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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey community my first time posting.
I've got a 2002 vitara I replaced the starter on it after installing it started making 1 loud click noise when I go to start it sometimes after 4 or 5 clicks it starts sometimes on first try any first hand knowledge of why. ??? PLEASE HELP. IT HAS 218,000 MILES

Please help me
 

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What engine and transmission?

See the top FAQ thread for starting troubleshooting tips.

Welcome aboard.
 

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I notice you say it "still" makes a "tick noise" - does that mean that you've replaced the starter because of the click noise and it has not solved the problem?

One or more clicks from the starter when trying to start can be caused by numerous faults - starting with a weak battery, loose, dirty or corroded wiring & connections, and yes, a defective starter is a possibility.

How about you give us the whole story?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hey community my first time posting.
I've got a 2002 vitara I replaced the starter on it after installing it started making 1 loud click noise when I go to start it sometimes after 4 or 5 clicks it starts sometimes on first try any first hand knowledge of why. ??? PLEASE HELP. IT HAS 218,000 MILES

Please help me
I notice you say it "still" makes a "tick noise" - does that mean that you've replaced the starter because of the click noise and it has not solved the problem?

One or more clicks from the starter when trying to start can be caused by numerous faults - starting with a weak battery, loose, dirty or corroded wiring & connections, and yes, a defective starter is a possibility.

How about you give us the whole story?
I apologize so here's the full scope about 2 months ago i replaced the starter cause it was clicking when i would turn the key on to start it it wasn't making the multiple clicks like a dead battery only once per turn of the key thinking it was going to fix it well it didn't it has a 2.0 ltr engine w/ 220,118 can also ask is the starter relay built onto the slinoide looking for somebody's knowledge sorry for the half story
 

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From the FAQ thread...see the diagnostic discussion and testing technique employed here..
 

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The only starter "relay" on a 2002 Vitara, when it leaves the factory, is the starter solenoid, and the reason I'm specifying when it leaves the factory, is because people will sometimes fit a contraption known as the "clicky starter fix", in an attempt to resolve the clicking - they search the internet, they find the "fix" so they try it, when all that really needs to be done is to fix the original problem.

Clicking starters, as I mentioned earlier can result from one or more of several causes, starting with the battery, and ending with the starter itself - by the way - that "machine gun rattle" when you turn the key, is not necessarily a dead battery, in fact I've had more "single click" dead batteries than I've had "clack-clack-clack" and the actual causes are the same for both.

Let's start with the "rapid fire clack" symptom - there's a heavy cable from the battery positive to the starter solenoid, and there should also be a second similar cable from the battery negative to one of the bell housing bolts, a second smaller cable goes from the battery positive to the main fuse box and the car's electrical system, and similarly a smaller cable goes from the battery negative to the firewall - all of those connections need to be clean & tight.

Let's assume, for the purpose of discussion, you have a weak battery, it's delivering 12V under "no load" conditions, but when heavily loaded it drops to maybe 10V - when you turn the key to start, that 12V is going to go from the ignition switch to the control terminal on the starter solenoid, and it's enough to pull the solenoid in, when the solenoid pulls in, it engages the drive bendix and then closes a set of contacts to send 12V from the heavy cable connection to the starter motor itself. With a fully charged battery, you would now have several hundred amperes of current flowing, the starter motor would spin, the engine would crank, the car would start, and you would release the key and go about your business. But your battery is weak, it can't deliver a few hundred amps, so the terminal voltage drops, it's no longer enough to pull the solenoid in, so the solenoid drops out, disrupting the current flow to the starter, so the battery terminal voltage jumps back up, so there's now enough to pull the solenoid in, so the solenoid pulls in, closes the contacts, current goes up, voltage goes down, solenoid drops out - and the cycle repeats - clack - clack - clack.

A weak battery (one that needs charging) will cause it, a dead battery can cause it, loose or dirty contacts/connections in the starter circuit can cause it, a defective starter solenoid can cause it, a defective starter motor can cause it - and all of these can also be the cause of a single click (or clack) symptom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The only starter "relay" on a 2002 Vitara, when it leaves the factory, is the starter solenoid, and the reason I'm specifying when it leaves the factory, is because people will sometimes fit a contraption known as the "clicky starter fix", in an attempt to resolve the clicking - they search the internet, they find the "fix" so they try it, when all that really needs to be done is to fix the original problem.

Clicking starters, as I mentioned earlier can result from one or more of several causes, starting with the battery, and ending with the starter itself - by the way - that "machine gun rattle" when you turn the key, is not necessarily a dead battery, in fact I've had more "single click" dead batteries than I've had "clack-clack-clack" and the actual causes are the same for both.

Let's start with the "rapid fire clack" symptom - there's a heavy cable from the battery positive to the starter solenoid, and there should also be a second similar cable from the battery negative to one of the bell housing bolts, a second smaller cable goes from the battery positive to the main fuse box and the car's electrical system, and similarly a smaller cable goes from the battery negative to the firewall - all of those connections need to be clean & tight.

