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Discussion Starter #1
hi guys,

need help here!

my engine's overheating but i cant find the cause. coolant is intact and no leak from the radiator. how do i check if the water pump is working without removing major parts? (i have to get through the timing belt housing to do this) i cleaned out the inlet and outlet ports to the engine but found no problem. where do i find the thermostat to check if it's stuck? i think the coolant is not circulating as i observed the open radiator while running the engine.

thanks
 

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I have had the same problem in the past,to check your water pump i just sqeeze the rad hoses and if you feel presure when it running then it should be fine i would say that its probably your thermostat but first when your temp gage reaches about half way your rad fan should kick in and if it dosent check your fuse. thermostats are pretty cheap and pretty easy to install,but i hope that its only a fuse cause its pretty cold to be wrenching on a car in this whether .so good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks jayzz,

yup, i think its the thermostat. fuses are ok and the fan is working right. will check out the thermostat next. is it possible for the sensor on my manifold to get faulty?
 

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Yup! Check the thermostat, it's on the upper hose of the radiator going to the engine. Meron na tayong thread yan and picture. But the thermostat dun galing sa hi-jet but the same lang size kaya no problem.

Sa Eb may dala akong sample. I put one in a boiling water and it open naman but i have not buy a new one at mahal sa Casa ng Zuki. Iba't-iba pa ang pricing ng casa. Sa Pasig P750, at sa shaw 1K++. nagtanong ako sa Banawe sa Suzuki o Link auto shop at 7oo++ ang benta nila. Sa iba it goes down to 500 but you have to bring a sample to be sure.

Ang nakalagay na thermostat has a temperature of 82 degrees.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks YT!

i bought a new radiator cap (circuit brand) for P150 yesterday before checking on the thermostat. yup, by elimination it really might be the thermostat. the store said better to just remove it anyway we have a hot weather so no problem with cold starts (which is what the thermostat's purpose is for). where in pasig do you buy zuk stuff?
 

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E chek mo ang radiator baka, marumi na, maraming na sigurong kalawang..Nangyari na rin sa kin yan, akala ko me crack ang cylinder head, pero wala naman.Kc pag me crack, lalabas sa muffler ang puting usok...e disconnect ang hose ng radiator ,patuyuin lagyan mo ng konting rust converter at e flush after 15min.. Test mo lang, it works for my van.;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks cobalt, was just thinking that. i'm actually in the process of tracing where the problem is. i just removed the manifold output and found no thermostat. so i guess there's no thermostat problem. how do we know if the water pump is not working. the radiator is working well as it drains and fills quickly. and i regularly flush it as well. hope its not a cracked head. thanks guys. appreciate the help.

am going to reinstall the output line from the manifold now.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
mission accomplished! road tested my yellow cab and no more overheating! did what you said cobalt, thanks! i found traces of radiator sealant and red gasket maker blocking the water passage. apparently the guy who removed the thermostat used red gasket maker instead of the asbestos gasket (which was what i put when i reinstalled it) and some of the residual gasket clogged the whole thing. i flushed the whole cooling system (radiator as well as in the engine) just to make sure. will re flush the radiator again next week just to be sure.

i guess the pressure dislodged the particles when i tried maxing the tach the other day. was changing gears at 5500rpm to clock some speed and just to see how far the gears would push. it was after that that the temo gauge registered at the half mark.

thanks guys for your help!

end of thread... haha! hopefully!
 

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thanks YT!

i bought a new radiator cap (circuit brand) for P150 yesterday before checking on the thermostat. yup, by elimination it really might be the thermostat. the store said better to just remove it anyway we have a hot weather so no problem with cold starts (which is what the thermostat's purpose is for). where in pasig do you buy zuk stuff?
Cars need thermostats here in the Philippines and the rest of the world.
I have been a master certified ASE service tech for over 25 years.
I have heard filippino mechanics say "we don't need thermostats its cold in japan"
This statment is FALSE!

isporttrak's comment
"just remove it anyway we have a hot weather so no problem with cold starts (which is what the thermostat's purpose is for)"


this is rubbish and untrue!

Please read about thermostats before you post "your opinion"
A thermostat that is used in automobiles uses an internal combustion engine to regulate the flow of the coolant. When the thermostat is open, the coolant passes through the cylinder head where it looses the heat the air that flows through it. A water pump that is driven from the engine will propel the coolant around the system. When the thermostat is closed the flow is then prevented and the engine is then allowed to heat up to its optimum temperature.

A thermostat operates mechanically. It makes use of a wax pellet which is inside a sealed chamber. The wax is solid at low temperatures but when the engines heats up the wax will then melt and expand. The sealed chamber has an expansion provision that operates the rod that will open a valve when the operating temperature is exceeded. However, the operating temperature is fixed, but it is also determined by the specific composition of the wax. Therefore thermostats of this type can maintain different temperatures, often in the range of 70 degC to 90 degC, which is 160 to 200 degF.

