Suzuki Forums banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi! I've just moved to US, but my car didn't. Because of the love for my car and recession+bad market in my country this year, I'm planning to bring my 1.3 2008 Jimny to the US soon.
But spare parts availability is a big question for me. I've called a couple of nearby dealers, and they say that they can get spare parts only for cars to be sold in the US.
Many spare parts from the Samurai are compatible though and Jimny is a very reliable car.
Still, can anyone advise if there is a way to get the spare parts shipped from Japan, not European dealers?
Are there any fellow Jimny owners in the US?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
bringing a car to the USA is a expensive task. the car will need to meet safety and emission standards. there are companies around that can help but $$$
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I know of the implications. This an almost new 1.3 liter car, I'm almost sure it meets all the US safety standards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
most new samurai parts that I buy are maruti parts from india. Up untill last year they were still making the Gypsy. Now that Maruti is no longer government held, I don't know if they will continue to make it... I hope they do. I'd like to see them eventually come back to the U.S. especially with that DOHC fuel injected engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
jimny in US..

As much as I'd like to give you good news about bringing your Jimny over here to the US, I don't think it would be worth it.

The costs invloved in getting it through Customs and getting it to meet US specifications would be very high.

There are a LOT of Samurai owners in the US (myself included) who would JUMP at the opportunity to own a Jimny, but those safety standards and memories of the last time Suzuki US introduced competition to the Jeep Wrangler makes that a LONG-SHOT possibility.

Sorry.:mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks

So, you're sure that Jimny won't meet the US safety requirements? I have a friend who is a customs broker who can help me with customs clearing my vehicle.
The biggest challenge for me are the spare parts - I don't want to pay 3x price for importing them from Europe.
Of course it's cool to have a unique car, and I just love it, but common sense tells me that I won't even be able to insure it... or will be forced to pay unreasonably high.
But I'll try to check with insurance companies here in NY, though...
I couldn't find any Jimny owners in US or in Canada, even for the Japanese 0.6 Turbo version...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
So, you're sure that Jimny won't meet the US safety requirements? I have a friend who is a customs broker who can help me with customs clearing my vehicle.
The biggest challenge for me are the spare parts - I don't want to pay 3x price for importing them from Europe.
Of course it's cool to have a unique car, and I just love it, but common sense tells me that I won't even be able to insure it... or will be forced to pay unreasonably high.
But I'll try to check with insurance companies here in NY, though...
I couldn't find any Jimny owners in US or in Canada, even for the Japanese 0.6 Turbo version...
If it were possible at a reasonable price, lots of us crazy Samurai (SJ-413) Fanatics would be doing it!

My direct experience with owning a vehicle that was not purpose-built for use in the US was a 1973 Pinzgauer 710M:



Anyone who wanted one imported from Germany, Austria or Switerland could only buy a unit that was 25 years old or older as specified in a grandfather clause in the US vehicle import regulations. Mine was 26 when I bought it.

Recently, there were several companies importing Kei trucks (eg. Suzuki Carry) from Japan ranging in model years from 1988 to the late 90s. There were a few brand new Kei-type trucks that were imported from China for a while. The US government restricted their use to offroad only. In late 2008, The US government banned Kei trucks altogether. The main reason was that Kei trucks did not meet US automobile safety standards because of their construction.

BTW, Consiracy-Theorists need not stick their oar in this conversation. If Kei trucks were better-designed for for driving in the US than the Pinzgauer 710M, they would still be death-traps. Cute and offroadable as it may have been, that Pinz was one scary-handling vehicle on the Interstate. If anyone saw that episode of Top Gear where the boys were comparing vans, you saw what happened when a Suzuki Carry was driven through a slalom...

I'll happily admit that I may be comparing apples to oranges (Jimny vs Carry) in my above position, but the bottom line is that there are saftey standards in effect in the US that, based on the way us USAens drive our cars -mainly having to do with speed and power - would make it very difficult to successfully import small asian vehicles into the US.

I don't think that a Jimny has much of a chance getting through customs unless you really want to spend huge amounts of money on safety upgrades that may or may not pass the muster.

