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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #1
I've just driven down the A1 and been stuck in traffic jams several times. The next day I lifted the bonnet on my 2009 GV Ddis to find that at the top of the radiator a hose link had leaked and sprayed the engine compartment. My first thought was "I probably need to change the thermostat" but finding it on the diesel isn't easy.(even though I've got the manual on the computer)

Am I right that if I stand facing the rad and follow the tubing from the top right of the rad to the back right of the block low down I will find the thermostat housing under the EGR hose?
 

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Did you encounter excessive temperature gauge readings as well?

Sounds more like a degradation in hose condition (leak) as opposed to a thermostat issue, from what little you have offered us in symptoms. 馃槈
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #3
I don't remember seeing anything unusual in the temperature gauge but I'm thinking that the hose link at the top of the rad may have been the hottest place and the weakest link.
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Max has now got me thinking and I've been out to take another look at the hoses. It may be time here for a cry of "mea culpa" or the equivalent of the soldier giving himself a self inflicted injury in order to get out of the action. How does this sound re hose degradation ... In the recent past in order to slow down the rust on the hose clips I confess to having painted rust killer on them ... And of course that's a weak acid ... So, Max, take a bow! I'll try changing the hoses and clips. Thanks again. Tony
 

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It's worth a shot. 馃槈
 

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Yes the thermostat is in a stupid position, I'd leave it alone if possible.

97702
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, Darrell, this photo is just what I needed and I'll accept your advice to leave it alone. I shall try snipping an inch off the expansion hose that was leaking and report back to the forum in due course.
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #8
I ran the car for a while to get it to operating temperature and noted that the hot coolant was getting round to the top of the rad but the fans were not coming on. Checked with the computer manual which told me to check the main fuses and relays. Couldn't find any blown fuses and after lots of head scratching I found the four relays at the front on the battery side of the car in a small black box near to the rad. I printed out the computer instructions on how to check the operation of the relays and "Hey Presto!" the brown five pin Denso was showing continuity when it shouldn't have. I ordered two of these on EBay (used) but will check them before installation and hopefully the fans should then come on to assist the cooling. Was pleased that I seem to have found the fault but then wondered why the relay should fail ... any thoughts from you brethren?
 

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Relays fail.....they are a mechanical component

You can buy them new from any decent auto electric place, pretty standard relay.
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #10
Update as follows: Have removed old radiator & while it was out I replaced the timing belt and water pump (118, 000 miles). Installed new radiator. Found four relays on passenger side of front engine compartment (RHD car) three of which are green four pin and one brown Denso five pin. The three four pins seem to react as they should according to the manual but the five pin Denso didn't so am awaiting Denso 156700-1700 from China. There is 12v getting to all four relays. Tested cooling fans using the aircon switch and they do come on to make cold air for the air con but haven't come on when engine has been left running to high temperature (which is what I'm after). I'm still not sure if the problem is the Denso relay or the temp switch which is attached to the thermo housing on the back of the engine. Now thinking of removing bits of the egr tubing to get my big hand into the small space to remove plug for temp switch. If I joined the circuit in that sensor and the fans came on it would point to the temp sensor being at fault. I keep wondering when the engineers switched the F9QB engine round, why on earth didn't they cut an inspection panel into the bulkhead. Suggestions on how to get access with large hands would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #11
I have now put in a new brown Denso relay. The info about testing the two types of relay (four pin v five pin) that is on the computer manual is confusing in that they describe one of the three relays as having five pins when the reality on my 2009 Ddis is that three are of the four pin variety with an extra relay (brown Denso) that is five pin.
Decided to try and get the coolant sensor out of the thermo housing at the back of the block. Removed the battery and trays plus some plastic tubing leading to the turbo inlet on the left. With sons help with torch I managed to get my big hand in from the right (battery side) and pulled the plastic locking tab and got the sensor out. Have tried to test the resistance, as per advice on the net. This has a two pole sensor that doesn't send readings to the dashboard and really difficult to test with multimeter crocodiles in the space of the plug. Should be 2.5ohms when cold and reducing to 0.24ohms in hot water but struggling to assess properly.
Have sent for a new two pole sensor and will update everyone when I get it back together.
Also found that the relay on my Ddis is the old two pole type so I can't use the new four pin variety.

pics attached re access, etc



 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #12
While waiting for the sensor to arrive in the post I did some thinking and realised that if I tried making a circuit at the sensor plug, that was now hanging loose, then it should send a signal to the cooling fans to switch on.

