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click on the 3 dots at the top of your post, beside the post time. A dropdown box opens with edit as one of the options
 

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Discussion Starter #22
click on the 3 dots at the top of your post, beside the post time. A dropdown box opens with edit as one of the options
Thanks for this!!
 

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99 Tracker, 5 door, 2L, 4x4
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This is from my scan tool:
My BOSCH 1100 Live Data Plus scan tool showing at View Data at Idle

MIL STATUS (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) off

FUEL SYS 1 (Fuel System1 Loop Status) Open
FUEL SYS 2 (Fuel System2 Loop Status) N/A
  • The system is running OPEN loop, the ECU will not be utilizing any sensor data in this condition...
  • With the engine at 210f the ECU should be in closed loop... Why not...
 

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Discussion Starter #24
  • The system is running OPEN loop, the ECU will not be utilizing any sensor data in this condition...
  • With the engine at 210f the ECU should be in closed loop... Why not...
Well, if it runs without codes!! It used to have this code before. Now the code never come back.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
  • The system is running OPEN loop, the ECU will not be utilizing any sensor data in this condition...
  • With the engine at 210f the ECU should be in closed loop... Why not...
What is the correction to this???
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Diagnostics, need to find out what is keeping it open, live data !
Then it goes back to the above print out data?? What this scan tool can do beside this??
 

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Why dont we start by recording the fuel trims (both ST and LT) at idle, 2000 and 3000 rpm in graph mode..
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Why dont we start by recording the fuel trims (both ST and LT) at idle, 2000 and 3000 rpm in graph mode..
My scan tool does not have graph.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
I found the culprit, the header gets cracked between the third and the fourth port. The previous owners, I am not sure who they were, had alao changed the Cat to this! All have led to this situation!
 

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That looks more like a muffler than a CAT..

The cast header can be welded, Braised or nickle rod..
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Are you sure with the weld?? I talked to welders and they say it can be welded, but it will get cracked again and again.
 

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Are you sure with the weld?? I talked to welders and they say it can be welded, but it will get cracked again and again.
not if its done correctly. Cast Iron is weldable, but requires special arc rods and the item needs proper prep and pre-heating. Brazing will crack again, but if its prepped and pre heated and cooled correctly then hot welded it will take a while. Nickel based arc would be better. Cold weld method is below. Can do it hot, hot is preferable, weld at 350F straight from the oven, and wrap in a weld blanket or cover in hot sand to slow cooling and relieve stresses.

Cronatron 211 cast iron rods are the best i've found,
Heat casting to 350F minimum to bake off any impurities, let cool slowly (blanket method will do here). V-groove the joint 90 degrees, leaving a small root, 1/16" to 3/32", then grind the surface of the casting to clean up the porosity about 1/4" away from the joint. Use low heat, 60 - 80 amps for a 3/32 rod, and weld stringer beads, not more than 2 - 3 inches in length. Peen the weldment between passes, and let the casting cool between passes so you can touch it with your bare hand. The more peening during cooling, the better. Avoid weaving because it contracts the edges of the groove too much and causes cracking. I've used many different types of cast rods for repair, Ni Rod, Arctec supercast 80 and 90, Arctect cast 3, Certainium alloys, and another, Cronetron 211. Cronetron 211, as put, "the cast iron problem solver', is by far the best I've encountered in the past twelve years. Any of these electrodes will work, as long as they contain a sufficent amount of nickel. You want a rod that has a good elongation, so it doesn't allow cracking before you peen. Some electrodes are designed for hot cast welding, where temps are controlled for lengths of time, and some are more forgiving. After the joint is filled, you can grind the face reinforcement off and finish the weld repair with a needle scaler to give it a 'as cast look' which also relieves stress at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
not if its done correctly. Cast Iron is weldable, but requires special arc rods and the item needs proper prep and pre-heating. Brazing will crack again, but if its prepped and pre heated and cooled correctly then hot welded it will take a while. Nickel based arc would be better. Cold weld method is below. Can do it hot, hot is preferable, weld at 350F straight from the oven, and wrap in a weld blanket or cover in hot sand to slow cooling and relieve stresses.

