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Hi there :)

Just bought a new Suzuki Ignis hybrid 1.2 and find the biting point so high and find it hard to judge where the biting point is. As a result Keep stalling the car on junctions. Has anyone else experienced this with the Ignis? is it just about getting used to it?

Secondly does the “stop idling” at traffic lights only work when the car is in natural? For example if you have your foot down on the clutch, in gear at the traffic lights a message appears on the screen “ stop idling unavailable”

Interested to hear your thoughts!
Thank you,

james
 

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Welcome to this forum

I deduce you mean the clutch action in your first query. I've not found it a problem.

Stop/start only works when the gearlever is in neutral and your foot is off the clutch pedal.
 

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The stop/start also works (foot off clutch, gear in neutral) at very low speeds <15kph, or thereabouts.

I am not finding the clutch biting position a problem on my new Ignis Hybrid 2WD, but the motor is much quieter than the Panda Twin Air I drove previously, so I find judging engine speed a bit tricky. In time I'll get used to it.

I do have a question, though. Do you find the drive a bit 'jerky' at times? I find that the car feels as if it is firing on only three cylinders, then four, then three and then four for a few seconds at a time in certain conditions. I encounter this when the motor is cold and driving up a steep hill (approx 1 in 4, possibly a bit steeper). Because I drive up this particular road 2 or 3 times a week, I can say with certainty that the problem is not just occasional, as it happens every time!
 

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I find the clutch fine; only a graunchy reverse annoys me.
I also find the engine, while a bit weedy, to be very smooth revving; I suspect there is an issue with yours blag.
 

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The story about the clutch bite point. Fact is, power to weight is a big factor. Bigger gas guzzler manuals, like 5.8L manuals are easy to take off without revving the engine. Little shit box 1.0L manuals need a rev to not stall. I have read the 1.2L Ignis falls into the gutless category, so you need to rev and drop clutch a bit quicker to compensate. The smoothest clutch bite I have ever experienced was in a 1971 landcruiser, with a 4L engine. you may have heard of "double clutching" in old trucks. I'll tell you now, tripple clutching an Ignis works to prevent engine stalling and that is just to take off in 1st from a standing start - try it.
 

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Utter nonsense.
Easiest car to stall I’ve had was a 3.2 litre Golf; why? Because it had a very (too) responsive throttle and a fine bite poi
Small engines don’t need revving hard.
And it’s double de-clutching; I did it extensively in my Police driving course as well as my IAM advanced driving test.
There is no such thing as triple de-clutching and I have never stalled our Ignis.
 

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Utter nonsense.
Easiest car to stall I’ve had was a 3.2 litre Golf; why? Because it had a very (too) responsive throttle and a fine bite poi
Small engines don’t need revving hard.
And it’s double de-clutching; I did it extensively in my Police driving course as well as my IAM advanced driving test.
There is no such thing as triple de-clutching and I have never stalled our Ignis.
Go drive a B series Mack quadbox, then you learn triple clutching very quickly.
 

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Never thought I'd be doing it, but I have to agree with Kernowlad.

The story about the clutch bite point. Fact is, power to weight is a big factor. Bigger gas guzzler manuals, like 5.8L manuals are easy to take off without revving the engine. Little shit box 1.0L manuals need a rev to not stall. I have read the 1.2L Ignis falls into the gutless category, so you need to rev and drop clutch a bit quicker to compensate. The smoothest clutch bite I have ever experienced was in a 1971 landcruiser, with a 4L engine. you may have heard of "double clutching" in old trucks. I'll tell you now, tripple clutching an Ignis works to prevent engine stalling and that is just to take off in 1st from a standing start - try it.
Utter nonsense is about the best description.