I am real sorry. :(

PS, I am not afraid to show myself to you all! That's me at the ripe old age of 55.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
You could even stretch the comparison to the Smart car. While still apples and oranges, it's a more current example of small unsafe vehicles being imported to the U.S. It can be done, but the expense of the upgrades is ludicrous and the weight of the vehicle and loss of power due to emission restrictions has crippled the fuel economy of the vehicle. Making it an expensive, not so ecofriendly, poorer handling relative to the original non-U.S. version.

cost difference: $12,000-$24,000 U.S. dollars for european SMART car, $25,000-$30,000 U.S. dollars for an American version of the SMART car.
Fuel efficieancy difference: 46 city, 69 highway for a European SMART car, 33 city 41 highway for a U.S. version.

The U.S. version increases the top-heavieness of an already top-heavy vehicle making the U.S. version less stable but better capable to hold up in a collision. The U.S. safety tests done on the vehicle touting how safe they are were done in a test comparison with a simulated vehicle of the same size. How many people getting in a wreck with their smart car are going to be hit by another smart car? unlikely. The fact that the doors tend to blow off in roll over situations was glossed over by the argument that the vehicles Safety belt should be more than sufficient to hold the occupant in the vehicle without the door in a roll-over. My experiences in roll over situations is that arms and legs tend to find their way outside the vehicle if there are no doors or windows to keep them in. So just a little fuel for the conspiracy theorists, regarding the Large ammount of U.S. dollars invested and the U.S. Chrysler Corp having stake in the vehicle. Even if Jimny was still manufactured by GM and could be fudged through some of the safety tests, the U.S. version would be far more expensive than the $15,000 European version and much heavier and more restrictive in preformance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
If it were possible at a reasonable price, lots of us crazy Samurai (SJ-413) Fanatics would be doing it!

My direct experience with owning a vehicle that was not purpose-built for use in the US was a 1973 Pinzgauer 710M:



Anyone who wanted one imported from Germany, Austria or Switerland could only buy a unit that was 25 years old or older as specified in a grandfather clause in the US vehicle import regulations. Mine was 26 when I bought it.

Recently, there were several companies importing Kei trucks (eg. Suzuki Carry) from Japan ranging in model years from 1988 to the late 90s. There were a few brand new Kei-type trucks that were imported from China for a while. The US government restricted their use to offroad only. In late 2008, The US government banned Kei trucks altogether. The main reason was that Kei trucks did not meet US automobile safety standards because of their construction.

BTW, Consiracy-Theorists need not stick their oar in this conversation. If Kei trucks were better-designed for for driving in the US than the Pinzgauer 710M, they would still be death-traps. Cute and offroadable as it may have been, that Pinz was one scary-handling vehicle on the Interstate. If anyone saw that episode of Top Gear where the boys were comparing vans, you saw what happened when a Suzuki Carry was driven through a slalom...

I'll happily admit that I may be comparing apples to oranges (Jimny vs Carry) in my above position, but the bottom line is that there are saftey standards in effect in the US that, based on the way us USAens drive our cars -mainly having to do with speed and power - would make it very difficult to successfully import small asian vehicles into the US.

I don't think that a Jimny has much of a chance getting through customs unless you really want to spend huge amounts of money on safety upgrades that may or may not pass the muster.

I am real sorry. :(

PS, I am not afraid to show myself to you all! That's me at the ripe old age of 55.

Good to see you Ack, you look young :)

I'd be surprised to know that the Jimny would pass safety tests of all European countries and Australia, but not the US. Is the US standards that much higher than Europe? I figured it is just a marketing policy by Suzuki, just like many cars in the US are never sold outside of it, such as the Toyota 4Runner and Tundra. The Former has a mechanical replica sold elsewhere, which is the Toyota Prado, but with a different shell. So safety, engine emissions, etc. etc. are all completely identical, just a stupid marketing policy that could involve custom costs.

I'm thinking Suzuki is punishing the US for the easy roll-over report by Consumer reports in the late 80s that significantly slowed down Samurai sales onwards, even after it was cleared.

