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Discussion Starter #1
Good day all I have been looking at some manual winching techniques and I have some questions that I would like some insight to. I have a come along also called a manual hoist and I would like to know if this could be used to winch my jimny as i dont have an electrical winch on my car. If anyone has used this technique or has any other method to share please do as I am open to any help.
 

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What kind of 'come-along'? If you mean the standard stamped steel version, it is good for getting the rig onto a trailer or out of a dry ditch. But if you intend to get stuck in the mud, or even hung up 'good' on a rock trail then I would look into something a little more hefty.
I am not against manual winches, I have one of my own for emergencies. I keep it more as a 'second winch' for more tricky situations. Usually involving rescuing Jeep owners that have done something stupid...
A standard model will more likely fail at the wrong moment. They are just not made for so much load.

Here is what I use, next to a normal 'come-along'.


Here is an article I did when I first got mine. When budget is lower than a winch package would cost, this is the answer.
The More Power Puller
 

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Discussion Starter #5
cool thats what i wanted to hear thanks bro all i have to do is get a thirty foot length of chain installed tomorrow and ill be set I'll let you know how it holds out when I get it out to test
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey do you or anyone else know about sealing the diffs from water intrusion in a water crossing. I have a general idea to put a hose over the diff breather nipple and run it to the inside of the car but the thing is if i am doing this do i need to remove the cap on the nipple as this would compromise the seal or not all advice would be nice and taken into consideration.
 

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If you use a hose, you will have to remove the cap, spring and disk. Realize that you will still have to keep an eye on your oil consistancy in the housings. Although the breathers will be relocated (extended hoses), you will still get water intrusion at the hub seals. As long as the axles rotate within the seal, water will find its way past. When the oil looks muddy, change it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
ok with that in mind do you think its worth the effort to install the hose and remove the cap if there is going to be water intrusion anyway. Will there be an advantage to installing this set up
 

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The advantage to the hoses isn't as much to keep water out as much as it is to control the the expanding and contracting of the oil.
When the gears heat up, the oil and air expands and wants to get out. While driving down the road this is controlled by allowing the heated air inside the housing to escape up top. If you are on the trail with the front tires up on a waterfall, the air tube becomes a spout that leaks oil as the axle is rotated back. The air pocket isn't always up when articulating (or rolling). If you run a hose up into the body, incorporate a coil (loop) in the hose to capture the oil.

Does that make sense?
 

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What he said ^^
It is possible to use a Hi Lift or Jackall,
some call it a farmer's jack, as a hand
winch.
These jacks have optional equipment
allowing this application.
Having used a jack this way here are
some warnings.
..secure the jack to chain or tug straps
with bolts or clevis, both ends.
..wear gloves
..get everyone to stand clear of action.
..keep jack's action out of mud or sand.
..don't be in a hurry.
Works good in an emergency.
arlo
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for this i saw a farmers jack 60 inch for sale so i think ill pick it up and be the only one in my crew to have manual winches as their primary winching source LOL
 
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