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Discussion Starter #1
Ok guys, I pulled a stooge. I have an 88 Samurai and I am in the process of putting a clutch in. Problem is: when I removed the drive shafts, I did not mark them.......

Yeah........

What to do? My idea is to take them to a place here in Tulsa that will spin check them for balance. Thought I would replace all of the U-joints while I'm at it. Theye will do it cheap, and I would not have to worry. I bought an excellent used T-case, so I already had the shafts off.

Is it really a big deal to mark the flanges so that they can be put back exactly as they were?..... The Haynes manual says it is.

What do you guys say?

Many thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you have pulled the shafts apart, look closely at the splined ends. There is a dot (pin hole) that shows what splines to line up.
I never would have thought to look and see. I just assumed that there would be no way to tell.

Thanks Billjohn!

This place is invaluable!

:D
 

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If the "dot" thing doesn't work out for you...drive it and if you HAVE a vibe, just mark & turn (re-clock) the flange make-up and try again. You may have to do this several times in order to find the original "sweet spot". :)

And if you tackle the "U" joints, mark the relative positions of the yoke and shaft before you disassemble to prevent getting THEM out of synch. ;)
 

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You have to make sure the U-joints are 'in phase'. What does this mean? It means that they should be in exactly the same position at both ends of the shaft. Here is a pic that shows (sort of) how the angles need to compliment each other to allow synchronized movement at the front and rear of the shaft. I know, I know... this is a single shaft without splines, but I couldn't find another pic righ away. The idea is the same.


If a splined shaft gets pulled apart, it is important that it go back together so that the u-joints line up like the pic. The dots on the splined ends make it easy.
Now this is for a stock Zook shaft, for those folks that have upgraded to CV shafts it is a whole different set of rules.

...and no. You don't have to mark the diff or t-case to make sure the yoke gets bolted on exactly the way it came off. This is a 4wd vehicle with a transfer case... the front and rear shafts are never going to be (or need to be) in 'synch' with each other. Once the t-case gear lever is shifted, it would change the rate and there goes any synchronization.

Just keep the u-joints in phase and you will be good.
 

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Bill. I don't think that he "pulled the shafts apart" (yet).

He just unbolted the flange end without first marking it's relative position flange to flange. Right? :)
 

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Ahhh.
I guess I am just thinking too far ahead. I remember when I first pulled mine off and I pulled it apart to get it out of the way. THAT was a lesson learned...
:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ahhh.
I guess I am just thinking too far ahead. I remember when I first pulled mine off and I pulled it apart to get it out of the way. THAT was a lesson learned...
Yes, I did indeed! I guess I forgot to mention that, but I did do exactly as you say Billjohn. Pulled the splines apart to get them out of the way!
That pictures says a lot to me.

Thanks!
 
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