I'm pleased to say that when I tried this, it worked just as I had hoped, so when the sensor arrives all I have to do is get my large hand in there and secure the plastic locking tab ... Watch this space ...
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #13
The two pole coolant sensor has arrived and after a great deal of struggling and various profanities I managed to get it into its place and plugged it in.

This is where the story becomes interesting because the original fault was overheating due to the fans not coming on.

Having reinstalled the battery and refilled the coolant (the level of which hasn't gone down to its previous level ... Poss air lock?) I switched on with fingers crossed. The fans came on immediately with a cold engine and the OBD live data showed a fault on the engine coolant circuit (with zigzag icon on the screen) and the ECT temperature as -"39" with a question mark.

I am now asking myself whether this is due to the computer expecting a different signal of resistance. Do I keep trying to delete the code (P0115 Engine temperature sensor circuit sensor 1) or should I remove the battery terminals hoping for a reset ? Will the computer eventually reset itself or do I need the skills of a professional electrical mechanic to reprogramme the memory.

The sensor was Lucas make, the same size, same two poles, only one way to fit the plug and advertised on EBay as "fits Suzuki" but it didn't come from my Suzuki dealer.

Your ideas are now needed (but at least I do now have fans that work to prevent overheating)
 

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99 Tracker, 5 door, 2L, 4x4
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The reported -39 temp indicates an open sensor circuit.
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #15
After ordering a replacement ECT from Renault I also ordered a set of attachments for my Gunson meter so that I could attache the testing leads to the ECT. While waiting I decided to try and remove the verdigris from the old ECT using vinegar and gentle wire wool. Having cleaned it up (see photo) I tested (not guessed!) a was pleased to find the resistance appeared to change with the heat from the wife's hair dryer. I shall now try refitting it to the car and report the results.
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #16
Hours later there is good news and bad news : the good is that the cleaned up thermostat has made a good connection and the zigzag warning has disappeared from the dashboard; the bad news is that the ECT is held in by a plastic clip plus a small circular rubber seal and to get these to fit and make a waterproof seal is an absolute b.....d. This is why the new thermo housing has been redesigned so that the holding clip just slides in a slot in the plastic housing.

My right arm is skinned and bruised and several times I have reassembled everything and the system has leaked ... So the guy on here who said,"Leave the thermo alone" is very, very right.

If you know any of the Suzuki engineers who decided to turn the FQ9B engine sideways then I do not wish them well!
 

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99 Tracker, 5 door, 2L, 4x4
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Always reinstall with a new "O" ring and silicone grease..
 

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Suzuki GV Ddis 2009
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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
After numerous attempts fiddling around with my right arm round the back of the engine trying to get the plastic locking tab to hold down the coolant sensor, fitting the black plastic tubing for the turbo air intake, temporarily installing the battery to see if the engine will turn over and checking any faults on the OBD reader ... then the result was several puddles of water on my drive as the rear connection kept leaking ... over and over again.

I was grateful for the advice about using silicone grease and a new O ring but still I did not sort it because since I was working blind I didnt know how the locking tab was meant to secure the sensor (even though I'd been the one who had released it several days and several leaks before)

For those of you who end up trying to do this on the older GV like mine (2009) the important bit of info that you need to take in is that the plastic locking tab slides into a slot in the circular "well" that holds the sensor. I had mistakenly been trying all kinds of positions and methods and wasn't aware of this slot (the new thermostat housing has a similar slot cut into it but uses a spring metal locking tab to secure the sensor.)

I was very close to trying to undo the circlips on the four tubes that feed the thermo housing and then trying to undo the three screws that hold it to the block (all on the back of the block with minimal space) in an attempt to get it water tight. If you use the new thermo housing at least that way the sensor can be locked in from the start unlike my poor attempts.

Lets put it this way ... its not a job I want to do again in a hurry!
 
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