Suzuki Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a radiator problem with my Suzuki SX4 2010 AWD. The fluid is passing from the radiator to the reserve vessel after a 20 km journey. I have changed the cap twice and now the water pump, but the problem persists.Anybody has a solution to the problem?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,697 Posts
First, it is normal for the coolant to transfer to the expansion reservoir as the engine heats and back when it cools.
Second - are you loosing coolant - or is it that the coolant is not going back to the radiator?

The most common cause of this problem is a defective radiator cap, which you say you've already replaced, it can also be caused by a damaged neck where the cap sits, or pin hole leaks in the cooling system, which is why I asked about coolant loss.

If you're not loosing coolant, check the connections between the expansion reservoir and the radiator neck - a crack or leak (or reversed connections on the expansion reservoir - this is possible on some vehicles but not all) will allow fluid to flow outwards, but does not allow the vacuum required to "suck" the fluid back to develop.

Last - the SX4 was sold in many countries with a number of different engines - we don't know the details until you tell us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for your reply. The engine of my SX4 is 2.0L, 4 cylinder, Type J2OA (DOHC). I am losing a certain amount of coolant but I am not sure if it is overflowing from the reservoir when it fills up or for some other reason. The coolant is bubbling inside the reservoir when it fills up, if that is any indication.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,697 Posts
When is the coolant bubbling? How long after the engine starts?

Cooling systems are sealed systems and apart from venting trapped & dissolved air after a recent refill, do not usually develop bubbles. The bubbles could be air as just mentioned, or steam from coolant boiling in an overheating scenario, and it must be mentioned that a radiator cap that does not seal properly for whatever reason will allow the coolant to boil at lower temperatures than it should.

Bubbling coolant could also be a sign of a bigger issue, for example a defective head gasket - there are test kits that can be used to check the coolant for the presence of hydrocarbon contaminants to confirm or eliminate this possibility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
When is the coolant bubbling? How long after the engine starts?

Cooling systems are sealed systems and apart from venting trapped & dissolved air after a recent refill, do not usually develop bubbles. The bubbles could be air as just mentioned, or steam from coolant boiling in an overheating scenario, and it must be mentioned that a radiator cap that does not seal properly for whatever reason will allow the coolant to boil at lower temperatures than it should.

Bubbling coolant could also be a sign of a bigger issue, for example a defective head gasket - there are test kits that can be used to check the coolant for the presence of hydrocarbon contaminants to confirm or eliminate this possibility.
The bubbling seems to start when the reservoir is getting pretty full. Probably 20 minutes or so from cool to hot. Just now I transferred the coolant (already cool) .back into the radiator and after a twent minute journey the reservoir was full again and the coolant was bubbling. Ironically the engine did not seem very hot. The defective head gasket is something I will have to look into. Many thanks for your suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
898 Posts
Normally (as said in former posts from fordem) the coolant of the expansion tank would be sucked back into the engine when cooling down. A crack in the hose from radiator to expansion tank might allow stray air to be sucked back in instead of the coolant. But I do not like the "pretty full" and the "bubbling" you mention...which, as you suggested, might indicate a failed head gasket that comes usually with other symptoms though....
A bit of confusion here...2010 was the year the J20B was the normal gas engine in several countries, not the J20A as mentioned, but because of your location (Brazil?), we do not know....other gas engines and diesels were available in a lot of countries but not in North America...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Normally (as said in former posts from fordem) the coolant of the expansion tank would be sucked back into the engine when cooling down. A crack in the hose from radiator to expansion tank might allow stray air to be sucked back in instead of the coolant. But I do not like the "pretty full" and the "bubbling" you mention...which, as you suggested, might indicate a failed head gasket that comes usually with other symptoms though....
A bit of confusion here...2010 was the year the J20B was the normal gas engine in several countries, not the J20A as mentioned, but because of your location (Brazil?), we do not know....other gas engines and diesels were available in a lot of countries but not in North America...
Thank you for your observations. What would the other symptoms of a a failed head gasket be?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
898 Posts
In addition to what you already have, the temperature needle goes with erratic ups and downs, and the heater will not blow heated air in a regular way..that is some heat at times, then none at all...of course in Brazil, using the heater might not be common..but try it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,697 Posts
Failed head gaskets can manifest themselves in many different ways, depending on how & where they have failed, and given the fact that not all of them are present in a failure, I don't see much point in attempting to discuss them here.

If I experienced the symptoms that LMP has listed as relating to a failed head gasket - erratic temperature gauge movement, not blowing heated air - if I saw those on my car, I'd be investigating low coolant, and not the head gasket - of course, the low coolant could be caused by a failed head gasket, but that would be, so to speak, be the second leg of the investigation.

Let's look at your symptom - coolant bubbling into the expansion reservoir - as I mentioned earlier, they could be trapped air, steam from boiling coolant, or combustion gases leaking into the cooling system because of a failed gasket. The fact that other common symptoms (like oil/coolant cross contamination) aren't present (or haven't been mentioned) doesn't mean the gasket hasn't failed.

You need to test the coolant for the presence of hydrocarbons
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Failed head gaskets can manifest themselves in many different ways, depending on how & where they have failed, and given the fact that not all of them are present in a failure, I don't see much point in attempting to discuss them here.

If I experienced the symptoms that LMP has listed as relating to a failed head gasket - erratic temperature gauge movement, not blowing heated air - if I saw those on my car, I'd be investigating low coolant, and not the head gasket - of course, the low coolant could be caused by a failed head gasket, but that would be, so to speak, be the second leg of the investigation.

Let's look at your symptom - coolant bubbling into the expansion reservoir - as I mentioned earlier, they could be trapped air, steam from boiling coolant, or combustion gases leaking into the cooling system because of a failed gasket. The fact that other common symptoms (like oil/coolant cross contamination) aren't present (or haven't been mentioned) doesn't mean the gasket hasn't failed.

You need to test the coolant for the presence of hydrocarbons
Thank you Fordem. I will see if I can test for the presence of hydrocarbons. I am in a provincial town in Brazil and am not sure about the level of local expertise.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top