed to the drain-add-run-repeat method. If 4WD, potentially more interference to work around too.
 

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I flushed a perfect working tranny once and after 3 months I had to pay 1600 to rebuild it...
Not a good idea.
 

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How did you perform that flush? Why did you flush if it was working perfect?

I flushed a perfect working tranny once and 20 months later it's still as "perfect" as when I flushed it.

Horror stories of problems after transmission flushes abound on the internet, and many of them don't provide any significant detail as to what went on - I read many of those horror stories before flushing my transmission and concluded that many people completely neglect their transmissions until it starts to give trouble and then complain when they fail, which just might be after "flushing" a tranny that was already well on it's way to failure.

Automatic transmissions need care and attention like any other vehicle component, the life of the transmission fluid is dependent on the way the vehicle is operated, Suzuki recommends a fluid change at intervals ranging from 100,000 miles under normal driving conditions to as little as 15,000 miles under what is termed severe driving conditions.

Many of us who operate our vehicles under "severe driving conditions" aren't even aware that there is a different service schedule and that it applies to us.

For the record - the tranny in question was an AisinWarner AW4 on a Mitsubishi Pajero, essentially the same transmission as used on the GV, flushed using Mitsubishi's recommended procedures, which are very similar to that in the video and it was flushed about a year after I bought the vehicle, for two reasons - I did not know when last it had been flushed and the fluid appeared dark & dirty, which may have been for no other reason than it may have been Mitsubishi's DiaQueen which is darker than Dexron.

On the one hand, by neglecting the transmission's service schedule, you are guaranteeing the transmission will fail, on the other hand, regular fluid changes could extend the life of your transmission - it's your choice, it's your wallet.
 

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The reason for the flush was that I keep track of oil changes and stuff and this car was due for a tranny service.It was done by pros.The mechanics warned me that sometimes these flushes may damage the trannys.


Horror stories of problems after transmission flushes abound on the internet
Too bad I haven't heard any of these stories before flushing my transmission.
 

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Okay I will not bother with the filter then, unless it's right at the bottom where the pan comes off. And I don't have enough money to take it to the shop so one of those methods will work.

Thanks
I did the fluid and filter change myself.It's very easy on a GV.If you have time let the fluid run as much as possible.Even after a week there will be some dripping .Make sure you use the right fluid.The filter and gasket set it's very cheap.Make sure you buy the rubber gasket not cork !!!
 

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It was done by pros.The mechanics warned me that sometimes these flushes may damage the trannys.
So what you really needed was a fluid change, and what you had done was a flush.

By a professional.

Probably (but not necessarily) done using a "transmission flush machine" that pumps new fluid in, whilst draining old fluid out.

It may just be coincidence, but, every horror story I've come across has involved one of those machines.

Is it just coincidence that the factory service manuals specify a procedure that doesn't require anything more than a bucket, a length of hose and a funnel?

We may never know - but - I'll continue to change my fluid as necessary and follow the factory procedure.
 

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Is it just coincidence that the factory service manuals specify a procedure that doesn't require anything more than a bucket, a length of hose and a funnel?

We may never know - but - I'll continue to change my fluid as necessary and follow the factory procedure.
Doesn't the Suzuki factory manual only say to drain the fluid and refill? I don't think there's any mention of a "flush" - machine or otherwise.
 

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Doesn't the Suzuki factory manual only say to drain the fluid and refill? I don't think there's any mention of a "flush" - machine or otherwise.
I checked the Suzuki workshop manual yesterday and there is nothing more than fluid changes listed - drain via the sump plug and refill.
 
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