Baratacus ... very informative thank you very much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
importing non-approved vehicles, continued

We have had the Four-Two in the US for almost a year now. BMW went through a lot of engineering effort get that car to pass our engineering requirements for such an small car. Although they sold like hotcakes (translates to "very fast!") early on, they are not exactly clogging the highways right now. This is possibly because they retail for over $15,000.

That's a lot to pay for such a teeny-tiny car.

One thing folks have to remember - The US is not like Japan, India or other countries where either the population is large or open land is hard to come by. Everything here is big and/or far apart. Large comfortable cars and trucks are the rule not the exception. Driving something small more than 100 miles at a sitting can be very uncomfortable. Because of that, foreign automakers sell large cars here. The large imports in the US are mammoth compared to other vehicles in their originating country.

Is the US government going to allow a small import that could become a deathtrap when involved in an accident? No they will not. Further, auto manufacturers know that nothing kills a vehicle quicker than a poor safety record. The absolute Classic example of that was the Yugo.

Thus all cars, big or small, must be able to take an impact well in an acccident. Crush zones, air bags - things like that are required in New US-marketed vehicles. The Four-Two has them. I suspect that the 2008 Jimny does not since it is not designed for the US market.

Finally, take a look at this video at Ack's FAQ:

Ack's FAQ: Your 4X4 Portal To All Things Suzuki/Geo

The Samurai got it's bad name in the US not at the hands of federal safety requirements at the time. US Government reports on the Samurai's performance were classified as acceptable. It was killed off by a self-serving journalistic organization that passed itself off as a consumer watchdog.

I have a degree in journalism. I work at a TV Station that produces 48 hours of news programming every week. You would think that I would be a champion of journalism. That would be the case EXCEPT for the DESPICABLE, IMMORAL and UNETHICAL behaviour of Consumer Reports!

That's my journalistic side, NOT my Samurai owner's side speaking.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,862 Posts
car DVD player online store

Car DVD GPS Player can play MP4/ DivX/ XviD/ DVD/ CD /VCD / CD/ CD-R/ CD-RW / MP3 with GPS TV FM RDS DVB-T Bluetooth SD Card Amplifier can show the best route to your destination can help you save a lot of time ,especail when you in strange city

Chrysler 300C Car DVD Player with GPS Navigation System 3D Screen Steering wheel control

Product Description:

Touch screen 5.0 Inch 2-DIN TFT LCD Monitor with DVD Player/TV/4*45 amplifier/AM/FM/GPS Built-in/CDC/USB/SD Card
3D menu Operation
ipod ready
Steering wheel control
DVD/VCD/MP3/MP4/DIVX/CD/CD-R/CD-RW/DVD-RW Formats
Dimmer function for night driving
DVD/VCD/CD changer control interface
Multi-channel auto EQ
Auto reverse function when parking
Car clock function
AUX input
Bluetooth build-in
Warranty:One year

car DVD player online store
Wow.
I have seen spam posted on the forums, but this is the first 'spam-jacking' I have seen.

Admins - kill this guys account!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Well why would the Samurai pass, but the Jimny not? The Jimny has far more safety features than the Samurai had when it was around. Did the regulations get stricter since then?

Unfortunately I could not play the video, asking for an audio codec which I don't have :(
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,346 Posts
just read a few pages at NTSHA and EPA, it's all there, and no, it not a problem with just suzuki. (all cars)
and you forget there are still class actions pending and going on Suzuki (jeep like) veh.
Every one will pay ! Not just Suzuki. (
<insert great lawyer joke here> heheheh

In most cases , to bring any new car to the US one must conform to all the NTSHA rules and the EPA rules and to the 50k mile test( alone, that is $4million (ask the Smart car importers how much it cost? , all documented clearly.)
Importing non compliant cars here is complex and very expensive not to mention , not possible in many cases.

