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So i recently picked up a 1990 samurai. I discovered that the water pump weep hole was pouring out coolant. Im trying to learn how to do my own mechanics, so i went out and got a haynes manual, a new water pump, and some tools. I put the new water pump in, but i made a few mistakes. I did not put the piston to TDC, and i didn't put the timing belt in EXACTLY the way the manual says. It said to put the belt on the crankshaft pulley first, i put it on the camshaft first. I didn't think it would matter, the mark i made on the camshaft pulley/timing belt lined up perfectly.

So I went to start it up after getting it all together. It idled roughly, then died.
Im thinking i screwed up the timing.

I want to fix it but how? what tools do i need? where do i start? keep in mind im new at this!

Any help appreciated, thanks in advance.
 

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So i recently picked up a 1990 samurai. I discovered that the water pump weep hole was pouring out coolant. Im trying to learn how to do my own mechanics, so i went out and got a haynes manual, a new water pump, and some tools. I put the new water pump in, but i made a few mistakes. I did not put the piston to TDC, and i didn't put the timing belt in EXACTLY the way the manual says. It said to put the belt on the crankshaft pulley first, i put it on the camshaft first. I didn't think it would matter, the mark i made on the camshaft pulley/timing belt lined up perfectly.

So I went to start it up after getting it all together. It idled roughly, then died.
Im thinking i screwed up the timing.

I want to fix it but how? what tools do i need? where do i start? keep in mind im new at this!

Any help appreciated, thanks in advance.


The following assumes that you did not touch the distributor or sparkplug wiring in any way and that you did not turn either the crank or camshaft with the belt off.

If you did not actually rotate the camshaft or crankshaft when installing the belt, most likely the problem lies in the fact that you had slack in the belt on the right side - the side that does not have the tensioner on it when you put it back together. Putting the belt on crank first or camshaft pulley is not as important as putting it on so that there zero slack on the right side of the belt path.

The best solution is to remove the timing belt cover, hand-turn the crank pulley with a 17mm socket and ratchet until it is positioned EXACTLY as the Haynes book specified AND the cam pulley is postioned very close to where the Haynes book says it should be. It probably won't be exact because of the slack that you accidently placed in the belt. It WILL be very close, though.

Carefully remove the belt after loosening the tensioner.

Reposition the camshaft back to it's proper position - probably no more than a belt tooth or two off - and reinstall the belt with ZERO slack on the right side belt path opposite the tensioner mechanism. If the camshaft pulley is almost but not exactly 180 degrees off turn the camshaft so it IS EXACTLY 180 degrees opposite of what you thought it should be. Some claim that the Haynes manual is incorrect on this point and it may actually be wrong. You can't miss if you find the camshaft pullley only slightly off from straight up or down


Reset the tensioner per the instructions then rotate the crankshaft two turns (720 degrees) to reseat the timing belt. Check the tensioner and the pulley marks to be sure that the pulleys are back in sync. Two turns put you back to where you were before you put the belt on.

If everything looks okay, re-install the timing belt cover plus all the stuff that was in the way and start your truck. It should run properly!

I hope that this helps!
 
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