Suzuki Forums banner

41 - 59 of 59 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
64 Posts
Yep, many thanks to Max for going the extra mile. That's what really makes the Internet shine, you can find good info on just about anything these days.

My sensor should be here tomorrow. I will remove the old one and cut the plug off of it and connect it to the new plug.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,655 Posts
Nice job Scorch! Thanks for compiling and sharing the "guide". It speaks volumes! It certainly will help folks to the maximum!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
O2 Sensors

1.Ok, when you pop your hood, remove the top plastic shroud or cover that is on the top of the engine like you would to change your spark plugs.

2. look at the backside of your engine and if you look close enough, you will see two sets of exhaust pipes that join into a V shape. Your engine is classified in 2 banks. Bank 1 is everything associated with cylinders 1,2 and 3. Bank 2 is associated with cylinders 4,5 and 6. Bank 1 has three pipes covered with a heat shield going from the top end of the engine down under the car. From the passenger side, you will see bank 1. From the drivers side, you will see bank 2 and you will see where both banks begin to join together to lead under the car.

3. You're gonna have to stick your head down in there but on each side, you will see two plugs. They are directly between the back of the engine and the firewall. One will be about 8 inches above the other on each side. The top one is your primary or upstream. The bottom one will be your secondary or downstream. Each plug has a grey insulation cover over it. Each plug is kinda brass colored and will protrude about 2 inches from the exhaust and have a small collar around it.

4. Spend the time and 10 dollars and go to your parts store and get an O2 sensor socket. If you dont, you will spend several hours trying to get the sensors in and out versus 2 or 3 minutes. The socket will be heavy duty metal and have a slit cut out in the side of it to get it in and out without cutting wires. If you have trouble getting them out, use a bit of penitrating oil then try again.

5. Once you get them out, make certain that your new ones have "Anti-Seize" on the threads and put them in. Once they are all in and connected, double check your vaccum tubes. There are several back there that are easily bumped and unplugged. If you dont re-connect them, your car will run like crap.

The universal sensors are good. Bosche makes them and they cost about 70 bucks each. You will have to attatche the old connector to the new wires. It takes a little time but its easy.

Make sure you do this with a cool engine. Makes life a little more pleasant.

Have fun!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
64 Posts
Rear view of engine showing the UPPER two sensors. The one boxed is Bank 2, Sensor 1. Next to it (opposite side) on the left is Bank 1, Sensor 1. Now, directly below and after the cat converter (but not pictured) are the 2nd set of sensors. Bank 1 & 2 number 2 sensors?

url=https://imgur.com/yrNgrXD]
[/url]

Max
2. look at the backside of your engine and if you look close enough, you will see two sets of exhaust pipes that join into a V shape. Your engine is classified in 2 banks. Bank 1 is everything associated with cylinders 1,2 and 3. Bank 2 is associated with cylinders 4,5 and 6. Bank 1 has three pipes covered with a heat shield going from the top end of the engine down under the car. From the passenger side, you will see bank 1. From the drivers side, you will see bank 2 and you will see where both banks begin to join together to lead under the car.
Here I am, back in the O2 sensor thread. I never dreamed, growing up as a boy on the farm, that I would be engaged in a life-or-death struggle with impossible to reach O2 sensors, but here I am. ^_^

Yep, my car was due for state inspection back in Jan but since I got a Check Engine Soon light about two months after I replaced the first O2 sensor (14 months ago), I have been putting this off. Well, I finally decided to take the car in to get the inspection, and naturally, it failed. This time the Fault Code is: P0051: HOS2 Heater Control Circuit Low Bank 2 Sensor 1 So, that means I need to replace the one in Max's box, right? I'm curious why centerforce says the Bank 2 is on the driver's side? I have a US left side drive car, so the Bank 2 is on the passenger side, right?

