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Discussion Starter #1
I have hinted that I have this idea bouncing around on a couple of other threads. At least one reader has expressed interest. Writing this down has helped me "fix" the idea a little and might push me to the work stage. I already have a couple of CC modules left from other projects.

There are several after-market cruise controls on the market. One is the Rostra Universal Electronic Cruise Control (Rostra 250-1223) Rostra 250-1223 Universal Cruise Control System From my google'n, it looks to be just over $200 with the controls needed to make it work.

I am fairly cheap minded so when I found I could build a working cruise system that could be sourced almost entirely from a salvage yard, I did. My first installation was in a 1978 GMC motorhome. The local junkyard lists a CC module for about $25, so total cost for a working non-vacuum CC should be well under $75. A lot of the GMC specific write ups concentrate on getting some kind of pulse generator to supply the vehicle speed signal and some kind of control that looks "stock GM."

When looking for good CC donors, you need to understand that most late model cars have moved to computer controlled "fly by wire" throttle systems. On these cars the CC is NOT separate from the ECU/PCU, as most of the parts needed (moving and electronic) are already in the ECU and the throttle body. The up side of this is that the option for CC in these cars is swapping out the stalk with the controls.

The best CC donors are mid 90's up to about 2005 or so... depending on make an model. I choose the Delphi Electo-motor CC due to the numbers found in junkyards and how "simple" they are to connect. plus there was write ups found on the web for this.

You want GM cruise control on your cable driven TB - LS1TECH
Cruise Control System
DSC01758 - My Photo Gallery

Electrical Connections:
A ........ Cruise "ON/OFF" input
B ........ Set/Coast input
C ........ Resume/Accel input
D ........ Brake/Clutch normally closed (12v) input
E ........ Ground
F ........ Switched +12v
G ........ Brake/Clutch normally open (0v) input
H ........ Cruise inhibit signal
J ........ Cruise engaged signal
K ........ VSS signal

I built a test rig so I could test all the parts needed for my motorhome before installing them. Being a much older design than the TracKick, it need more parts. I really shouldn't have bothered as all the parts seem to work just fine right from the junkyard. But now that I have it, I am going to modify it for use to ensure the CC modules will work with the Suzuki VSS. From what I have read... the VSS/CC modules should work fine together.

My thoughts one each pin:

A. Cruise "ON/OFF": From pin F, but through a On/Off switch (with indicator) on the dash.

B. Set/Coast: From pin A, through a push button switch or N.O. remote relay. Works as a "Set decel" button

C. Resume/Accel: From pin A, through a push button switch or N.O. remote relay.

D. NC Brake/Clutch: Can be used as a "coast feature" From pin A, through a push button switch or N.C. remote relay. Of course it could also be wired to the brake and or clutch as the designers intended. (The GM OEM set up does NOT have a cruise on/off switch and is always powered, so they needed a back-up method of de0egageing the CC if something happened to the brake light circuit.)

E. Ground: Find a handy ground point. There is one right next to the stock CC module location.

F. 12v Hot in run: Switched (acc) power, The stock CC uses power from fuse __

G. N.O. Brake signal: NEEDS to sense ground (through brake light bulbs) and have +12v when brakes are applied.

H. Cruise inhibit: Most official documentation says this PCM signal is sometimes needed depending on year make and model of the donor vehicle. I have been told this can just be grounded and it will work just fine. From my testing I have found it to be true, But I normally pull units from trucks and these are reported not to use this signal. Another source states: "... 99-up f-body needs this to work... "

J. Cruise engaged: While not needed for actual use it can be wired into the light on the dash. (i need to check if this is +12v or a ground... both CC module side and TracKick side.)

K. VSS input: From VSS generator in the cluster. (yellow wire)

As you can see, other than the Set/decel, Resume/Accel and coast controls, there are only 3 connections (plus grounds) into the stock harness that HAVE to be connected. (Power, Brake and VSS) Plus one or two "optional" connections. (N.C. Brake or clutch and the CC engaged light.) If your TracKick has the stock CC wiring (most do) almost all these connections are right there, on a single connector, just above the driver's right foot. I THINK I have id'd a plug that will just plug into the stock CC wiring. (At least for 4 speed automatic models... the CC "computer" is different on these.) I just need to look though the junk yard and find a connector to be sure. It found, this add on "junk yard" CC could be -almost- plug and play!

