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Since my shocks are blown, I'm assuming the stock stabilizer ain't much good neither. In looking around, I see a lot of kits, complete with mounting brackets. The '87 already has a stabilizer and there are already mounts.

Why do I need a kit? I can just use an OEM replacement, right?
 

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Why do I need a kit? I can just use an OEM replacement, right?
On my stock steering setup I just installed a new stabilizer in the stock location. When I switched to power steering, the pitman arm did not have the holes for the bracket so I added the "kit".
I went with the kit towards the bottom of the page :
Suspension - PetroWorks
kinda expensive but super simple bolt on with the brackets they provided.
 

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I've had the Gabriel Silver-E damper on my steering for at least 10 years now. The aftermarket stabilizers are great and will last you forever on this little rig.
 

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when I installed my aftermarket one I just left the OEM on... I figure two are better than one... if you look how the aftermarket ones mount it kinda seems better.
They are a must with larger rubber.
 

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One thing to watch out for folks...
When I first started lifting my Zook I installed a nice Rancho stab kit on the front axle. It looked great and handled well on the road and light trails. When I started doing more technical rock crawling trails I found out really quick that anything on the axle housing will get wacked at the worst times. I destroyed 2 different stab units before I got smart and went with the OME replacement unit. I have also added axle gussets and pumpkin caps for the same reason.

Bottom line - they look and work great until you get into something rough...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
One thing to watch out for folks...
I'm not lifting mine past the OME (famous last words?? :D) but that's the kind of thing I wanted to know.

Don't have big rubber either- just 215/75's. I'm into this thing for the gas mileage mostly. For me, it's an ATV with a place to get in out of the wind. And the ATV is a faster horse that doesn't get tired and can carry more tools. The horse beats walking. Walking beats sitting there waiting for help to come pull the Zuke out of the mud...wait a minute... :D:D
 

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like bills sig says... rocks don't forgive. I don't crawl on rocks so I don't have to worry about armor and such. If and when I do take up rock crawling.. I'm going to learn to weld first...
 

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Yea, they may get beat the crap out of but I would rather replace a shock (thats all it is) than take a direct hit on the axle housing. (well, it will still get hit but at least you know it's coming) ;)
I use the shock as a early warning system. :p
I used to get all good stuff - brand name but after bashing a few I just went with the cheaper stuff. They would last about the same amount of time. One big or three small - rocks that is.

NMHighPlains-
And for waiting for someone to pull you out with no trees... when I first started out I used to dig a hole, hook a chain to the spare tire and drop the tire in the hole, cover it back up with the chain hanging out and hook up my come-a-long to it and pull my self out.
You can grab a cheap 4000lb come-a-long - all of $20 at:
Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices
or a 8000lb for $30
Don't forget to dig your spare out before you leave! I've _never_ done that. :huh:
Some people use a boat anchor...
I just finally just put a 8000 Ramsey on the front and never got stuck again. (it's how things work...)

Baratacus-
mig is easy. Grap a bunch of scap steel and practice. It's not hard at all. It's a buzz sound you will recognize after a point.
 

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Yea, they may get beat the crap out of but I would rather replace a shock (thats all it is) than take a direct hit on the axle housing. (well, it will still get hit but at least you know it's coming) ;)
I use the shock as a early warning system. :p
I'm sorry, but I have to disagree - from personal experiance.
The second time I trashed the Rancho, it bent the shock rod while fully extended. This meant that the steering was stuck full lock to the right -pointing into a rock wall. I also had no way to back out without turning the thing over. The only way to get off the obstacle was to go underneath and remove the stab while being held in place... not a great day.

It is much cheaper protection to just add a good gusset and pumpkin cap. I hate replacing parts for no reason.

 

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kinda off topic, but the pumpkin caps reminded me of it. Was watching some special where these guys were doing some death crawl through the jungles of south america. One of the teams was a couple guys with a built up samurai, full exocage, gears, lockers, snorkle, winch... no under armor though. They were crossing a river and one guy was outside guiding the driver and he dropped his front pumpkin hard right on a boulder. I was thinking "oh crap that diff is toast" sure enough, a little later in the run they front diff blew out and they had to run it RWD the rest of the trip. That night they're talking about it and the guys are baffled as to why their diff went out. COMON! I wasn't even there and I could feel that case smash on the rocks.

End of rant about pumpkin caps. :rolleyes:
 

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I was talking the 'kit' ones that mount on the two steering hardware links with little ubolts.
I don't see a 'kit' one on yours...
but, nice rig. :D
I've never bent one so bad I couldn't turn wheel. I've had them explode oil all over and destroy the fat shock housing. (picture the rod end up toward the passenger/pumkin side and the fat end low and on the driver/truss side.)
But then again, I've bent steering hardware so bad I've had to use the wench and bottle jack to bend it sort-a-straight back just to get back home. I've got a few spares in the shed. I just reuse the rod ends if there stilll good.. I keep meaning to weld on tow halfs of a larger pipe to make them have more meat but never think of it till it's too late, and I'm not sure the stab/shock wouldn't hit and then the little ubolts wouldn't fit. when I first put one on it would hit the pumkin.
 

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I was talking the 'kit' ones that mount on the two steering hardware links with little ubolts.
I don't see a 'kit' one on yours...
but, nice rig. :D
Thanks.
I had to go waaay back to find a picture from the 'Rancho stab' days. It's hard to see here, but the signature white shock is definately visible. This was 9 suspension changes and 3 front bumpers ago...


Once I figured out that they weren't for me, I never went back.
You can see in the picture how low I had mine. I didn't know better then, I just followed instructions. Heck, back then the only other vehicles that used them were the 4x4 toys the rich kids had that never left the curb... so I just installed it like them.
 

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But then again, I've bent steering hardware so bad I've had to use the wench and bottle jack to bend it sort-a-straight back just to get back home.
Been there too. This is a great reason to carry a high lift jack. If you bend your tie rod you can bend it back (pull and rebend or bottle jack) and then sleeve it with the high lift handle. It is best to duct tape the ends so it doesn't clank while you head back to camp...
 
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