What's your experience with small engines like? I'll be the first to admit they don't have the torque (or power) of a bigger engine, but having grown up around small engines, I will state that a lot of what has been said here is nonsense. I learned to drive at the age of twelve on a Morris "Mini Moke" (google it if you need to) - 850cc, low compression engine - and I learned to move off without touching the accelerator - clutch control - I've also had an 875cc Hillman Imp, an 800cc Suzuki Fronte, and driven, but not owned a Suzuki LJ80.

I have read the 1.2L Ignis falls into the gutless category, so you need to rev and drop clutch a bit quicker to compensate
You read about it or you experienced it? Your technique is what's at fault here - if you "drop" the clutch, you WILL stall it - ease off the clutch and you'll be fine. There's no need to "rev" the engine, just add enough throttle to keep it from stalling whilst you get it rolling.

Let's talk now about double clutching (and triple clutching) - the reason an old truck driver double clutches is to shift a non-synchromesh manual transmission - you WILL NEVER see or hear them double clutch just to pull away from a stand still - the procedure goes like this ...

Truck is moving nearing the top of the power curve so the driver needs to shift gear - the driver will ...

1 - step on the clutch to disengage it and shift into neutral
2 - release the clutch to engage it
3 - rev the engine to spin up the unloaded transmission input shaft
4 - step on the clutch to disengage it
5 - shift into gear
6 - release the clutch

The concept is all about "rev matching" - matching the rpms of the two gears (actually a gear and an engagement hub) so that they slide into mesh without crunching - not about unloading the engine because of a lack of a torque or power. You'll find it's required more on a down shift than an upshift.

Now that I've explained not only how to double (de)clutch, but also the reason for it - let me hear you explain the triple clutching - and 2013GV - I have my eye on you here. I've never driven a quad box Mack but unless you're shifting more than one box, which is not the case with an ignis, triple clutching is not going to be required.
 

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The triple clutching (no gear change - do you understand that?) to take off from start in an underpowered car is about taking off without stalling by letting the engine rev free (back to idle speed or just above) to increase torque (try it one dayon a flat surface to learn). It's a reflex thing I do on inclines instead of pressing the accelerator pedal and riding the clutch and burning it away (the normal practice). We all know a rolling start is better for clutch grab and long life. It's one of those things you need to be with me in the car to understand because it's a very precise thing "being the car" when I drive, not just "driving" it. NO, I don't take drugs, but I do over-think and analyes everything to get the most "bang for buck"! Honest truth is I have never burned out a clutch in 36 years of driving.
 

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Should have bought an auto. No problems with bite points. All cars will have no gears before long. Get used to it...
I've had eleven autos out of twenty-five cars that I've now owned and only bought this 2018 Ignis manual because I wanted a little run-around for the odd occasion and cost wise and availability made it fit the bill. Our main car is a Vitara auto and that's what we use for long drives and most of the time.
No bite point problem...
 

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I do have a question, though. Do you find the drive a bit 'jerky' at times? I find that the car feels as if it is firing on only three cylinders, then four, then three and then four for a few seconds at a time in certain conditions. I encounter this when the motor is cold and driving up a steep hill (approx 1 in 4, possibly a bit steeper). Because I drive up this particular road 2 or 3 times a week, I can say with certainty that the problem is not just occasional, as it happens every time!
Hello everybody. Me too find the drive a bit 'jerky' at times on my new Ignis. The engine has "gaps" when driving at low rpm.
@blag: there is a long discussion about this problem on the Italian forum of "Quattroruote"
 

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The official Suzuki workshop near me is mystified.

I have taken the car there three times, and on each occasion I have complained about the hesitancy of the motor. On the second visit, the engine management software was updated, but it made little difference. On each occasion that I visited the workshop I was unable to replicate the problem, which, of course, did not help matters.

Apart from the local workshop, my dealings with Suzuki have been most unsatisfactory.

I have had enough of this: the car does not suit me well, and on Thursday I have an appointment for a test drive of a non-Suzuki car.

I recently discovered the other thread on another forum (to which you refer). It's a bit lengthy and somewhat repetitive, but it gives some solace to know that I am not alone!
 
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