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The inside of the starter get very dirty over years of use, and as a result contaminates all the contacts inside, causing internal resistance, not allowing the power from the solenoid to transfer. The fix, take your starter apart, de-grease, and clean the internals, then blow dry with compressed air, if your armature brushes are worn down, this is the time to replace them, you can get them at your Suzuki dealer for $14 each.

Putting a relay inline with the ignition gives direct 12v, and a lot of amps to the starter to overcome the "internal resistance". I did both to mine.

Just though a share that with ppl. All the Suzuki outfitters, don't want you to know the truth, so you can end up buying their clicky starter fixes.
 

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There's more than one cause for a "clicky" starter - this only addresses one - worn brushes.

Yes - most starters will build up a film of dirt & gook over the years, but since there is no actual "contact" made on those faces, there is very little increased resistance - if we were describing a supersonic jet maybe.
 

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The most common cause of the "clicky starter" is worn-out ignition switch contacts.[/b] After years of starting an unsuppressed inductive load (the starter solenoid), the switch contacts can no longer carry the (~10A) current required.

This is the worst kind of load for any switch, as it causes arcing of the contacts every time the switch is released. Bit by bit, arcing wears away at the contacts until they can no longer carry enough current to drive the solenoid. Luckily, there is still enough contact left to actuate a standard automotive relay, which needs only about 1/8th Ampere.

Installing the "clicky starter fix" is a lot easier than replacing the ignition switch. More discussion at:
http://www.suzuki-forums.com/suzuki-jimny-sierra-samurai-forum/36456-randomly-wont-start.html#post209576

Next time I have my starter out, I'm gonna give it a cleaning overhaul as discussed. New brushes and a good cleaning couldn't hurt. I don't ever want to have to walk home!
That is a matter of opinion.

If I were to list the causes I have personally witnessed for "clicking" starters, and I'm going to define that as nothing but a click when I turn the key, here's what my list would look like, starting with the most common...

1) Weak, flat or defective battery
2) Loose or dirty battery connections
3) Loose or missing ground connection to engine block
4) Loose connection at starter motor
5) Defective starter solenoid
6) Worn starter brushes

Notice I don't even have the ignition switch in the list? It's not because I haven't experienced a defective ignition switch, but because my defective igntion switch did not result in the starter going click - turn the key, dash lights came on, and there was silence, no click, no start, just dash lights.

I'm not doubting that a defective starter switch can cause a clicking starter, merely disagreeing that it is THE MOST common cause for it.

And with every one of the above "faults", I have been able to just turn the key a few more times, and get a start.

I won't debate whether installing a relay is easier than replacing the ignition switch, in my opinion replacing an ignition switch is not a complex task - depending on the vehicle, maybe three or four screws to remove the shroud, two screws for the switch itself and then you unplug it - you do know that the switch is available separately from the lock,right? - and reassemble in the reverse sequence.

Compare that to finding somewhere to mount your relay, getting down behind the exhaust manifold to reach the various connections, and then hooking up four wires.

And here is the kicker - when you're done - does it actually fix the problem?

If the cause of the click is anyone of the six items on my list, it doesn't - on a purely statistical basis your suggested fix has a 1:7 chance of solving the problem - and if we factor my "biased opinion" in to those statistics, the probability is a lot less.

Let's go back to my original point...

A clicky starter is a symptom and can have multiple causes.

Before jumping into a "clicky" starter fix that only addresses one possible cause - please be aware that there are several other reasons that your starter may be clicking and not cranking, so you need to investigate and determine the reason before implementing a repair.
 

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You all are confusing me a bit!
I have no trouble with my starter at all. I was thinking of "clickey starter fix" as an upgrade and not to "fix" a problem. I was also thinking of adding a good ground wire close to the starter to the body. I was thinking these to be easy and cheap upgrades. That might lessen chance of a problem.
Waste of time and money? Im not desperate to randomly think of something to do but thought these worthwile yet not essential.
 

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I have a clicky starter. Starter is new and shiny. All connections are tight and I have replaced battery connectors. Sometimes just cranks right up. Other times I have to work the key till it just starts. Lil on the annoying side. Battery it charged and is with in cca limits. I just can't figure it out. Do I need to add a relay? Replace the solenoid? I have a feeling I'll have to throw parts at it till its fixed.
 

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I have a clicky starter. Starter is new and shiny. All connections are tight and I have replaced battery connectors. Sometimes just cranks right up. Other times I have to work the key till it just starts. Lil on the annoying side. Battery it charged and is with in cca limits. I just can't figure it out. Do I need to add a relay? Replace the solenoid? I have a feeling I'll have to throw parts at it till its fixed.

Ahhh, the debate renews...


Historically, the "Clicky Starter Fix" has been applied when all other solutions fail:

Good grounds
Clean and tight wiring connections at the starter relay
clean and tight battery connections
Replaced starter (!)

The Clicky Starter fix addresses the degregation of the conductivity of the wire that runs from the ignition switch "Start" position to the starter relay itself. Typically this wire is more than twenty years old and has been exposed to harsh enviromental conditions - most notably water and salt at/near the starter end. Usually the failure is related to surface corrosion or oxidization on the surface of the wire - which is the part of the wire that actually conducts most of the current flow.

Since it is a difficult task to actually replace this wire completely, the next best solution is to reduce the dependence on the wire to conduct optimually by inserting a relay between the ignition switch and the starter solenoid.


As is the case with any troubleshooting, one should always determine exactly what the cause is before sinking your hard-earned cash into a solution.


Check all the electrical connections for continuity and corrosion. Jump the starter by connecting 12VDC directly to the starter solenoid input being CAREFUL by putting the transmission in neutral, setting the parking brake and keeping clear of all moving parts in the engine bay while applying 12VDC to the starter solenoid.


When everything points to a lack of current flow to the starter solenoid, it is time to consider a "Clicky Starter Fix".

Additionally, this same exact fix is commonly used when a Samurai's headlights no longer shine as bright as they should. Surface corrosion on the headlight wiring harness has reduced current flow causing the headlight to run dimmer. Two relays are used to provide a new, direct-to-the-battery (through a fuse, of course) wiring connection to each headlight through one of the original headlight plugs in the harness. This solution makes the headlights run bright again.


I hope that this helps!
 
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