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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I've got a 1.6 Carry flatbed drop-side truck, 2007 model built in Thailand where I now live. A year or so ago (February 2020)I had some overheating issues and 2 very wise members told me in no uncertain terms to change the radiator cap. TBH I didn't really believe it could be something that simple but for the price it was a dead simple thing to do and so I did change it. No more problems!

However, when ticking over in the market today while waiting for my wife it once again got very hot and the air-con stopped working, temperature gauge started climbing. I turned off the engine and sat in our very hot sunshine in the cab until she came back. Once again as soon we started up and got back out onto the open road again down went the temp gauge, air-con working again.

Cooled down at home, expansion bottle still got water (gave it a bit more anyway) radiator still full.

So to quote a UK BBC quiz show host - "What does the team think?" Is it likely to be a faulty pressure cap again?

This time I'll accept the answer!
 

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Overheat when stationary at idle, I'd start by verifying the fan(s) are operational - I'm not certain if that model uses a separate condenser fan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Aah - so although similar behaviour to last time you don't think it is a failed radiator cap then? I ask because all circumstances are the same including cooling down once driving, just like before. Guess I'll have to save up and take it into a garage then.
 

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I don't remember the last time, and I'm not inclined to go hunt down the posts - the symptoms you're reporting now don't point to a failed radiator cap.

A failed radiator cap will generally allow coolant flow from the radiator to the expansion bottle, but not return - the engine may or may not overheat.
 

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Ok - the last time around the symptoms were different...

We went to the market, I got arthritis so my 38 years younger wife toddled off to buy some vegetables and I sat there in the truck. I turned the engine off and I then I became aware of a burbling sound - the water was boiling in the radiator and blowing back into the over-flow bottle. Opened the bonnet, turned on the ignition, the temp gauge was half way only - it's normal position, but the fan was not running although the engine was boiling.
You had no indication of an over heat condition other than the cooling system venting pressure - bubbling into the expansion tank - the gauge was not showing a rise in temperature the way it is this time around, and you don't mention any burbling or boiling over - the problem this time is more likely to be caused by insufficient circulation, either insufficient air flow or coolant flow, and because it occurs when the vehicle is stationary, the probability is it's air flow, hence the suggestion to start with the fan.

I think need to explain the radiator cap operation...

There are three rubber seals in the cap ...

- the lowest of the three seals is a part of a pressure relief valve that pressurizes the cooling system to either 13 or 15 psi (0.9 or 1.1 atm) - the pressurized cooling system allows the engine to run at temperatures that exceed the boiling point of water - this seal was leaking the last time around allowing the coolant to boil at lower temperatures. Under normal circumstances when the coolant heats & expands this valve will lift at the rated pressure allowing the expanding coolant to flow into the expansion reservoir - there is no bubbling (or burbling).

- the second seal is part of a one way valve that allows the return flow of coolant from the expansion reservoir.

- the third and uppermost seal seals the cap to the neck of the radiator forcing the expanding coolant to travel through the hose to the expansion reservoir and also allowing the vacuum that develops in the cooling system when it cools down to draw the coolant back to the radiator - this last seal is the most likely to fail.
 

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2017 Suzuki Ignis SZ-T Auto
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Every time I have had overheating issues with a car, no matter what make it is, when I have rectified the problem, I always, always replace the thermostat, after they have been subjected to overheating they are usually knackered and stuck shut or intermittent in operation, check fans, coolant levels then change the thermostat after flushing out the old coolant.
 

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Suzuki Carry pickup 2013, 1.6 litre G16A 16V.
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I have the same model 1.6 Carry in Thailand. This model has one, impressively big, electric cooling fan which draws air through both the radiator and ac condenser. The first thing I would check is that the fan is working. If the fan is not working and the vehicle is stationary for more than a short period the coolant temp would go up and up and the ac would not work. But if the vehicle is moving at sufficient speed both cooling system and ac would work normally due to the airflow from the movement of the vehicle.

The Carry 1.6 has killer air con if everything is in good working order.
 

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Suzuki Carry pickup 2013, 1.6 litre G16A 16V.
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I just checked the parts book and if it is the radiator fan you don't have to replace the whole thing. The motor is available separately (part number 17120-61J10) about 3600 Baht genuine - US$120 odd.
 
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