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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
yesterday I went on a big road trip ~300 miles in my allgrip and on my return trip I hit storm Jorge and the rain, wind and road noise was louder than the stereo. Has anyone added any sound proofing and have recommendations on which areas will make the most difference?
 

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Sorry, I cant help, except get less aggressive tyres and you do have base model car (Not a Rolls), you can strip out the complete interior, including hood lining, dash, door trims, carpets and install real sound deadener might help. You'd be surprised how much noise is cancelled when you pull in both wing mirrors and experimenting with cracking open your windows in a particular way can help to cancel noise in some cases.
 

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I bought this stuff (see link below). Stripped out the boot area including the rear inner panels, and the boot door inner panel (they are only light weight plastic panels held by wee plastic clips), plus remove the spare wheel. Just take your time and you won't crack anything. I only covered from the boot to the back doors. I stopped there as I couldn't be faffed (it was a hot Summer's day) with ripping out the front and rear door inner panels. Anyway...the rear end is where a lot of the noise comes from. Our wee car is much quieter, and we see no need to bother with doing anymore sound proofing. NZ roads are mainly a tar/chip combo and rough as guts. Travel 300 odd miles at a time, and find no problems with the road noise now.
Buy Products Online from China Wholesalers at Aliexpress.com
 

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OK, I just checked and I'm def signed out of Ali.
Have put in a new link, does that work OK for you?
If not, then the product I used was 'Uxcell' sound insulation.
Mine is the 6mm thick white foam version (they make a black foam one too).
 

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or wear foam ear plugs, probably cheaper.
 

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or wear foam ear plugs, probably cheaper.
Best answer yet, but most of you will never know how good it really is.

The ear plugs certainly help reduce fatigue on long trips in any vehicle, even more than no radio turned on playing music or talk. They have changed my life, as I have sensitive hearing and I don't need the extra calculations in my brain analysing superfluous unnecessary sounds and noise!
 

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I have a fantastic set of Sony WH-1000XM3 noise cancelling headphones I use on long trips, they make life great, set them for vocal and they allow you to listen to people and the radio but mask everything else.
 

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Tyres have noise ratings - I haven't checked the standard one out, but on my previous car I sourced "quieter" ones and the difference was certainly noticeable. That said I think the Ignis is deficient in respect of sound deadening particularly the wheelarches.
 

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it´s also in how light the car is built, in some areas if you lean on the car, you get the feeling of leaving your body shape on the car, that´s how thin the metal is
 

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Your best bet is in two stages. get underneath and coat everywhere in a sound deadening underseal. I forget what I use but it will make a big difference. You may be shocked at how sparse underbody protection is. Second change tyres but check the Db ratings as you might find you have the lowest rated tyres now; that depends on what tyres you have. Tyre manufacturers designed tyres to project sound upwards so as to give low readings on decibel tests at the kerbside. This means the noise is going up in to the arches. Get plenty of sound deadening material directly above the wheels. It means that some tyres may sound noisy to a person in the street but less noisy to the driver - check it out if you do change tyres. Drumming on certain road surfaces in these tin box cars can be a nightmare.
Also if you have no spare then you are driving a violin case cavity at the back. Either fill it with tyre plus thick automotive sound deadening felt material or just fill it with sound deadening.
Things like tailgate and parcel shelf also add to drumming effects.
The noisiest car I have ever owned was a Celerio and I slaughtered the noise by about 55% by doing these things.
The roof is another area to deaden but we are talking major work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Your best bet is in two stages. get underneath and coat everywhere in a sound deadening underseal. I forget what I use but it will make a big difference. You may be shocked at how sparse underbody protection is. Second change tyres but check the Db ratings as you might find you have the lowest rated tyres now; that depends on what tyres you have. Tyre manufacturers designed tyres to project sound upwards so as to give low readings on decibel tests at the kerbside. This means the noise is going up in to the arches. Get plenty of sound deadening material directly above the wheels. It means that some tyres may sound noisy to a person in the street but less noisy to the driver - check it out if you do change tyres. Drumming on certain road surfaces in these tin box cars can be a nightmare.
Also if you have no spare then you are driving a violin case cavity at the back. Either fill it with tyre plus thick automotive sound deadening felt material or just fill it with sound deadening.
Things like tailgate and parcel shelf also add to drumming effects.
The noisiest car I have ever owned was a Celerio and I slaughtered the noise by about 55% by doing these things.
The roof is another area to deaden but we are talking major work.
I don't think its possible to get a spare tire for an allgrip model? Theres about 4 inches of room under the boot floor.
 
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