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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1989 Suzuki Sidekick JX 4X4 Standard. I can't find the issue of jurking. When you reach that spot when the motor is no longer pulling nor coasting it starts jurking. You either let off the gas or give it gas. Not always but to often enough. I had a mechinic say that the butterfly in the throttle body was worn and alowing it to flutter. Three throttle bodys later and its still an issue?????? I can't find anyone who can address this problem, any ideas???
 

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Hmm...maybe give a bit more info on exactly when this happens? First, confirm that the check engine light is on with the key on, and off once the car starts. And that your spark plugs are gapped to .028" (looking at the spark plug tips is a good indication of how the car is running - rich, lean, etc).

The EGR valve is the main cause of the car bogging (assuming that this is what it is doing.) With the car idling, carefully push the diaphragm in the EGR valve forward toward the front of the engine - your car should try to stall. When you let go of the diaphragm, it should snap back strongly to its rearward position. If your car doesn't try to stall, it means that the passageways are clogged up with carbon and need to be cleaned. In any event, if you have never done this, you should. The EGR can be removed from the car, and cleaned with carb cleaner (be careful of soaking the diaphram with the carb cleaner). Make sure that all of the openings in the valve are clear, and that the diaphragm moves cleanly forward (and snaps back strongly) on the spindle that it rides on. While the EGR is off the car, also clean out the exhaust and intake ports that you see when the EGR is removed, cleaning them with carb cleaner and reaming them out as best you can. Before putting the EGR back on the car, start the car for about 2 seconds - it will rev VERY high, and blow out some more carbon for you. It will also be a good idea to throw a bottle of Techron into the gas tank, to keep the passageways clear.
Tons of info on the forum about the EGR, etc.
And just for your info, many mechanics are not really familiar with this car. It is always a good idea to do diagnostic testing, before you start throwing parts at the car in the hopes that you fix the issue!! ;)
Considering that your mechanic was a bit unfamiliar - and if he is the one that has been doing the repair on the car, you will probably want to do a compression test to verify that the engine timing has been done properly. Have you ever changed the timing belt? If so, did this mechanic do it?? Some mechanics mistakenly remove the center crank bolt on the crank pulley when replacing the belt, and then don't torque the bolt properly, leading to keyway damage on the crank snout. Just as a precaution, you may want to check that the center crank bolt is torqued to 94 ft/lbs. If you find that it is looser, it will be a good idea to remove the pulley and check to make sure you don't have keyway damage.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bex

This issue has been with me for a few years. When the throttle body was changed the issue went away for a while, so it seems the issue is related to that. The motor has been completely rebuilt, new timming belt and the egr valve and housing was cleaned, but the issue is still there. The jerking isn't always, some times there isn't an issue at all and then other times its always. I am not sure its not related to the outside tempature and conditions. I just dont know whats going on. I have a very close friend who is a mechanic and we rebuilt the motor and he made sure everyting was set according to spec and everything was cleaned. When I contacted him, he also gave me the same things to check. So where next do you think??
 

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Can you confirm that the check engine light is on with the key on and off once the car is running? When you get the bog, does the check engine light flicker (as though the ECU is picking something up)? Frankly, if a new throttle body corrected your issue, I would assume that the passages are again clogged up - have you tried the 'stall test' - pushing the EGR valve forward to see if the idle drops down and the car tries to stall?


Another possibility is the throttle position sensor, which basically advises the ECU as to your gas pedal position, so that it knows how much fuel to deliver. The TPS works with voltage, which should sweep up as the gas pedal is depressed. There is always the possibility that there is a 'dead spot' in the TPS, so that when your gas pedal hits that same position, you bog, until the gas pedal position is changed. This is something that would probably happen at a particular point, regardless of the gear that you are in.
Have you ever calibrated the TPS?? Some instruction is here, although I think that for the 89, the feeler gauge you need is .086" for the manual tranny and .094 for the auto. I'm assuming it's ok for the 89....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just finished checking the check engine light and I have never noticed it ever flicker. Tested the egr and that did as you said. I have never calibrated the tps. I don't know where you would use a feeler gage. The black box has two adjustment screws that allow rotation of the tps and three wires coming out. I did look about testing and adjusting thr tps using a volt and ohmn meter. What do you think??
 

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It might be easier to explain with the FSM instructions, posted below. The location of the throttle opener and the screw is indicated in the photo - it's at the back of the throttle body closest to the firewall. After you either apply vacuum to the throttle opener - or remove the throttle opener all together, and you put the feeler gauge at the idle stop screw - the opening depends on your tranny - as noted on the page below, you then loosen the TPS bolts, have your DVM connected to the TPS connector on C and D (blue/white and gray/yellow wires) set the DVM to ohms (on the TPS side, not the harness side) turn it all the way clockwise, and then slowly turn it counterclockwise. As you are checking for deadspots, keep turning the TPS counterclockwise, watching the ohms rise on your DVM - they should steadily go up as you are turning - no glitch, no drop in number, no hesitation, etc.
After your experiment, when you go to re-set the TPS, again turn it clockwise all the way with everything connected up as above, and start slowly turning counterclockwise. Just as your DVM begins to register ohms (on my car about 50 ohms), stop and tighten up the TPS in that position. The factory spec for this setting is 500 ohms or less - the lower the better.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks again Bex, I'm not of again until Friday so I'll make the adjustment then and let you know.
 
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