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Discussion Starter #1
2004, M13A engine, 42K.

My Jimny has developed a small leak in the exhaust system somewhere near the leading end of the CAT unit.

The pipework generally looks to be in good condition. I suspect a hole near a run of weld rather than that of general corrosion. Is the shield around the CAT likely to be difficult to remove if the leak is under it?

Any suggestions on how I might plug the leak for the MOT; I understand the use of exhaust paste is not reconmended option?

I guess there is not such thing as high temperture silicone sealant?

Thanks in advance for any practical advice you can give.:rolleyes:
 

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I suggest taking it to an exaust shop and just weld it.

About the high temp silicone, it does exist in fact, the red silicone (RTV sealant) which is used for the headers gasket.
 

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I don't think you can get a high temperature silicon sealant that is sensor safe. You should only use sensor safe sealants on an EFI engine, particularly on the exhaust!. The shield may be difficult to remove, those bolts are subject to a lot of heat and are likely to be rusted in place too.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Identifying the Parts of the Exhaust

I now realise the exhaust is beyond economic repair (not good for only 42K).

I visited a few local garages for a price to replace some or all of it.

If I could fully identify the parts I can buy cheaper on the internet and fit it myself.

The logbook says I have a M13A engine which is 1328cc (DOHC/chain drive).
The garages exhaust catalogues list the engine as G13B 1298cc (SOHC/belt drive).
Apparently both engines were used in the Jimny for a number of over-lapping years.

Problem is: Is the exhaust, especially the first part containing the CAT, one and the same or are they different for the two engines?
:rolleyes:
 

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The DOHC will be different than the SOHC engine. The DOHC is higher compression and produces more heat.

It's easy to identify the two engines. The SOHC has one lobe on top of the engine and the plugs are over on the side just above the exhaust manifold.

The DOHC engine has 2 lobes on top and the spark plugs run down the center of the engine between the two lobes.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Identifying Exhaust Parts

I know I have the M13A engine with the chain driven twin cam.

What I don't know is why the exhaust fitters’ catalogues only appear to list the exhaust for the G13B engine.

It is possible the exhaust systems are one and the same for my year.
(2004 / JLX).
I need to be sure before ordering one on the internet as suppliers websites also only list one (G13B).:rolleyes:
 

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Yeah I'd definitely check around and find out before ordering. The two engines are SO different. About the only thing in common is the 1.3L and the suzuki name. Does the suzuki dealer near you have any input? You guys still have that engine in production over there don't you?

We havn't had SJ413's here in the US for so long That a Tech at a US suzuki dealership would just look at you like bugs were crawling out your ears if you started asking questions about one.
 
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Exhaust System Nearly Sorted!

I have now identified the break in the exhaust and it will be mig welded tomorrow.
If that is not sucessful then I will visit yet another local supplier who said he would match the exhaust from the company's large stock.
He thinks that the OBD version is the one for my vehicle. (My Jimny does have a OBD socket - I have used it in the past).
Additionally they will match the cheaper internet prices and also give me back something for the old cat!

thanks for your help:)
 

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Yeah I'd definitely check around and find out before ordering. The two engines are SO different. About the only thing in common is the 1.3L and the suzuki name. Does the suzuki dealer near you have any input? You guys still have that engine in production over there don't you?

We havn't had SJ413's here in the US for so long That a Tech at a US suzuki dealership would just look at you like bugs were crawling out your ears if you started asking questions about one.

Do you think the engine block is still the same? As the displacement is perfectly identical to those older Samurais.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Jimny Exhausted!

see previous post - thanks for your interest.

I believe the two engines were both used in the same period of time - which one dependant on the body trim/variant.

I suspect it might be a case of where the vehicle was assembled - Spain or Japan, etc. Result: one of the factories run out of the older G13A before the other(s) and was then the first to switch over to the newer M13A engine???

:rolleyes:
 

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Do you think the engine block is still the same? As the displacement is perfectly identical to those older Samurais.
The G13a is the same engine that we use in the older samurais. And I think the block is the same on all versions of the G13, the submodels use different heads and components.

Something I didn't notice was that Overthetop said the other engine for his vehicle was a G13B engine which was a DOHC engine. Ran off a distributor on the cam, but it was twin cam and was an interferance engine.

The G13BA was the single overhead cam 8 valve engine with a throtle body single point fuel injection that was used in samurais and SJ413's from 1990-95

The G13BB was a single overhead cam with 16 valves and MPFI. It's used in 1998-2004 jimnys and currently still used in the Gypsy.

It sounds like the engine in the other jimnys were G13BB engines and yours was the new M class. You're probably right about them running out of the older engines as suzuki discontinued production of the G engines everywhere but india.
 
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MIG Welding the Jimny's Exhasut In-situ

It was confirmed at the w/e that my Jimny has the later and more expensive exhaust system. The main dealer price is £240 + fitting. Local exhaust centres and internet sites not much cheaper.

The weld has failed around the joint between the down pipe and the CAT casing. A welder assures me there is plenty of "meat" to enable it to be MIG welded.

I have not yet agreed to have it done because it was bought to my attention later that precautions need to be taken. IE disconnect battery, put the earth return clamp directly on the exhaust pipe and /or the fitting of a surge protection device across the battery. If not, damage could be done to the ECU and other electronics.

Have anyone had any practical experience / success with MIG welding on modern cars?:rolleyes:
 

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I have not yet agreed to have it done because it was bought to my attention later that precautions need to be taken. IE disconnect battery, put the earth return clamp directly on the exhaust pipe and /or the fitting of a surge protection device across the battery. If not, damage could be done to the ECU and other electronics.
Thats correct, big sparks means big volts and possible damage to electronics unless precautions are taken.
 

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It sounds like the engine in the other jimnys were G13BB engines and yours was the new M class. You're probably right about them running out of the older engines as suzuki discontinued production of the G engines everywhere but india.
The M13A and G13BB engines were used in Jimnys concurrently for a number of years. Generally speaking in the UK the G13BB was fitted to Spanish built Jimnys and the Japanese built vehicles used the M13A. Spanish vehicles were usually soft tops and OBD2, Japanese built vehicles were usually tin tops and were OBD1.
 

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If you're having it welded in a shop that does exhausts, then they should know how to protect the vehicle from the MIG welders voltage. If you are doing it yourself or having a friend do it, The best way to ensure the vehicle is protected and the easiest way to weld a break is to drop the exhaust off the vehicle to have it patched. It will let you get a better look at the break as well to see if there are weak areas on top of the exhaust that need reinforcing.
 

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I don't think you can get a high temperature silicon sealant that is sensor safe. You should only use sensor safe sealants on an EFI engine, particularly on the exhaust!. The shield may be difficult to remove, those bolts are subject to a lot of heat and are likely to be rusted in place too.
Correct on the sensor safe sealants, we cannot use just any type of seal on the EFI engine. Better to be on the safer side and it doesn't cost much.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
Exhaust System Has Been Welded

The exhaust was MIG welded successfully last week. Corrosion was not the problem. Area of failure was a facture where the down pipe goes into the under-floor CAT. Not an uncommon problem with Jimnys of that generation.

The battery was disconnected to protect the vehicle's electrics and the welding earth clamp was made secure to the exhaust local to the welding. Repair was given a spray coat of high temperature aluminium paint.
Everything looking good so far.

Thanks for your interest.:rolleyes:
 
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