Power does need to go through a switch of some kind on the dash. You could use a stock TracKick CC power switch or a toggle switch. On my motorhome I used a toggle with indicator light, mounted were I could reach it easily and fast. I did not want any uncontrolled acceleration issues. (like Toyota)

Cruise Control Control Switches:
As long as you are NOT wiring in a true "coast" button, you could use any control switches that provide two N.O. connections that can be wired to deliver +12v pulses to the CC module. IE: Most GM controls and a majority of after-market controls. Lack of a true "coast" button, isn't THAT big of a deal... you can tap the brake. But That would require me to move my foot rather than a finger!

My plan is to use a remote control relay module like this one from Dino Direct:
Zrabra Wireless 4CH Multifunctional Relay Module & 4 Button Car Remote Control Kit XY-K4-DC+RD090 - DinoDirect.com
Zrabra DC 12V Wireless Remote Control Switch Module & 4 Button Car Wireless Remote Control AK-RK04S-12+AK-JF04 - DinoDirect.com
Don't you love the language and syntax of the descriptions? But I can't even say/write anything in Chinese so why would I expect better the other way around? (Fair is fair!)

I used the one in the 1st link on my motorhome and have the 4 channel remote taped to the steering wheel. The remote in the 2nd link LOOKS like it has a better layout for this use, and it is only a dollar more. The remote module could be mounted in a plastic box and attached to the CC module. The wiring would be very short. Power and ground connections could be the same as what feeds the CC module.

Hardware Connections:
As long as the cable is long enough I'd try and mount the CC module in one of the stock locations above the left front wheel, routing the cable though the same grommet in the firewall used for the stock CC. On the wide bodied Sport model, the CC module could be mounted on the shock tower support allowing for a slightly shorter cable. I have seen a few stock modules mounted on the right side of the engine bay but that location look like it would need WAY too much cable length.

You could connect the cable directly to the throttle body (like on GM vehicles) or to the throttle petal like the TracKick (Suzuki) stock set up. It LOOKS to me like it would be easier to connect to the petal, but would require a longer cable and some way to mount that end of the cable housing. The TracKick has a large support tube under the bottom lip of the dash that looks like it would be a good mount for the the cable housing. The later ones ('96) also have a plate, with holes already there, just inboard of the gas petal that could also be used. Note that it isn't totally necessary to mount the cable right at the end of the housing.

I still haven't decided how to make the cable connection to the petal. Could be a beaded chain, like on my motorhome, or a just bolt with a couple of lock nuts. Depends on the end of the longest cable I find. (Even a big ZIP tie would work... for a while.) OBTW: I understand that the cables can be swapped from module to module, but haven't tried it.

I'll update as I actually do something. :rolleyes:
 

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Subscribing to this thread.

Thank you m000035 for this. I have a an old audiovox cruise control ccs100 installed on my tracker, but I believe the control unit is defective. I like your idea, and it looks like there is enough info that I could re-use all the wiring from my install and come close to just dropping in one from a yard. With the added benefit of going electric instead of vacuum.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That isn't a stock system. It looks after-market. You would need to know who made it to figure out how to connect it and what other parts you need to install it.

I bought a GM/Delphi unit from the junk-yard today (from a 2000 Malibu) for less than $30. As far as these units go, it is the smallest form factor, is the most advanced and has a cable over 5 foot long. I also got almost 5 feet of wire and a bracket with it. Switches plus bits and pieces should put the complete parts list under $50.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just as an update:

I have confirmed that the VSS in the speedometer does put out a signal that is usable by the GM/Delphi unit from the junkyard.

I modified my test set to use an input from the yellow wire from the VSS to the transmission and engine computers. TCU/ECU. The only issue I had was my tester was connected to the brake light circuit and blew the fuse. I have ordered some remote control units to use as set/excel/coast buttons. I'll put one in a '92 4 door auto without any CC wiring, and a '96 Sport (auto) that does have cc wiring.

That should let us know how difficult this addition would be for most TracKicks out there.

More updates as time/parts allow.
 

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thanks for the update.

One of the things I was worried about in your project is the Pulse Per Minute (PPM) expected by the Delphi unit, vs what our Tracker VSS's put out.

When I installed my aftermarket cruise, I had to tell that unit what PPM to expect via its switches.