Let's assume, for the purpose of discussion, you have a weak battery, it's delivering 12V under "no load" conditions, but when heavily loaded it drops to maybe 10V - when you turn the key to start, that 12V is going to go from the ignition switch to the control terminal on the starter solenoid, and it's enough to pull the solenoid in, when the solenoid pulls in, it engages the drive bendix and then closes a set of contacts to send 12V from the heavy cable connection to the starter motor itself. With a fully charged battery, you would now have several hundred amperes of current flowing, the starter motor would spin, the engine would crank, the car would start, and you would release the key and go about your business. But your battery is weak, it can't deliver a few hundred amps, so the terminal voltage drops, it's no longer enough to pull the solenoid in, so the solenoid drops out, disrupting the current flow to the starter, so the battery terminal voltage jumps back up, so there's now enough to pull the solenoid in, so the solenoid pulls in, closes the contacts, current goes up, voltage goes down, solenoid drops out - and the cycle repeats - clack - clack - clack.

A weak battery (one that needs charging) will cause it, a dead battery can cause it, loose or dirty contacts/connections in the starter circuit can cause it, a defective starter solenoid can cause it, a defective starter motor can cause it - and all of these can also be the cause of a single click (or clack) symptom.
The only starter "relay" on a 2002 Vitara, when it leaves the factory, is the starter solenoid, and the reason I'm specifying when it leaves the factory, is because people will sometimes fit a contraption known as the "clicky starter fix", in an attempt to resolve the clicking - they search the internet, they find the "fix" so they try it, when all that really needs to be done is to fix the original problem.

Clicking starters, as I mentioned earlier can result from one or more of several causes, starting with the battery, and ending with the starter itself - by the way - that "machine gun rattle" when you turn the key, is not necessarily a dead battery, in fact I've had more "single click" dead batteries than I've had "clack-clack-clack" and the actual causes are the same for both.

Let's start with the "rapid fire clack" symptom - there's a heavy cable from the battery positive to the starter solenoid, and there should also be a second similar cable from the battery negative to one of the bell housing bolts, a second smaller cable goes from the battery positive to the main fuse box and the car's electrical system, and similarly a smaller cable goes from the battery negative to the firewall - all of those connections need to be clean & tight.

Let's assume, for the purpose of discussion, you have a weak battery, it's delivering 12V under "no load" conditions, but when heavily loaded it drops to maybe 10V - when you turn the key to start, that 12V is going to go from the ignition switch to the control terminal on the starter solenoid, and it's enough to pull the solenoid in, when the solenoid pulls in, it engages the drive bendix and then closes a set of contacts to send 12V from the heavy cable connection to the starter motor itself. With a fully charged battery, you would now have several hundred amperes of current flowing, the starter motor would spin, the engine would crank, the car would start, and you would release the key and go about your business. But your battery is weak, it can't deliver a few hundred amps, so the terminal voltage drops, it's no longer enough to pull the solenoid in, so the solenoid drops out, disrupting the current flow to the starter, so the battery terminal voltage jumps back up, so there's now enough to pull the solenoid in, so the solenoid pulls in, closes the contacts, current goes up, voltage goes down, solenoid drops out - and the cycle repeats - clack - clack - clack.

A weak battery (one that needs charging) will cause it, a dead battery can cause it, loose or dirty contacts/connections in the starter circuit can cause it, a defective starter solenoid can cause it, a defective starter motor can cause it - and all of these can also be the cause of a single click (or clack) symptom.
Thank You !!! For your enlightenment very informative will let you all know of the out come
 

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Thank You !!! For your enlightenment very informative will let you all know of the out come
I am also having the same issue on my 02 XL-7. For mine I believe it is either in the steering column or in the key ignition tumbler. when it does this I adjust it up or down and then the suzuki will start. I also thought it was the battery and replaced it to no avail. Still having the problem
 

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Neither the steering column nor the "key ignition tumbler" plays a part in starting the car - the ignition switch, which is physically on the back of the steering lock does - and whilst I have see worn ignition switches that won't crank unless the key is held "just right", you wouldn't normally get that click or clunk from that starter that the original poster is reporting. Some vehicles allow the electrical ignition switch portion of the steering lock assembly to be replaced separately from the steering lock end, some don't

For your situation you need to check the starter control wiring - I'd suggest a 12V test lamp connected between the chassis ground and the small spade terminal on the starter solenoid - the lamp should light brightly every time you turn the key to start - if it does, and the car still does not crank, check the items mentioned in post #7 above. If it doesn't, work your way back, through the wiring to the ignition switch - if your car has an automatic transmission, the NSS or neutral safety switch needs to be checked, if it has a manual transmission, there may be a clutch safety switch.
 
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