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Having problems with my 2003 Suzuki Grand Vitara 2.5 V6, seems to start and idle decent but when you give it gas it surges very badly will misfire when cold and smells like it is getting too much fuel. The warmer the motor gets the worse the problem gets. Undrivable at this point.

Checked the codes and showed a faulty MAPS sensor. Replaced that and the problem still exists. Erased all the codes and reset the check engine light last evening, have run the vehicle now for over an hour and cannot get the check engine light to come back on, although vehicle still has the problem.
So I have two questions for everyone here, one how long does it take for a Suzuki to show codes after the computer is cleared.
And two, anybody have any idea what would be doing this.

Any information would be greatly appreciated!
Thank you!
 

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Fixing (attempt) by code is not the way to go...

Use a live data scanner and check the fuel trims, and O2 for switching with no bias..

Respond with findings...
 

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We had symptoms similar to yours. We needed multiple fixes. First, the wires for the map sensor were pulling from the back of the connector. I had to solder some extra wire in to give it more slack. The other fix was a new maf sensor. Ours wasn't throwing a code but the signal was erratic and as the engine warmed the signal dropped and the engine would stumble then surge. I never would have found it without using a cheap little obd2 plug-in and watching the live stream.
 

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Keep in mind, the codes are set due to the data being outside a set of parameters. A map sensor code is NOT definitive proof of a bad sensor, simply 'bad' data as defined by those parameters. It may be a bad sensor, bad wiring, of something else entirely. This is true for any code that sets off the money light.
Parts store are all too happy to show you a code, then sell you a part. Proper diagnosis involves more than simply pulling codes. As mentioned, live data is the key to proper diagnosis. With the abundance of very inexpensive tools available to pull live data (smart phone and $15 Bluetooth OBDII adapter) it just makes no sense not to use that technology.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
 

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Keep in mind, the codes are set due to the data being outside a set of parameters. A map sensor code is NOT definitive proof of a bad sensor, simply 'bad' data as defined by those parameters. It may be a bad sensor, bad wiring, of something else entirely. This is true for any code that sets off the money light.
Parts store are all too happy to show you a code, then sell you a part. Proper diagnosis involves more than simply pulling codes. As mentioned, live data is the key to proper diagnosis. With the abundance of very inexpensive tools available to pull live data (smart phone and $15 Bluetooth OBDII adapter) it just makes no sense not to use that technology.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
I agree totally, wait till you find an ABS code is actually from a bad wheel bearing then you will understand that diagnosis is key, and the sensor is fine, but code is set from an "out of range" parameter.
 
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