I dont know if your bench test actually confirmed that the PPM was good, or just confirmed a signal (regardless of correct PPM) was received? What are your thoughts on this?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
... I dont know if your bench test actually confirmed that the PPM was good, or just confirmed a signal (regardless of correct PPM) was received? What are your thoughts on this?
I just know that what ever the PPM, the signal works. My "bench test" consisted of tapping the yellow wire from the VSS and feeding it to my test box (and unmodified right to the GM/Delphi CC unit) and hanging the output cable from the grab handle over the passenger door. Then I took a drive. The cable would pull as expected as I decreased my speed and would go slack as I went faster. Just like it does in my motorhome. Also sometime in the past, I had read that the PPM was the same, I just needed to verify it. :cool:

I did find that some of the "later" GM/Delphi CC units from CARS have and issue with the CC inhibit input signal. The earlier units and the later units from TRUCKS do not seem to use this input. (There are sites with more information about this "inhibit signal" on the web.) The cables on the later units are VERY easy to swap from one to the other. (I haven't been able to do this on the early units, but it LOOKS possible.) So if looking for parts, I would "pick" the unit from a truck or van, but get the longer cable from a car with the cc unit mounted on the passenger side fender. (2000 Malibu's and the like.) I'd also get the wiring and bracket from the same car. The wiring runs from the cc unit to the right headlight, then behind the grille to the left headlight and into the main harness. Cutting the "pigtail" at the left headlight gives at least 6 feet of wire for use. You shouldn't have to splice in any additional wiring making for a cleaner installation.

OBTW: What I call "early units" have "feet" cast into the case. The newer units are smaller and are mounted to different types of brackets depending on application. Both types use the same electrical plug and have the same pin-outs.

My remote control units are being shipped from China. Past experience with this says it'll be about a month... :huh: Oh well... I still have a motor to connect in the Sport... I need to find the bolts for the torque converter that I removed last summer!

More updates sometime.....
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I received the remote control units that I plan on using in my Junkyard CC system.



There are more pictures, including the testing of the Sidekick VSS, are on my blog... no reason to clutter up this thread until I have everything figured out.
Mike's Projects: Juckyard CC update
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have installed, tested and finally got the CC working in my 4 door, 16v, 4 speed auto, 1992 Sidekick. This car did not come with any wiring for a stock CC unit.

I have also documented it on my blog, but it is pretty much what I am posting here: Mike's Projects: August 2014

During preliminary testing, I had already tapped into the signals for VSS and brake lights at the transmission computer connector. All I needed was power (tapped into the cigarette lighter) and ground. (Used a handy screw that contacted the metal structure under the dash.) All the other connections were in the harness I made up connecting the CC unit to the remote.



CC unit Electrical Connections:
A ........ Cruise "ON/OFF" input
B ........ Set/Coast input
C ........ Resume/Accel input
D ........ Brake/Clutch normally closed (12v) input
E ........ Ground
F ........ Switched +12v
G ........ Brake/Clutch normally open (0v) input
H ........ Cruise inhibit signal
J ........ Cruise engaged signal
K ........ VSS signal

Pins A and F plus power for the remote came from the cigarette lighter through a toggle switch on the dash. This switch is more of "positive shut off" safety item and really could be left on all the time. In fact the cc is always powered in most applications and needs to see the brake being applied a few times before the cc will engage. This same power is also routed to the "common" contact of the relays A, B and C on the remote. (relay D is unused.)





Pin B is connected to the normally open (NO) contacts of the relay "B" in the remote unit. To set the cc, or slow down, press the "B" button on the remote.

Pin C is connected to the normally open (NO) contacts of the relay "A" in the remote unit. To resume cruise, or accelerate, press the "A" button on the
remote.

Pin D is connected to the normally closed (NC) contacts of the relay "C" in the remote unit. To disengage (coast), press the "C" button on the remote.

Pin E, ground, is connected to the other items needing ground and then connected to a grounded screw under the dash.

Pin G is connected to the brake lights. I tapped this wire at the transmission computer. (Green wire)

Pin H, Cruise inhibit signal, is left unconnected with this CC unit. I have read that there are units that require a digital signal before the cc will engage (mostly in later model car CC units.... just before the CC was integrated into the PCU.) All of the units I have tested work by leaving disconnected or grounded. My tester has open, 12v and ground capabilities for this line.