Modern engines are run at over 80 degC or 180 degF, which is quite hot, but it is in order to run more efficiently and to reduce the emission of pollutants. A lot of thermostats contain a small hole in which they vent any gas that might get into the system. In other words, if air is introduced during the coolant replacement. Modern cooling systems contain a relief valve in the form of a spring-loaded radiator pressure cap, that has a tube leading to a partially filled expansion reservoir. Because of the high temperature, the cooling system becomes pressurized to a maximum that is set by the relief valve. The additional pressure will then increase the boiling point of the coolant and that would be above that of the atmospheric pressure.

Just wanted to clear this up for all the mechanics out there who think we dont need thrmostats.
Thanks
 

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thermostats.

Cars need thermostats here in the Philippines and the rest of the world.
I have been a master certified ASE service tech for over 25 years.
I have heard filippino mechanics say "we don't need thermostats its cold in japan"
This statment is FALSE!

isporttrak's comment
"just remove it anyway we have a hot weather so no problem with cold starts (which is what the thermostat's purpose is for)"


this is rubbish and untrue!

Please read about thermostats before you post "your opinion"
A thermostat that is used in automobiles uses an internal combustion engine to regulate the flow of the coolant. When the thermostat is open, the coolant passes through the cylinder head where it looses the heat the air that flows through it. A water pump that is driven from the engine will propel the coolant around the system. When the thermostat is closed the flow is then prevented and the engine is then allowed to heat up to its optimum temperature.

A thermostat operates mechanically. It makes use of a wax pellet which is inside a sealed chamber. The wax is solid at low temperatures but when the engines heats up the wax will then melt and expand. The sealed chamber has an expansion provision that operates the rod that will open a valve when the operating temperature is exceeded. However, the operating temperature is fixed, but it is also determined by the specific composition of the wax. Therefore thermostats of this type can maintain different temperatures, often in the range of 70 degC to 90 degC, which is 160 to 200 degF.

Modern engines are run at over 80 degC or 180 degF, which is quite hot, but it is in order to run more efficiently and to reduce the emission of pollutants. A lot of thermostats contain a small hole in which they vent any gas that might get into the system. In other words, if air is introduced during the coolant replacement. Modern cooling systems contain a relief valve in the form of a spring-loaded radiator pressure cap, that has a tube leading to a partially filled expansion reservoir. Because of the high temperature, the cooling system becomes pressurized to a maximum that is set by the relief valve. The additional pressure will then increase the boiling point of the coolant and that would be above that of the atmospheric pressure.

Just wanted to clear this up for all the mechanics out there who think we dont need thrmostats.
Thanks
Yes ill second that . Some of the 'expert' mechanics will tell you that its not necessary to use thermostats in the Philippines .....Wrong ! I tested this theory on an F6A engine. Result .....the engine is almost always running too cool. The automatic choke sensor on the carb runs accordingly and hey presto .......always running too rich . Sooty plugs etc etc. Unfortunately ,the failiure rate of thermostats seems pretty high on the F6A motor at least.
 

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hi guys,

need help here!

my engine's overheating but i cant find the cause. coolant is intact and no leak from the radiator. how do i check if the water pump is working without removing major parts? (i have to get through the timing belt housing to do this) i cleaned out the inlet and outlet ports to the engine but found no problem. where do i find the thermostat to check if it's stuck? i think the coolant is not circulating as i observed the open radiator while running the engine.

thanks
I had this before, check the part where the distributor CAP and tension wire is connected, last time it was adjusted by the mechanic when he replaced the contact point then overheating crop out, what I did I reverted it back by gradually adjusting it, next, I added an auxilliary fan. then thats it..solved

Hope this helps
 

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Additional auxilliary fan does't help.
This is what you need, cooling system monitoring which my van have.
PM me at [email protected]
Features:
1. You'll know what's the temperature of your cooling liquid.
2. You'll know that cooling liquid is circulating.
3. You can set the cooling fan turn on temperature.
4. If fan fails or cooling liquid is too high, you can hear alarm sound.
With this you will know early that you're engine is going to overheat and pull over early.
 

