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Discussion Starter #1
I'm driving 60mph on freeway..speedometer is saying 95mph(I wish). What is the problem? The speedo cable or the actual speedometer?.
 

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Need more details.

If it had (way) bigger tires, and had the speedo recalibrated for it, then putting normal size tires on it again will do that...although, that seems like pretty drastic numbers.
 

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WHAT? Adjustable?? I was there saturday and it all looked good. I added some oil drops into the speedometer holes. I also noticed that the cable had a zip tie holding the air tube and the cable together so I removed it. I then took it for a spin and NOTHING same old 30mph when I'm only doing 20mph. Can you tell me how to adjust it? I'm currently using the GPS as my Speedometer.
 

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i have been having the same issue with mine. I did do the led conversion on mine though but it says im going 10 mph slower that what i actually am, i have been trying to see how to adjust it but have had no luck. Any suggestions?
 

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Sorry about that I wasn't on this site but yes pretty much all speedo's are adjustable electronically or digitally. Perfect article that rhinoman put up.
 

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It is important to know that the adjustment described at Zuksoffroad is mechanical and only affects the speedometer readout. The adjustment is there specifically for situations where, for some internal-to-the-dash-panel mechanical reason, your speedometer becomes uncalibrated. this would include mishandling or bumping the unit while it is out of the dashboard.

If you make this adjustment to correct your speed on a vehicle with non-stock gearing or tire sizes, the Odometer readings - which are ONLY affected by changes in the drivetrain gearing/tire size - will NOT be correct!

To paraphrase a common advertising statement:

YOUR MILEAGE WILL VARY!

I hope that this helps!
 

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If that is the case then how would you ensure it is correct without stock gearing and tire size? I have always know to go straight to the back of the speedo to compensate
 

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If that is the case then how would you ensure it is correct without stock gearing and tire size? I have always know to go straight to the back of the speedo to compensate
Good question!

Basically the adjustment described in the article involves the adjustment of the tensioning spring in the speedometer pointer mechanism. The speedometer consists of a device that converts the rotational speed of speedometer cable to movement of the speedometer pointer. Increasing the tension with the adjuster causes the pointer to resist the force of the spinning speedometer cable resulting in a lower speed indication. Loosening the adjuster causes the pointer to read a higher rate of speed.

On the other hand, the Odometer displays actual one-to-one distance information through internal gearing connected to the speedometer cable. No amount of tensoning adjustment on the speedometer will correct the Odometer's inaccuracy caused by gearing and tire changes.

That said, how does one make the odometer (and by inference the speedometer) read properly?

This is done by the use on an inline gearing adapter that can be installed on the back of your dash module at the speedometer cable connector.

Speedometer shops sell and install these speedometer gearing adapters. And yes, they are expensive devices that only work correctly with the drivetrain and tire size on the vehicle at the time of installation. Change the tire size or drivetrain gearing again, and your speedometer/odometer starts reading incorrectly again.

In closing, I once owned a vehicle that had one of these speedometer gearing adapter "secretly" installed on the truck. The vehicle was a 1973 Pinzgauer 710M military truck originally operated by the Swiss Army.

The Swiss Army had a problem with young recruits wrecking these trucks by driving them too fast on the twisty, narrow Apline roads. Yes, they were tippy - I had several crap-in-your-pants experiences with mine.

The solution was to put a small gear reduction device on the back of the speedometer where the speedometer cable plugs into the dash. (The speedometer case was sealed so there was no way to "tune" the pointer like one can in a Samurai). This gave the young drivers the impression that they were going faster than they actually were driving. Apparently this trick actually cut down the on accidents caused by driving faster than conditions and the design on the truck permitted..

I hope that this helps!
 

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speedo...

I took another look at digidoggie's post, above and discovered it there was possibly another meaning to his question... Sometimes clear writing on Internet forums is a lost art...

If you were wondering how one field-calibrate the speedometer with the adjustment being on the back, it's an inexact science.

Basically, you tweak the adjuster, slide the dash unit back in place with the steering wheel mounting bolts loosened so that the dash unit will clear the emergency flasher switch, then drive the Samurai while monitoring one's speed with a GPS unit.

Remove the dash unit and repeat the adjustment (It might take an afternoon of start-stop driving) until you have the speedometer closely match what the GPS displays as you are driving.

As I mentioned in the other post, the Odometer will be completely unaffected by this process and will continue to not display accurate mileage until you (or a speedometer shop) install a gear box inline with the speedometer cable. Additionally, you will have to recalibrate the speedometer AGAIN to get it to read correctly after installing the speedometer gearbox.

Personally, I think the whole process is a giant waste of time considering that a GPS is far more accurate, serves other important navigational functions and are not hideously expensive anymore...
 
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