Cronatron 211 cast iron rods are the best i've found,
Heat casting to 350F minimum to bake off any impurities, let cool slowly (blanket method will do here). V-groove the joint 90 degrees, leaving a small root, 1/16" to 3/32", then grind the surface of the casting to clean up the porosity about 1/4" away from the joint. Use low heat, 60 - 80 amps for a 3/32 rod, and weld stringer beads, not more than 2 - 3 inches in length. Peen the weldment between passes, and let the casting cool between passes so you can touch it with your bare hand. The more peening during cooling, the better. Avoid weaving because it contracts the edges of the groove too much and causes cracking. I've used many different types of cast rods for repair, Ni Rod, Arctec supercast 80 and 90, Arctect cast 3, Certainium alloys, and another, Cronetron 211. Cronetron 211, as put, "the cast iron problem solver', is by far the best I've encountered in the past twelve years. Any of these electrodes will work, as long as they contain a sufficent amount of nickel. You want a rod that has a good elongation, so it doesn't allow cracking before you peen. Some electrodes are designed for hot cast welding, where temps are controlled for lengths of time, and some are more forgiving. After the joint is filled, you can grind the face reinforcement off and finish the weld repair with a needle scaler to give it a 'as cast look' which also relieves stress at the same time.
Thanks for this.

Spotted VES Indonesia also use that CAT
 

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Discussion Starter #35
not if its done correctly. Cast Iron is weldable, but requires special arc rods and the item needs proper prep and pre-heating. Brazing will crack again, but if its prepped and pre heated and cooled correctly then hot welded it will take a while. Nickel based arc would be better. Cold weld method is below. Can do it hot, hot is preferable, weld at 350F straight from the oven, and wrap in a weld blanket or cover in hot sand to slow cooling and relieve stresses.

Cronatron 211 cast iron rods are the best i've found,
Heat casting to 350F minimum to bake off any impurities, let cool slowly (blanket method will do here). V-groove the joint 90 degrees, leaving a small root, 1/16" to 3/32", then grind the surface of the casting to clean up the porosity about 1/4" away from the joint. Use low heat, 60 - 80 amps for a 3/32 rod, and weld stringer beads, not more than 2 - 3 inches in length. Peen the weldment between passes, and let the casting cool between passes so you can touch it with your bare hand. The more peening during cooling, the better. Avoid weaving because it contracts the edges of the groove too much and causes cracking. I've used many different types of cast rods for repair, Ni Rod, Arctec supercast 80 and 90, Arctect cast 3, Certainium alloys, and another, Cronetron 211. Cronetron 211, as put, "the cast iron problem solver', is by far the best I've encountered in the past twelve years. Any of these electrodes will work, as long as they contain a sufficent amount of nickel. You want a rod that has a good elongation, so it doesn't allow cracking before you peen. Some electrodes are designed for hot cast welding, where temps are controlled for lengths of time, and some are more forgiving. After the joint is filled, you can grind the face reinforcement off and finish the weld repair with a needle scaler to give it a 'as cast look' which also relieves stress at the same time.
I posted your comments somewhere else and I got this reply, what do you think??: "Yes, cast iron can be welded and there is lots of information online. Most of what you read will be about static pieces that were broken. This is a piece that cracked from a bad design with stresses in the part itself. If you have it welded, check the gasket surface for flatness, before you reinstall."
 

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Manifolds do crack, and yes its probably stress related, but as long as you weld past the crack it will be fine. The crack has relieved the stress that caused it (thats why it cracked in the first place). checking for loose bolts and a flat surface is something that should be done anyway. This issue usually arises from loose manifold bolts on these, as these manifolds don't usually crack from my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Today the ECM has played on me!! Fuel system 1 closed???
 

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Today the ECM has played on me!! Fuel system 1 closed???
thats what it should do, look at coolant temp, right where it should be. The manifold crack will be screwing the fuel trims a bit, but the ECM looks like its able to handle it ok.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
thats what it should do, look at coolant temp, right where it should be. The manifold crack will be screwing the fuel trims a bit, but the ECM looks like its able to handle it ok.
The coolant is there, 207f.
 

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