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Discussion Starter #21
Update to my initial posting on 16 October 2018 and subsequent ones on this issue.

Following representations made to Suzuki UK Customer Services, Suzuki’s Technical Department then authorized my vehicle to have the modified rear beam assembly fitted under my existing warranty free of any charge.

Initially, my Suzuki dealer told me that my V.I.N (Vehicle Identification Number) was not on Suzuki’s list of cars thought to be affected, thus indicating that they are aware of this problem. I’m not 100% sure, but believe It relates to a slight misalignment in the jig when fitting the torsion beam during the manufacturing process in Hungary over a very short time period. Only a small number of cars are said to be involved.

What’s interesting is Suzuki’s Technical Department’s reference to ‘a modified rear beam assembly’. The replacement fitted to my car does look slightly different to the one that it has replaced.

Naturally, I am very pleased with Suzuki’s prompt response and the satisfactory resolution to the problem I raised with my Suzuki Vitara SZ4. I’m having new rear tyres fitted tomorrow and my dealer wants me to monitor their wear performance over the following months to verify that my problem has been eradicated.
 

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I am going through the same issue. I reported the problem back in Oct 2018. The Vitara is nearly 3 yeas old and only just done 11,000 miles. Tyre wear wasn't what I noticed. I noticed very poor handling over bumps on the rear wheels. The rear of the car would skip sideways on bumps.

Eventually a new axle has been ordered (I have been waiting 8 months so far, with various excuses).
The tyres are starting to show signs of wear on the outer edges.

Did anyone else notice the poor handling on the rear wheels and did the new axle cure it?

I'm going to guess this is a much bigger issue than Suzuki are letting on to.
 

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Hi all. Recently noticed the rear tyre wear issues on my wifes 2016 Vitara. And yes if you hit a bump or drain cover the back end does kick. My audi s3 had the same issue even if you hit standing water it would try to drag you into oncoming traffic. I got a 4 wheel alignment done best £50 I ever spent on a car, it was totally transformed. But there is no fine adjustment on the Vitara, could maybe be sorted with shims.

As for this nonsense about swapping wheels over every 6 months to counteract the wear. This would require a jack and either a spare wheel or an axle stand all of which are not supplied with this car. Also it seems to be impossible to get a suzuki jack even from suzuki themselves the one they sent out was dangerously small for the job as it only just got the car off the ground at full extension. This was returned and a third party jack from amazon was bought.
 

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I do wheel rotations every 5000 kms, don't use a spare. this is what axle stands are designed for.

just remember, the jack supplied with the vehicle (if it is a model that gets one and not a silly puncture repair kit, which are illegal here and a spare must be provided) is only for emergency use, not for maintenance tasks. Go buy a decent trolley jack from a parts shop, these are designed for this sort of thing and don't cost much. I got a 2.5 Tonne jack and 2 x 3000 kg axle stands as a pack for less than $70 here.

I highly recommend getting a spare, even if it is a "space saver" as those stupid kits are dangerous and at best are a "get you home" option and most tyre repair shops will not repair a tyre that has had that gunk blown into them.
 

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You might consider "swapping wheels over every 6 months to counteract wear" as being nonsense, but, it is a time proven practice - google "tire rotation" and see what you find.

On any vehicle with four wheels, the "steering" wheels (the front for most cars) will always travel a greater distance than the "non-steering" wheels, this is one possible cause for increased wear on pair of tires; add to that, the fact that most cars in current production are front engined, front wheel drive, and you have two more reasons to expect increased wear on the front tires.

You want reasons why tires on one side should wear more than on the other? Do you turn an equal number of left & right turns? I don't, there are twice as many lefts as there are rights on my way to work, on the way home it's about even, so on any given day, I'll turn left more often than I'll turn right. Wheels on the outside of the turn travel a greater distance than wheels on the inside of the turn.

In the final analysis, it just make sense to get the most miles out of a set of tires, but, it is your car, it is your pocket, it is your choice to rotate or not.
 

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Her trip to work and back is along the same route (55 miles daily) therefore lefts and rights even out perfectly. The tyre wear I'm noticing is across both single tyres on the rear. It is scrubbing the outside off the tyre. The difference between the inner and outer radial groove is 1.5mm and the grooves are only 95mm apart. This is prematurely ageing the tyres and there's no adjustment to counteract this. By the time the outside groove is down too 2mm the legal limit here it'll still be 3.5mm on the inside, thats rubber she's never going to be able to use.

If I presented this car to a tyre services and the front tyres were like this they would quickly tell me that the tracking is off and we can sort this by adjusting the track rod ends (easy). But the rear on this car has no such adjustment as far as I can tell, so the geometry is just plain wrong.

I don't mind and in fact prefer the fronts and rear tyres on 2wd cars to wear at different rates (driven tyres should always wear faster and as long as its even across the tyre). As it means I only have to buy two tyres at a time.

The front tyres are fine with even wear across the whole tyre. I'm not going to swap them around with the badly worn rears. Don't think it would help the handling it might stress some front components and we would end up with 4 badly worn tyres all with rubber left on we couldn't legally use on the road.
 

