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Discussion Starter #1
The low tyre pressure warning panel illuminated and the left hand front tyre pressure was flashing at 31 / 32 psi. All tyres were on the low-side so I inflated all to the correct pressure. With the correct 36 psi - the warning panel was still illuminated and the 36psi reading in the left front tyre was flashing. Even after driving a fair distance and switching the engine off / on - the warning remained illuminated. I then inflated the problem tyre to around 39 psi - and checked that this registered on the display. After switching the ignition off then on - the warning panel extinguished. I reset the tyre to the correct pressure and the warning panel has remained extinguished since. I've had other cars where simply correcting tyre pressure has extinguished the warning but I have read about owners needing to disconnect the battery to reset the TPMS on some cars. The Ignis handbook makes no mention of any special procedure for resetting the TPMS.
 

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You may have a TPMS that is getting tired or the battery is weak...

"TPMS sensors may last anywhere from five to 10 years. Five to six years is a more typical lifespan for older TPMS sensors". Yours are now ~12yrs

Disconnection the main battery is not an ideal solution as it resets the ECU to factory and clears the monitors, requiring the ECU to run tests that may trigger a MIL...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Apologies - title should have read 2017 Ignis - less than 2 years old. There's no problem with communication with the sensor - the display always gives the correct tyre pressures which updates quickly when a pressure is changed. The problem is that the TPMS reads the tyre pressures as correct but it's difficult to cancel an alarm condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
According to Suzuki - the warning should extinguish once the tyre pressure is corrected and the vehicle is driven for a few minutes. Occasionally the alarm system doesn't reset and if this occurs, then leave the car for half an hour or so - the wheel sensors will "go to sleep" and the system should reset when the car is next driven. If this fails - visit the dealer. Presumably the TPMS is checked and reset using a scanner with TPMS function connected to the OBD2 socket.

It would seem that resetting the TPMS alarm system can be problematic on many cars. Some cars have a reset button but on others there are several suggested remedies if the alarm fails to extinguish when tyre pressures are correct. This includes driving at over 30MPH for more than 10 minutes or disconnecting the battery for a couple of minutes. Over inflating the tyres by 10%, then correcting the pressure (as I did) seems to be a common method of resetting.

As an aside - my local tyre dealer suggested that the battery life and wheel sensor condition is checked each time a tyre is removed for repair or replacement. Not all tyre depot have the diagnostic equipment for this. The battery is sealed into the sensor so if a battery is on it's last legs - you may choose to replace the sensor as part of tyre fitting rather than have the inconvenience and cost of replacing a sensor sometime later. Personally, I'd leave a sensor until it failed because of the vagaries of estimating sensor life remaining. The point was made that sensor life is often quoted as around 5 years but this can vary quite dramatically - age is only one factor - mileage covered is also a significant factor.
 

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When a sensor goes down what happens as I would leave till all went.
 

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When a sensor goes down what happens as I would leave till all went.
you get the annoying warning light and possibly an MOT fail I believe in the UK.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A TPMS warning light is a definite MOT fail. A set of 4 new genuine Suzuki sensors fitted is around £300 and around £200 fitted if you go for a decent aftermarket brand.
 

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WOT. OMG!!!
I am forever changing remote locking batteries so Lord knows how long tyre batteries will last.
It is stupid.
The Celerio system worked off the ABS
 

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A TPMS warning light is a definite MOT fail. A set of 4 new genuine Suzuki sensors fitted is around £300 and around £200 fitted if you go for a decent aftermarket brand.
what? dismount the tyre, unscrew the stem, screw in new one and remount the tyre? who is ripping who off here? Set of 4 sensors online is about 50 quid in british money.
 

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dismount the tyre, unscrew the stem, screw in new one and remount the tyre? who is ripping who off here? Set of 4 sensors online is about 50 quid in british money.
Is that how it is done. I need pics of the sensor and valve so I can get an idea of how it screws in. I sold my bead breaker so is the bead easy to crack on the wheels? Does it have to be a set of 4?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Tyre dealers have a menu charge of between GBP 11 and 18 to fit a sensor with the wheel on the car. (remove wheel, dismount tyre, change sensor, refit tyre, inflate, balance, refit wheel and torque nuts). The Suzuki sensor is part number 43139-61M00 listed at GBP 56.80 inc Vat. So GBP300 in round numbers for a full set fitted. Good brand sensors with proper CE markings etc - Hamaton, Schrader, Huf etc retail at around GBP140 - 160 a set so GBP200 in round numbers per set fitted. Sure you can find cheap sensors - many unbranded with no approvals- but you can also find a myriad of reported issues (difficulty in pairing, poor battery life, output drift, poor accuracy etc etc). Trouble is that it's difficult to know the good from the bad and TPMS valves are something you just want to fit and have reliable service for 5 years or so.
 

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TPMS valves are something you just want to fit and have reliable service for 5 years or so.
Generally I keep my cars for a lot longer than five years some have been well over 20 in my possession so this issue is a real pain.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Mobiletron is a well respected brand - this particular sensor is dual frequency so needs to be set up with a scope. It's a bit worrying that this unit sells for around GBP36 in the UK whilst the Amazon advert works out at about GBP15! Why would anyone worry about knock down price branded parts delivered direct from China by a seller with a poor Amazon rating? As I said previously - there are shedloads of cheap TPMS sensors available! You pays your money etc etc!
 
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