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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, we have a 2018 Ignis. Couple of days ago, we got a slow puncture in one of the wheels. We had a full size spare on a Suzuki alloy, so I swapped over.
And the dash shows a big bright and annoying "Service TPMS"

Is this a dealer fix, or can I do it?

Thanks very much
 

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Hi, we have a 2018 Ignis. Couple of days ago, we got a slow puncture in one of the wheels. We had a full size spare on a Suzuki alloy, so I swapped over.
And the dash shows a big bright and annoying "Service TPMS"

Is this a dealer fix, or can I do it?

Thanks very much
The reason for the light is there is no TPMS sensor in the spare, when you put original wheel back on it will be fixed
 

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Welcome to this forum.

I'd repeat Danniorn's advice. If you don't want to do that you're going to have to have the TPMS sensor for that wheel investigated - that's not necessarily a dealer fix, rather a tyre fitter fix. They run on batteries and that might have expired - always assuming one's fitted of course. You can't tell by looking at the outside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for this. I was hoping that was all it was!
Can I fit a sensor to the spare then? Would having five tyres all providing TPMS information confuse the car?
 

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Would having five tyres all providing TPMS information confuse the car?
As an educated guess, I would say no (but could be wrong), since it is an RF device, one would think stopped next to other cars with TPMS would trigger an alert. I suggest once you have 4 turning wheels with the device fitted, go for a drive without the spare so the system registers them and no warning light is there, then return the spare and see how that goes. As you drive, bumps would change the pressure readings constantly and that would be treated as active and the spare with no changes will be inactive and probably be ignored.

I now have a question though, are the sender units registered to the car's ECU at factory? If so, that means the original will only talk to the ECU and should be changed over or the punctured tyre refitted asap to avoid the light.
 

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The TPMS system monitors the four tyre positions. Therefore if you swap over the wheels or fit a spare with a TPMS valve - after driving a short distance -the system should read the tyre pressures correctly. Since it’s the wheel positions that’s being monitored -the system cannot become confused. There are several possibilities which may be causing a problem. Firstly and importantly check that the tyre pressure in the spare is above the recommended pressure for the wheel position. (A standard spare wheel should be kept at front tyre recommended pressure +10%). A tyre depot can check if a TPMS is fitted to the spare and also estimate battery life -this can be done without any dismantling. If there isn’t a TPMS fitted then you can either get one fitted or simply accept the issues when the spare is temporarily fitted. Similarity if the battery in the TPMS is flat. Unfortunately the battery is encased in the valve and cannot be replaced - it’s necessary to replace the valve module!
 

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Thanks for this. I was hoping that was all it was!
Can I fit a sensor to the spare then? Would having five tyres all providing TPMS information confuse the car?
No - the TPMS sensors "sleep" when the vehicle is parked to prolong battery life, they "wake" when the wheels start rotating - the spare in the boot will not be rotating so the TMPS sensor wont "wake".
 

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No - the TPMS sensors "sleep" when the vehicle is parked to prolong battery life, they "wake" when the wheels start rotating - the spare in the boot will not be rotating so the TMPS sensor wont "wake".
True. Also the TPMS receiver is "aimed" at the four tyres so will only pick up a signal from the four locations. Areas such as the boot well are not monitored and the system isn't affected by stray signals e.g. from nearby vehicles.

It's worth remembering that there have been issues when low pressure in a tyre has been corrected but the warning system doesn't self cancel. The advice from Suzuki is to over-inflate the tyre by around10% then drive at around 25MPH until the warning system cancels. The tyre pressure can then be reduced to the correct level.
 
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