Punishing is not the deal, just fly to any country and look.
I fly to SA every year and guess what , only restriction is on displacement.
ever car you can imagine is there, even old 57 chev , and old Toys 60s , 70,s 80s.
Im son in law has turbo 200nx Nissan. He has to pass the inspections.
not for smog, but for tire tread and lousy brakes. (lights too)
I'd like to import some cars from there! but it is impossible. Try it.
Bro.- in- law has GTO in SA.. for dirt cheap. (no rust in South Amer. desert)
$1 /lb to bring it back.
It would never be allowed in. As is.

That comment about Americans wanting, fast heavy cars is true.
4500 lbs and 300 HP. ( gas sucking pigs)
And they set the rules based on the crazy behaviour. ( it's not EU here)
It will change and soon.
Non-renewable resources ,dictate that.
When its all gone, every one will blame the car makers for not making , efficient cars.
Never will they blame them selves. ( they demanded it and bought it and drove it)

It is a huge committment bring a new car to this country.
besides the Gov, bs, there is parts, training, and the potential of the customers changing their minds and making all this , a waste of time and money.
Not to mention the gov. jerking the rug from under you.
Next the the carbon Cap and trade rug.

that is my take on that. hope it helps.

happy holidays and happy kicking.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,346 Posts
yes, the regulations are stricter and will get more so.
for ever.
its like a tug of war.

customer wants big, heavy and powerful cars.
EPA wants low grams per mile.
NTHSA wants less highway deaths.

all pulling in opposite directions. (but fun to watch)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
I was just digging for news on possibility of the Jimny coming to the US(found no news of it being even a remote possibility) and found this old thread.

To answer Alt's question on safety standards, the US is different, and that is the reason a car can pass in other countries and not here. The standards may or may not make a car truly safer(compared to European standards), but they have to be followed nonetheless.

A case in point was the Holden Monaro, which is an Australian car. To be imported into the US(as the Pontiac GTO), the fuel tank had to be relocated to the trunk, so that it would be greater than a certain distance from the rear bumper. This served to make a generously sized trunk suddenly become pretty small. Putting a fuel-tank into the interior of the vehicle is hardly safer than leaving it outside the interior shell and a little closer to the bumper, but it was the cheapest/quickest way to meet the standard, so GM did it.

As for the Samurai, it had very minimal standards to pass up until 1996. 1996 would have forced a redesign of the Samurai to meet new crashworthiness standards as well as the new OBDII engine control and monitoring standards. That, IMO, is what truly killed the Samurai in the US, as Suzuki kept it coming, even as sales dropped to virtually nothing, until the tightening standards would have forced an expensive redesign for a market that had died.

I believe that it probably would not take too much to make the Jimny pass US standards, but whatever it takes seems too much for Suzuki to do it. That is too bad, because a new Jimny is the one vehicle I would consder buying new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
When I went to El Paso on January, I noticed that there are some Mexican cars with Mexican plates driving around there. I thought, if a Mexican car can drive into the US and drive around, why not import it to Mexico and then drive it to the US? I'm sure Mexico has less stringent regulations regarding car imports. Probably a naive question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
I have no idea what it would take for a US citizen to import and register a vehicle in Mexico. Probably doable with the right application of money...

Once all of that was accomplished, one could drive it in the US, but it would be at least as illegal as driving a vehicle registered in another state, in your state of residence. Most states have laws stating that you have to register your vehicles in that state, if you are living there.

One would certainly need to reseach the laws on the matter, so that you'd know what you are risking.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,862 Posts
Maybe if you lived outside the city limits you might get away with it, but they actually have a reward system here that pays folks that turn you in for doing that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
I have no idea what it would take for a US citizen to import and register a vehicle in Mexico. Probably doable with the right application of money...

Once all of that was accomplished, one could drive it in the US, but it would be at least as illegal as driving a vehicle registered in another state, in your state of residence. Most states have laws stating that you have to register your vehicles in that state, if you are living there.

One would certainly need to reseach the laws on the matter, so that you'd know what you are risking.
I rented a car in Houston that had Vermont license plates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Maybe if you lived outside the city limits you might get away with it, but they actually have a reward system here that pays folks that turn you in for doing that.
Ouch! That's nasty!

There should be some kind of law that permits them to drive inside the US for a certain amount of time, otherwise why would they even let them in through the border?
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top