Pin J, Cruise engaged signal, is also left unconnected. I understand there is a CC light in the TracKick cluster but haven't researched/tested if I can make it work with a GM CC unit. i suspect so...

Pin K is connected to the vehicle speed sensor (VSS) from the speedometer cluster. I tapped this wire at the transmission computer. (yellow wire)



This picture shows the jumper on the remote unit that needed to be removed to make the remote work as momentary switches. As delivered, it worked as one press on, one press off.... not what i needed!

I clamped the CC cable to the dash structure just inboard of the gas petal. I connected it to the petal with zip ties. (Come on, this _IS_ just a test of concept!)



You can also see the scotch locks I used to tap the wires at the transmission computer. Sharp eyed readers might notice the wire color swap at the connectors above the cable clamp. I had made a mistake when making my "harness" and connected a green wire on the CC pigtail from Pin K to a green wire I had expected to connect to the brake lights. (Green in the TracKick harness) It should have been to the yellow wire, to match the yellow VSS wire in the Sidekick....



Oh well... I do not think anyone else will be working on it anyway.

After getting the CC to work, I moved the CC unit under the driver's seat and strapped it to the jack handle.



I still haven't taped the remote to the steering wheel, but as my son is currently driving this "Kick" it isn't a problem. He doesn't like to use cruse and isn't driving very far anyway... just 5 miles to work.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OBTW: total cost for the parts for this project... less than $50.
 

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That is a nice Proof of Concept project.

I still need to find myself a CC unit from a yard myself. If/when i do this, I am going for a connection at the MFI Throttle body instead of the accelerator pedal, but your work should be translatable for me. Thanks again for documenting this.

I have the interface pad from my audiovox cruise control that I will most likely be using instead of the remote, but it will be nice to know the keyfob option has been proven if I ever graduate to that method.

Thanks again, m000035.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'd connect the throttle with the same method that your old audiovox cc uses, to the petal or the throttle body. That way you can re-use the current hardware. If you take and post a picture of that end of the CC cable, I might be able to ID a donor cable that will work with your hardware.

Check your "interface pad" for being normally open (NO) because that is what the GM CC unit expects. IIRC the stock Suzuki Unit uses normally closed (NC) contacts. Honda and Ford (both steering wheel mounted controls) often use a single wire system that gives different resistances depending on the button pushed! This saves on wire count in the clock spring under the steering wheel.
 

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Mike,

Nice Job! I guess once you've done a cruise control in a GMC motorhome the Tracker would be easy.

LOL.

Mark Elmer (Another GMC motorhome owner)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I was asked a question about this junkyard CC system, after typing a reply, I figure it should be here also.

Hi, I read your posts and am wondering if you have a list of junk yard parts (Make and model of vehicle) that I can use to put on my 1995 tracker, 2WD, 5 speed manual transmission. There were 3 trackers at my JY but none had any CC parts. ...
When adding a junkyard CC to something I prefer the smaller more up-to-date Delphi cruise controls from GM vehicles around 2000. Much later they changed away from a throttle cable to "fly by wire" and the cc was integrated into the ECU. Earlier (larger, with feet cast into the case) version will work but they seem to "step" 2 mph rather than 1 mph.

Longer cables and wire harness pig-tails are desired allowing more options for a cleaner install. The 1997–2003 Chevrolet Malibu, Oldsmobile Alero, Oldsmobile Cutlass, Pontiac Grand Am, Oldsmobile Achieva, Buick Skylark and the 2004–2005 Chevrolet Classic all would be good places to look for the wiring and cables. They say that GM trucks of the same era are easier to make work, (due to the inhibit signal used on some cars) but I have not seen a difference.

For control, I use a single toggle switch and a cheap wireless remote module off ebay or an on-line Chinese electronics seller. You could use generic momentary switches.

I THINK that the stock stock switches could be made to work and could possibly be sourced from other models of Suzuki cars. (Or the Suzuki based Geos.)

Please do a little research on what safety features you might need for the clutch. I have only done this in automatic vehicles.

-- note that when harvesting the wire "pig tail" on the recommended cars, I follow the harness around the engine bay... from the passenger side across the front and back the driver's side. THEN cut the whole harness. I can then strip the CC wires from the rest of the harness leaving almost 6 foot long pig-tail wires. No splicing required for most installations.
 

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Thanks for the additional info, Mike.

randy
 
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