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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to find a front skid plate that covers the area from beneath the front bumper and extends only to the front axle. Given my particular use and the area I will be in, I cannot use the more common, larger underbody skid plates.

I haven't found anything domestically, but did find this one. The price is high and shipping will be $$ but it looks like what I need. Anyone know of a domestic source???

Any and all thoughts appreciated.

Here it is:

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Here is the translation from Google:

This fantastic slide duralumin will allow you to address the real off-road without risking bending the bar or wrench the steering damper from their supports, in addition to offering a truly captivating design front.
NB: This slide paratiranteria mounts easily on the original Suzuki SJ 410-413-Samurai 1000-1300 Spanish, Japanese and Canadians.
Monta well even on the Suzuki SJ 410-413-Samurai 1000-1300 Spanish, Japanese and Canadians with installed kit Zanfi.it 2.5 "parabolic semicircle.
Absolutely not mount with systems Shacle Reverse, and with over 2.5 Zanfi.it Kit ", there will be interference from the high excursion from these dates Kit
With the kit offered by other companies will have fewer problems, but the interference that you will not know.
E 'can still thick media, to conform to interference from small kits with more travel.

Mounts easily in minutes.

Price includes the complete kit that includes:

- The sleigh.
- Support in iron powder coated.
- All hardware necessary for correct fitting.


Here is the pdf for the installation:

http://www.zanfi.it/modules/catalog/images/istruzioni/istruzioni_slitta_paratiranteria.pdf

Thanks,
Bruce
 

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are you kidding me? You're going to pay for a 200 dollar plate of aluminum plus shipping from italy? It's just a piece of 1/8" aluminum alloy with a hole cut in it for the tow hook. You could probably take that PDF to a fabricator shop and show them the pictures... They could bend you a piece from their scrap bin that would fit in about 5 minutes using nothing but a hand brake. You could probably bend it yourself with a bench vise and some 2x4s. The brackets and hardware you can get from Home Depot. The whole project should cost you less than 30 bucks.
 

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SJ413 (Samurai) skidplates

I have seen several skidplate systems for the Suzuki IFS trucks (Sidekick/Tracker/Vitara) but nothing for the SJ front suspension.

Because of all the moving parts that cross the entire front end, most folks do not try to protect it with a skidplate. The alternative solution is to install a high steering kit (often referred to as an OTT steering system) which moves the tierod and the draglink above the centerline of the axle. OTT systems also eliminate bumpsteer on SPring Over Axle (SPOA) suspension lifts.

This is followed by installing differential armor like ZOR's Crabs:



More information on crabs can be found at:
ZOR Zuks Off Road

Crabs came to mind first because Myron turns out a great product with support before and after the sale. There are other differential armor products available at most aftermarket Suzuki Samurai Vendors...

I have a SPOA suspension with an OTT system on my '88 Samurai. No differential armor, though... :eek:

I hope this helps!
 

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are you kidding me? You're going to pay for a 200 dollar plate of aluminum plus shipping from italy? It's just a piece of 1/8" aluminum alloy with a hole cut in it for the tow hook. You could probably take that PDF to a fabricator shop and show them the pictures... They could bend you a piece from their scrap bin that would fit in about 5 minutes using nothing but a hand brake. You could probably bend it yourself with a bench vise and some 2x4s. The brackets and hardware you can get from Home Depot. The whole project should cost you less than 30 bucks.
+1 - wow.... that is crazy expensive for what you get. if something like that was popular I am surprised a us vendor doesn't already make it. No way could they sell it at that price though.
It kinda reminds me of the skid olate thingy a person sees on the little toyota prerunner trucks.
 

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are you kidding me? You're going to pay for a 200 dollar plate of aluminum plus shipping from italy? It's just a piece of 1/8" aluminum alloy with a hole cut in it for the tow hook. You could probably take that PDF to a fabricator shop and show them the pictures... They could bend you a piece from their scrap bin that would fit in about 5 minutes using nothing but a hand brake. You could probably bend it yourself with a bench vise and some 2x4s. The brackets and hardware you can get from Home Depot. The whole project should cost you less than 30 bucks.
I would say that's quite a bit thicker than 1/8" and it's also not just any ordinary aluminum alloy. Duralumin is a hardened aluminum alloy and it's unlikley that your local fabricator will have it in stock. I also seriously doubt that you'll be bending it with a bench vise and some 2x4s.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would say that's quite a bit thicker than 1/8" and it's also not just any ordinary aluminum alloy. Duralumin is a hardened aluminum alloy and it's unlikley that your local fabricator will have it in stock. I also seriously doubt that you'll be bending it with a bench vise and some 2x4s.