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This problem of overheating is also my major problem on my joypop every van..i bought this van just recently..i overhauled the engine( replaced the following parts..crankshop,pistons and ring set, connecting rods, con rod and main bearings, valves and valve guides) and inserted a standard cylinder liner...Just did almost everything to make it sure that my f6 will run efficiently but found after running it that there is a problem on coolant circulation...i have a sure working pump on my other multicab, so i interchange them but still it doesnt prime by itself..i can let them pump if i flush the rad hose with a garden hose to push any air inside the jackets and the entire coolant passages and quickly placing the hoses to the radiator(not to drain the water inside)..the pump will work when i do that, but if i drain again the rad to the point that the water stops dripping, and then refill it to top, when i re start the motor it will not pump again...every parts was fine when we openned it, and also consulted the machine shop regarding the condition of my cyl head and they told me that its the valves and guides that are needed to be replaced, the surface are leveled...im not very sure if they check it for any crack....one thing i observed when running the motor is it constantly drainin drops of water on the hose of coolant reservoir even when the motor is cold or just newly started..also my exhaust pipe is blowing white smoke even when motor has reached the 80 to 90deg working temp...but i ignore that because there might be some oil deposits caused by the loos cyl ang piston ring before i overhauled it...the water exit ports has no thermostatic restrictor already and i set them aside as one of the cause of problem of circulation..im very much hoping that its not my cyl head that causes it...
ANY OTHER INPUTS PLEASE...AT LEAST I CAN TRY BEFORE I RE OPEN MY CYL HEAD...I AM ON A POINT OF NO RETURN NOW BECAUSE I ALREADY SPENT TO MUCH ON PARTS COST, NOT KNOWING THAT MY MOTOR IS TO BAD THAN I EXPECTED..I SHOULD JUST BOUGHT SURPLUS ONE, IF I ONLY KNEW...
 

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i think i found the cause of water dripping in the reservoir hose even on cold engine(I HOPE!), i discovered that the radiator i bought in the surplus part supplier has an incompatible cap, the spring loaded seal that should seal the inner lip of the radiator mouth is not even touching it(too short)..i let the suplier replace it with the right one...i hope this will fix the problem of water circulation since constant water discharge may contribute to a vapor build up(by not reaching the right pressure w/ respect to the operating temp) inside the water jackets and may result to unefficient pumping of the water pump...Still very much hoping that its not a cracked cyl head..Ill let you know guys if it is solved..
 

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i think i found the cause of water dripping in the reservoir hose even on cold engine(I HOPE!), i discovered that the radiator i bought in the surplus part supplier has an incompatible cap, the spring loaded seal that should seal the inner lip of the radiator mouth is not even touching it(too short)..i let the suplier replace it with the right one...i hope this will fix the problem of water circulation since constant water discharge may contribute to a vapor build up(by not reaching the right pressure w/ respect to the operating temp) inside the water jackets and may result to unefficient pumping of the water pump...Still very much hoping that its not a cracked cyl head..Ill let you know guys if it is solved..
hi jtilano828 i'm having the same problem on our minivan, our boss bought it recently and after 2 months of using it we're now having the same problem you had... were you able to solve it..? what did you do..? tia
 

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Greetings! As hard as it may be, you must read all the post about overheating to solve problem. ALSO coolant MUST be in system, something like Preston will do.
You CAN NOT just put water in it and expect it to be OK. It will not be OK with water only. :eek:
 

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Cars need thermostats here in the Philippines and the rest of the world.
I have been a master certified ASE service tech for over 25 years.
I have heard filippino mechanics say "we don't need thermostats its cold in japan"
This statment is FALSE!

isporttrak's comment
"just remove it anyway we have a hot weather so no problem with cold starts (which is what the thermostat's purpose is for)"


this is rubbish and untrue!

Please read about thermostats before you post "your opinion"
A thermostat that is used in automobiles uses an internal combustion engine to regulate the flow of the coolant. When the thermostat is open, the coolant passes through the cylinder head where it looses the heat the air that flows through it. A water pump that is driven from the engine will propel the coolant around the system. When the thermostat is closed the flow is then prevented and the engine is then allowed to heat up to its optimum temperature.

A thermostat operates mechanically. It makes use of a wax pellet which is inside a sealed chamber. The wax is solid at low temperatures but when the engines heats up the wax will then melt and expand. The sealed chamber has an expansion provision that operates the rod that will open a valve when the operating temperature is exceeded. However, the operating temperature is fixed, but it is also determined by the specific composition of the wax. Therefore thermostats of this type can maintain different temperatures, often in the range of 70 degC to 90 degC, which is 160 to 200 degF.

Modern engines are run at over 80 degC or 180 degF, which is quite hot, but it is in order to run more efficiently and to reduce the emission of pollutants. A lot of thermostats contain a small hole in which they vent any gas that might get into the system. In other words, if air is introduced during the coolant replacement. Modern cooling systems contain a relief valve in the form of a spring-loaded radiator pressure cap, that has a tube leading to a partially filled expansion reservoir. Because of the high temperature, the cooling system becomes pressurized to a maximum that is set by the relief valve. The additional pressure will then increase the boiling point of the coolant and that would be above that of the atmospheric pressure.

Just wanted to clear this up for all the mechanics out there who think we dont need thrmostats.
Thanks
sir,

that is one of my concern since when we open the part where thermostat was located, thermostat wasn't there and said it is OK since we are hot in here... so he did some electrical modification of my fan to turn it always and my temp gauge was hardly going up to 1/4 point on panel...

i'm from cebu and after reading this forum, i want to install thermostat and re-wire my radiator fan... mine was rear engine scrum 660cc... hope you can help me with some advice....

and also it consumes more gasoline that was not really what i wanted to have... im new to this car and this is my first ride...
 
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