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Discussion Starter #1
How do you get the danged things off? '88 Samurai if it makes any difference.

I hit one a few times with a small sledge but didn't want to dent or damage the drum. (I DID remove the 4 bolts hold the drum on... or were those nuts? I can't remember now). I also had the wheel off, tho that shouldn't make any difference.

Actually I'd just like to adjust the rear brakes and find that the adjustment hole hasn't ever been "punched out". And I figured to punch it out and leave the piece to rattle around in the brakes wouldn't be good. And I also figured that as far out of adjustment as these brakes are, they are probably due for replacement and CAN'T be very expensive.

Do you need a special puller? Or hit it harder? Or do the secret dance three times during a full moon?

Phil
 

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If the brakes are that far gone, the shoes may be worn into drums and that may be why they aren't letting go very easily. A couple things you can do. First make sure your e-brake is released, and then if it doesn't feel slack enough (feel the cable firmness at the rear axle) disconnect the cable at the back of the drum. With the four axle nuts removed (center of the drum) put the tire back on, just leave at least a half inch of space between the lugs and the wheel. Make sure the jack stands are sturdy and the vehicle is stable. Use the wheel as a slide hammer to 'yank' the drum off.
If after 3-4 good whacks it doesn't pull loose, bleed the brakes at the rear wheels, and try again.
 

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What I have found helpful is to first put your lucky underwear on, grab a case of beer, drink 4 of the beer, make sure the vehicle is safely on the jack stands and then rent a slide hammer and go to town until eith er the drum comes off or you need a beer break. I find that after 6 beer per side and a big slide hammer it is all good. The only problem is that I have to wait until the next day to actually do anything productive once the drums are off (and the beer is gone). Remember we are talking Canadian Beer here so has a higher % goodness, factor that into the exchange ratio.

Seriously I just use a slid hammer and it works like a charm, some parts stores lend them out or you may need to rent one.

Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What I have found helpful is to first put your lucky underwear on, grab a case of beer, drink 4 of the beer, make sure the vehicle is safely on the jack stands and then rent a slide hammer and go to town until eith er the drum comes off or you need a beer break. I find that after 6 beer per side and a big slide hammer it is all good. The only problem is that I have to wait until the next day to actually do anything productive once the drums are off (and the beer is gone). Remember we are talking Canadian Beer here so has a higher % goodness, factor that into the exchange ratio.

Seriously I just use a slid hammer and it works like a charm, some parts stores lend them out or you may need to rent one.

Cheers.
Thanks yet again PP.

I'll just set up a "practice session" on Saturday (I'll drink the beer but only look at the Zuki drums.... this weekend is reserved for distributor work, which also requires liquid cooling).

I've used slide hammers before but don't own one so I'll see if I can borrow from an auto parts store. Dang, but I was hopin' for an easier way.

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If the brakes are that far gone, the shoes may be worn into drums and that may be why they aren't letting go very easily. A couple things you can do. First make sure your e-brake is released, and then if it doesn't feel slack enough (feel the cable firmness at the rear axle) disconnect the cable at the back of the drum. With the four axle nuts removed (center of the drum) put the tire back on, just leave at least a half inch of space between the lugs and the wheel. Make sure the jack stands are sturdy and the vehicle is stable. Use the wheel as a slide hammer to 'yank' the drum off.
If after 3-4 good whacks it doesn't pull loose, bleed the brakes at the rear wheels, and try again.
I shoulda read your post first Bill. I just responded to the email about "new post" and didn't read farther until I was going back to the index.

The brakes aren't adjusted out enough to be keeping the drum on. I can pull each side's emergency brake cable more than an inch.

I like your "makeshift" slide hammer suggestion and will give it a try, reverting to the actual slide hammer if I need to.

Phil
 

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If you are using the tire idea make sure you get the lug nuts threaded on to a depth where they have a good bite. I tried this and ended up stripping the last threads of the studs because I did not have them on far enough.
 

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If you are using the tire idea make sure you get the lug nuts threaded on to a depth where they have a good bite. I tried this and ended up stripping the last threads of the studs because I did not have them on far enough.
Good point. Because at that point you can't get to the back of the drum to replace the studs... GET A GOOD BITE!
thanks PP.
 
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