This was very helpful. So, we are back to my original question: Will this help? My issue is that during the Summer, in particular, I am often forced to drive through thick, high grasses which completely hide the numerous streep stumps in the area. Not infrequently, I discover the stump by hitting it head one. I want to do what I can to limit any damage that may result.

Ack's suggestion (which I greatly appreciate) of installing the crabs is one that I may do. I am wondering if this skidplate would help prevent or lessen damage from some of the stumps I do encounter. If it would help, then I am willing to pay the price for the skid plate--even if some of you think it is expensive. Lost days of work are far more costly to me that the one-time price of the part. I wonder if a couple of you have ever heard of a false economy???

Bruce
 

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Will it help ? I'd say yes, but, I'm tempted to tell you to do like Baratacus suggested - take the PDF to a local metal shop and ask them if they can fab something similar for you and get a price quote.

It doesn't have to be duralumin - steel sheet can be used - although duralumin would have the advantages of being lighter and possibly stronger.

Steel is strong, but heavy; regular aluminum - in my opinion - tends to bend and because it is soft, if you were to hit a hard object, for example, a rock, you'll find that the rock ploughs a groove into the soft metal, duralumin is light, very stiff and very hard, and quite possibly ideal for a skidplate - if weight is a concern.

6mm (approximately 1/4") is the number I see most frequently when skidplates are being discussed, regardless of steel or aluminum
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you, Fordem.

I appreciate your help and your willingness to share your expertise.

All The Best,
Bruce
 

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skidplate

I actually bothered to take a look at the pdf document - something that I neglected to do in the first place...

I see exactly what it does and how it might help you.

Such an arrangement would not do very well on an offroading vehicle where the operator can see the terrain in front of him/her.

I guess that's what I get for thinking "inside the box" - the box being the offroading viewpoint.

I am not familiar with duralumin but, from the pictures, it looks like it might do the job if it does not hit anything at a high speed.

Personally, I would use 1/4" steel. Sure it would weigh a lot but it would be stouter. Speed and performance is not your problem, it's the danged stumps that you can't see!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I actually bothered to take a look at the pdf document - something that I neglected to do in the first place...

I see exactly what it does and how it might help you.

Such an arrangement would not do very well on an offroading vehicle where the operator can see the terrain in front of him/her.

I guess that's what I get for thinking "inside the box" - the box being the offroading viewpoint.

I am not familiar with duralumin but, from the pictures, it looks like it might do the job if it does not hit anything at a high speed.

Personally, I would use 1/4" steel. Sure it would weigh a lot but it would be stouter. Speed and performance is not your problem, it's the danged stumps that you can't see!
Exactly! I am going to look into this. I am also going to look into your idea of installing crabs.

In the past when I have hit a log or stump that was hidden in the tall grasses, I was travelling between 5-10 MPH (and usually closer to 5). I had no clue that it was there until---BAM!--I hit it. It is amazing to see how much damage a hidden stump or log can inflict.

Bruce
 

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I have seen a few attempts at skidplates like this. Popular rock crawling locations like this area brings out some pretty wild stuff. I like the plate itself, but I don't see how the pre-bent support bracket at the rear can withstand any kind of hit. Unfortunately, you wouldn't figure it out until you whack a stump and the rear of the skid is forced upwards - and into the tie rod - steering is then nonfunctional). And then, once the supports are bent and the skid is higher in relation to the axle, the stump will then whack the axle itself.

This is another example of equipment that works (looks) best for the folks that never leave the street.

Installing a high steer solution to make more room and then designing a crossmember that has a stronger (and straighter) rear support for the skid would be a smarter option. Also, build the rear support to mount to the bottom of the frame and the new crossmember. Don't try using 'tabs' like the Italian design. It doesn't look strong enough to withstand the forces that would be applied.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have seen a few attempts at skidplates like this. Popular rock crawling locations like this area brings out some pretty wild stuff. I like the plate itself, but I don't see how the pre-bent support bracket at the rear can withstand any kind of hit. Unfortunately, you wouldn't figure it out until you whack a stump and the rear of the skid is forced upwards - and into the tie rod - steering is then nonfunctional). And then, once the supports are bent and the skid is higher in relation to the axle, the stump will then whack the axle itself.