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Her trip to work and back is along the same route (55 miles daily) therefore lefts and rights even out perfectly. The tyre wear I'm noticing is across both single tyres on the rear. It is scrubbing the outside off the tyre. The difference between the inner and outer radial groove is 1.5mm and the grooves are only 95mm apart. This is prematurely ageing the tyres and there's no adjustment to counteract this. By the time the outside groove is down too 2mm the legal limit here it'll still be 3.5mm on the inside, thats rubber she's never going to be able to use.

If I presented this car to a tyre services and the front tyres were like this they would quickly tell me that the tracking is off and we can sort this by adjusting the track rod ends (easy). But the rear on this car has no such adjustment as far as I can tell, so the geometry is just plain wrong.

I don't mind and in fact prefer the fronts and rear tyres on 2wd cars to wear at different rates (driven tyres should always wear faster and as long as its even across the tyre). As it means I only have to buy two tyres at a time.

The front tyres are fine with even wear across the whole tyre. I'm not going to swap them around with the badly worn rears. Don't think it would help the handling it might stress some front components and we would end up with 4 badly worn tyres all with rubber left on we couldn't legally use on the road.
swap them front to rear and side to side to even out the wear, otherwise you will end up with 2 tyres that are worn and 2 that aren't. Tyre rotation is a well known and proven method of evening out wear. Even road camber plays a part in tyre wear and just because the turns equal doesn't mean the car gets the same wear on each tyre.
 

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I own a Suzuki Vitara SZ4 (F2WD) 1.6cc petrol 5 door hatchback which was first registered in the UK as new in March 2016.
Both rear tyres (Continental brand) first started to show signs of premature wear (the outer edge two grooves) at about 13,000 miles. I referred this potential problem to a Suzuki dealer when the car was being serviced but they said the tyre wear was probably due to incorrect tyre pressures (which I disputed because I always check and maintain them at 33psi as recommended by the car’s manual) and/or poor road conditions.

Subsequently, I had to renew both rear tyres at 18,000 miles due to excessive wear on the outer two grooves on both sides. My local ATS depot, which fitted replacement Continental tyres, indicated that the rear wheel alignment was out by 5mm but had no adjustment on my car to correct this error. The two front tyres were OK and did not require renewing (subsequently changed 3 months later at about 20,00 miles).

Since the rear tyre change, I have now clocked up a further 12,000 miles and the rear tyres are again indicating premature excessive wear (almost down to the limit indicator) in the same areas as before albeit within permissible limits. Current measurements are:
O/R – Inner edge two grooves 4.39mm 4.67mm / Outer edge two grooves 4.34mm 3.38mm.
N/R – Inner edge two grooves 4.47mm 4.35mm / Outer edge two grooves 4.08mm 2.68mm.
These measurements suggest significant difference in tread depth is occurring from one side of the tyre to the other.

I have done some research on the internet and discover that a rear axle on a Suzuki Vitara 2015 model was not straight and was wearing out the rear tyres after 12,000 miles. This seems to be the same problem experienced by the Suzuki Vitara’s predecessor (The Suzuki Grand Vitara) and, more recently, the Suzuki SX4 S-Cross and the Suzuki Swift.

There are also reports that suggest that some owners have had the rear axles of their cars replaced under warranty to cure the rear tyre excessive wear problem. My 3 years warranty expires 31 March 2019 and I am keen to get this situation rectified before it expires.

I have owned several front wheel drive cars in my lifetime and have never experienced rear tyres wearing out before the front tyres. Is this a known problem with some Suzuki models and have other owners had similar experiences to mine?
Hey there ,
I hope by now everything is fine with your car .I just wanted to inform you and other vitara sz4 owners
That i face the same rear axle problem with mine to.
More specifically i own the 1.6L petrol 2wd and the first clue that got me into searching the problem was the rear tire premature wear.However here in greece the dealer didnt recognise from the beginning the problem till we noticed it and told them . Luckily they finally admitted the problem and right now we are waiting an answer on weather or not they are going to replace the fault axle with a new one under warranty. Something else i would like to share is that we also a few months ago had to change the rear right spring as its K coefficient was significantly low .
I am not sure if the axle caused the spring to wear out as well .
Did someone else have to change a rear spring while having the axle problem that we are talking about ?
 

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I just had all four wheels off this last weekend. The car has its first Ministry of Transport test next month and I wanted to inspect the brake pads and I also changed the disc retaining screws for allen key type bolts. On our car, there is no noticeable abnormal tyre wear at all at 13000 miles. I used a genuine Suzuki jack and a trolley jack to raise the car and had no issues. I bought a spare wheel last year but as yet, not had to use it, but I'm glad we have it just in case.

If anyone is interested, the part number for the jack is 89913-55LV1 though as always it's your responsibility to check if you intend purchasing. They retail for about £60 here in the UK. I paid £30 for mine brand new off the famous auction site. Personally, on solid ground, I found it sturdy enough and certainly suitable for a 5 minute wheel change on tarmac.
 

