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No one has reported any problem with having drum brakes. Have you encountered any?

No one has mentioned a disc brake conversion before. I suspect it wouldn't be cheap even if it's feasible.
 

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99 Tracker, 5 door, 2L, 4x4
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Doubt disk would be any more effective unless you put good load on them (300lb sandbags) to keep the tires in contact and not lock up
 

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The rear brakes do very little - even after 50Kmiles or so there's very little wear on the shoes. On lightweight cars - rear discs with very little work to do would tend to corrode because of lack of scrubbing action by the pads. Additionally the higher efficiency of discs would result in the ABS activating frequently to prevent the rear wheels locking up.
 

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2005 1.6 GV 3 dr Auto
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We have rear drum brakes on our G Vitara and the brakes are really powerful/nice feel.
As previously posted - it is the front brakes which give most braking effort.
 

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I love the drum brakes on my Ignis. Drum brakes have better weather protection and handbrake efficiency is greater.
I don't know if I'd agree with the "weather protection", and that might depend on how you define "weather protection" and why you feel brakes need "weather protection".

The brake mechanism on a disc brake is more exposed to the weather, and more like to corrode if the vehicle is parked in the weather and not frequently driven, other than that I see no need for a bring up weather protection.in a discussion on brakes.

With the "protection" aspect out of the way, if the vehicle is going to be used in the inclement weather, discs have a distinct advantage, discs expel any water that may be between the pads & the discs at the first application of the brakes allowing them to function, drums do not, and if the vehicle has been driven through standing water, which may or may not be common in your part of the world, having discs rather than drums can be the difference between being able to stop or not.

The last thing I'm going to say on weather, is with drum brakes, any water that does enter the mechanism, and is not "boiled away" by the heat of braking, can freeze in cold weather, again, it may not be common in your neck of the woods, but, if it is, then I'm sure you've been at some point told not use the hand brake in freezing weather.

Moving on, I grew up around cars that had drums front & rear, and for most applications, discs are light years ahead of drums. As has been said by several of the previous responders, the rear brakes are not a major contributor to the stopping power of the average passenger car, and there is little advantage to be had from swapping out rear drums for discs. I know of only one advantage, and that is unlikely to be a requirement on an Ignis.

Drum brakes (front or rear) on vehicles that are frequently used in deep sloppy mud require frequent, labor intensive, maintenance - the mud that gets trapped in the drums forms a very effective "grinding paste", and will destroy both drum & lining within a few thousand miles. Getting the mud out of drum brakes requires the drum to be removed, re-fitted & readjusted, with disc brakes, it's a quick blast with a hose.
 

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i have a 21 allgrip, its got hill hold thingummy - think that operates on the rear drums? If so you'd lose that feature if you have it.
What makes you think it would be lost?

Hill hold, which ever end of the vehicle it's deployed on, is going to be done by the ABS modulator holding the hydraulic pressure on whichever brake hardware it uses, for whatever time period it holds for - drum or disc, front or rear, it's still going to hold the pressure, so the brake should still hold the vehicle.
 

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Let me go take a look - I seem to recall seeing a separate actuator for the hill hold

Nope I'm wrong.
What i see is the rigid fluid pipe, the handbrake cable what I thought was another fluid cable is an electrical cable, which runs back to a unit suspended from the underside of the car alongside the exhaust silencer.
 

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Let me go take a look - I seem to recall seeing a separate actuator for the hill hold

Nope I'm wrong.
What i see is the rigid fluid pipe, the handbrake cable what I thought was another fluid cable is an electrical cable, which runs back to a unit suspended from the underside of the car alongside the exhaust silencer.
That's most likely the ABS wheel speed sensor.
 
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