Oh, and one other question: I should be able to order the same part number as the other sensor on Bank 1 Sensor 1 that I replaced last year, right?

thanks!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,655 Posts
I'm curious why centerforce says the Bank 2 is on the driver's side? I have a US left side drive car, so the Bank 2 is on the passenger side, right?
He must be a right seat driver I guess. :rolleyes:

Bank #2 = right side of vehicle as you sit in it, facing forward. :D

Oh, and one other question: I should be able to order the same part number as the other sensor on Bank 1 Sensor 1 that I replaced last year, right?
Yep! Only diff between sensor #1 and #2 that I am aware of is the wire length, assuming one is getting the assemblies w/the harness connector on the end already. Side doesn't matter.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
64 Posts
Well, Max, I've hit the wall. I cannot get a wrench on the sensor and not even close to whatever is holding the wiring clip. :( I think I will need to disconnect the exhaust below the cat convertor and pull the exhaust manifold to get to the sensor. I don't mind the extra work, but we all know how it goes when you try to loosen exhaust bolts on a 7 year old vehicle. One rounded nut and I have a lot of problems. :eek:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,655 Posts
You need THIS combo for the sensor...


and MY (retired Sailor) vocabulary to help get the harness disconnected. ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
64 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
64 Posts
Well, I gave up trying to get the plug apart, couldn't budge it. So, instead, I cut the wires at the sensor. That allowed me to get my MC wrench on the sensor and get it off easy enough.


Then I used needle-nose pliers to hold each wire and trim the insulation, and connected to the new sensor wires with crimp connectors. I looped the excess up to a wire bundle on the firewall. I will not have this problem when I need to replace the sensors next time, now I have plenty of slack in the wires to cut and connect.

Passed emmissions inspection. :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
64 Posts
Update: I see Autozone is selling that 22mm sensor socket for around $9 now. Not the part online, but in the generic packaging with the jaw pullers.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
P0153

so i have a 2004 verona also about 110 k
and finally getting the P0171 P0174 and P0153 O2 sensor codes.
my mechanic friend is simply refusing to let me believe it's only a matter of the O2 sensor. He keep saying there are many reasons for the thing to read oil running lean. P0153 is Os sensor slow circuit or something like that, should i try to change the O2 sensor first or just take it to the shop

*there were problems with the cars electrical system, i had to replace the fuse harness
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,655 Posts
Your friend makes a valid point.

See this article...
Oxygen Sensor Codes - A Complete Guide On Diagnosing Automotive Oxygen Sensors

I'd suggest first conducting the preliminary maintenance as described in the article and then clearing the ECU codes (battery disconnect or with scan machine), followed by another scan to observe what codes return and pop up first. This will allow you to better diagnose the problem. ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
179 Posts
Oxygen sensor sockets

In this thread there are pictures of two oxygen sensor sockets, one being a Tekton posted by Max with a 3/8" offset hole and the other being a star hole. I have now both but the problem for the driver side (U.S.) oxygen sensor replacement is that there is not enough clearance to fit a breaker bar (or offset wrench) to the hole. On the one side, the transmission oil dipstick tube interferes. So what I have on order is a Lisle 12390 oxygen sensor socket, which has the same design but with what should be to me a very important 1/2" hole at the end of the "foot."

https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-12390-Oxygen-Sensor-Wrench/dp/B001C6NE40/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1524425031&sr=8-3&keywords=lisle+oxygen+sensor+socket

The other socket worked well for the passenger side, but no matter how hard I try I can't get a bar or wrench or extension under to that little hole. They're just too thick.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
179 Posts
I do and did see the wrench pictured, but as to the driver side sensor given the handle length I have considerable doubt that a box wrench can actually fit in the relevant area. The firewall would readily prevent it in my estimation. If the Lisle does not work, my plan is to cut the existing sensor in half and get a regular 22 mm socket on it, with a handle shorter than pictured. Right now I'm shopping for a short "handle" for the Lisle socket 1/2" foot end drive hole.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
179 Posts
Success using the Lisle socket w/ 1/2" hole and three 1/2" drive extensions

Wrapping up - See pics, depicting the Lisle 22 mm socket identified in my above post with the key 1/2" drive hole at end of "foot"; 3" extension (1/2" drive); 9" long L shaped drive extension (1/2" drive); and 5" extension (1/2" drive).
For a 2002 XL-7, the pieces fit together in precisely that order to enable snake around in the engine bay avoiding the tubes etc., and enough extension for twisty torque on the 22 mm nut. The assembled version shows roughly how the apparatus looked when peering at it over the fender.
Thanks to all - including especially Max and Scorch.
 
41 - 59 of 59 Posts
Top