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Rear tyres dying soon

I have just purchased an used vitara 1.4 turbo allgrip some months ago, 2017/2018 with 14500km. My rear tyres are wearing out too soon, and it´s worst at the outer portion of both rear tyres and with 19.000km need to be replaced.
I took the car for alignent service here in town, who detected rear axle wheels with convergence a little out of especification.
I intend to take it to a suzuki dealer inspection, and try to solve it with warranty.
I had other suzuki models but never had a problem like this.
I hope Suzuki can find the problem.
 

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Known issue

In process of buying used Vitara 2017. Noted unequal rear tyre wear, outer rim nearly down to indicator block after only 13000 miles. 3mm difference. Talked to mechanic there who cheerfully admitted they do quite a few rear axle replacements! However Suzuki stipulate a min 7mm tracking deflection? before will authorise replacement. We're awaiting this reading. So beware, seems to eat rear tyres and may affect steering.
 

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Funny you should say that...

Well I have walked away. The total toe tracking result was 6 with Suzuki's arbitrary? max of 7 not reached so 'within tolerance'. Hence no rear axle replacement.
The tyre wear difference was greater than the OP's at similar mileage. I can't see that this is anything but a fudge. The mechanic let the cat out of the bag by saying they'd done quite a few replacements. Who wants to replace rear tyres at £120 per corner every 15000m or so aside from steering issues alluded to here? I think the garage's hands are tied by Suzuki though.
Problem is I feel foolish as it's not something I really know about! You're made to feel you're making mountains out of molehills. What's a couple of mm difference eh? Grateful to the forum for this info.

But I still want a Vitara!
 

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I guess you've since bought another car, but in case you haven't, as far as looking at 2nd hand Vitara's (& S Crosses) you could look at the number stamped on the underneath of the RH leg of the rear axle. If the number starts with 17, it's a modified axle & you won't have any excessive tyre wear issues (assuming no accident damage of course!). If it starts with 15 or 16 then it is an older axle & could well have an out of spec axle.

Btw, for those who've had axle claims rejected due to the alignment not being out of spec, this isn't the only criteria that an axle can be replaced under warranty. The vast majority of the warranty axle jobs we've done have been accepted for replacements without any alignment reports, all we do is measure the tread depth across the tyre in the main grooves & photograph each measurement. Then we forward these pictures, along with 1 of the above mentioned axle number to Suzuki warranty, AFAIK the vast majority have been accepted. This is a legit procedure btw & any Suzuki dealer can do this, so I don't know why other dealers haven't!
Incidentally I don't know what the threshold for tread depth difference between inner & outer is for the claim to be accepted. Doesn't cost anything to try though!

Hope this helps.
 

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I own a Suzuki Vitara SZ4 (F2WD) 1.6cc petrol 5 door hatchback which was first registered in the UK as new in March 2016.
Both rear tyres (Continental brand) first started to show signs of premature wear (the outer edge two grooves) at about 13,000 miles. I referred this potential problem to a Suzuki dealer when the car was being serviced but they said the tyre wear was probably due to incorrect tyre pressures (which I disputed because I always check and maintain them at 33psi as recommended by the car’s manual) and/or poor road conditions.

Subsequently, I had to renew both rear tyres at 18,000 miles due to excessive wear on the outer two grooves on both sides. My local ATS depot, which fitted replacement Continental tyres, indicated that the rear wheel alignment was out by 5mm but had no adjustment on my car to correct this error. The two front tyres were OK and did not require renewing (subsequently changed 3 months later at about 20,00 miles).

Since the rear tyre change, I have now clocked up a further 12,000 miles and the rear tyres are again indicating premature excessive wear (almost down to the limit indicator) in the same areas as before albeit within permissible limits. Current measurements are:
O/R – Inner edge two grooves 4.39mm 4.67mm / Outer edge two grooves 4.34mm 3.38mm.
N/R – Inner edge two grooves 4.47mm 4.35mm / Outer edge two grooves 4.08mm 2.68mm.
These measurements suggest significant difference in tread depth is occurring from one side of the tyre to the other.

I have done some research on the internet and discover that a rear axle on a Suzuki Vitara 2015 model was not straight and was wearing out the rear tyres after 12,000 miles. This seems to be the same problem experienced by the Suzuki Vitara’s predecessor (The Suzuki Grand Vitara) and, more recently, the Suzuki SX4 S-Cross and the Suzuki Swift.

There are also reports that suggest that some owners have had the rear axles of their cars replaced under warranty to cure the rear tyre excessive wear problem. My 3 years warranty expires 31 March 2019 and I am keen to get this situation rectified before it expires.

I have owned several front wheel drive cars in my lifetime and have never experienced rear tyres wearing out before the front tyres. Is this a known problem with some Suzuki models and have other owners had similar experiences to mine?
Hi

I have Vitara S 1.4 boosterjet. Live in Finland and will got a new rear axle today under warranty. I contacted my dealer about a month ago and when they asked this issue from Suzuki there was no further questions that I couldn't get a new axle.
 
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