This is another example of equipment that works (looks) best for the folks that never leave the street.

Installing a high steer solution to make more room and then designing a crossmember that has a stronger (and straighter) rear support for the skid would be a smarter option. Also, build the rear support to mount to the bottom of the frame and the new crossmember. Don't try using 'tabs' like the Italian design. It doesn't look strong enough to withstand the forces that would be applied.
Thanks, BillJohn.


Among the 10 Billion modifications Brent is doing for me are 1.6 16v engine swap, Old Man EMU suspension system (about a 2 inch lift or so), power steering, ARB lockers, etc.

Does any of this change anyone's advice???

For example, I have no clue how the power steering would affect the height of the steering system--which several of you have identified as an issue.

Thanks again; you guys are terrific.

Bruce
 

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The power steering won't change anythng in relation to the skiplate. It still uses the same tie rod in the same location. Going with the OME set, I am assuming you are keeping the springs under the axle (stock configuration). There may be an issue with any high steer solution.

I suggest you take the PDF to Brent and then show him my suggestions about the rear brace. He can tell you straight out if it will work or not.

Oh, and you are going to love the 16v and the ARB's...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The power steering won't change anythng in relation to the skiplate. It still uses the same tie rod in the same location. Going with the OME set, I am assuming you are keeping the springs under the axle (stock configuration). There may be an issue with any high steer solution.

I suggest you take the PDF to Brent and then show him my suggestions about the rear brace. He can tell you straight out if it will work or not.

Oh, and you are going to love the 16v and the ARB's...

Yes, we are keeping the springs under the axle. And, yes, I will run this all by Brent. Just can't say enough good things about Brent. He has spent enormous time figuring out exactly what I need--and what I don't need or want--for my specific use which is probably different from that of 99% of his customers. I have never worked with a guy who so often and so adamantly will talk me out of things that would make him money. He is the ultimate "customer first" guy.

Bruce

PS What do you think of the suggestion of installing "crabs"?
 

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I have installed both styles of 'diff caps'. The old school 8" pipe cap cut in half as well as the Crabs from ZOR. I know the pipe caps are stronger than the axle itself and the Crabs are a little thinner, so I was worried about the Crabs when I first saw them. But I have installed them on my trail rig and have bashed them into rocks with no ill effects. They may not be as thick, but they are definately tough enough for our Zook axles.
The Crabs are also easier to clean out.

You will probably bend an axle housing before either cap fails to protect.


Crabs?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
BillJohn,

I read the link on your last post. Very good stuff. I assume that you have a website. Can you post the link to your site?

Thanks again,
Bruce
 

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BillJohn,

I read the link on your last post. Very good stuff. I assume that you have a website. Can you post the link to your site?

Thanks again,
Bruce
Sure Bruce.
For awhile, we didn't know if the main site would stick around so I started saving my articles on my personal site. Unfortunately I refer back to that site more than I should now that I know we are out there to stay for awhile longer. The link above is to a spot on my personal site, but you can find that article and many, many others on iZook.

Main Page - iZook
(Currently going through changes)

A few other useful things are on my personal site at:
My Zook Page
 

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Just an FYI on duraluminum. Its just tempered aluminum aloy and most sheet metal fabricators carry several tempers and gauges of it. 1/8 inch plate isn't thin by any means, that's about 11 gauge. Tempered aluminum is lightweight and can take hard impacts from light objects like brush and twigs. When you drop tempered aluminum on a hard rock with the weight of your vehicle behind it, it will not bend. It will crack or tear right at the mounting points. Those are large radius bends and shouldn't be dificult on a bench vise with some steel extensions. Higher than 1/8 inch I wouldn't try it by hand though. I would recommend making the plate out of steel. Less likely to tear. It will dent if you crack it against a rock, but you can pound a dent out. with tempered aluminum, Tearing or cracking the plate means welding... and welding aluminum... not fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Just an FYI on duraluminum. Its just tempered aluminum aloy and most sheet metal fabricators carry several tempers and gauges of it. 1/8 inch plate isn't thin by any means, that's about 11 gauge. Tempered aluminum is lightweight and can take hard impacts from light objects like brush and twigs. When you drop tempered aluminum on a hard rock with the weight of your vehicle behind it, it will not bend. It will crack or tear right at the mounting points. Those are large radius bends and shouldn't be dificult on a bench vise with some steel extensions. Higher than 1/8 inch I wouldn't try it by hand though. I would recommend making the plate out of steel. Less likely to tear. It will dent if you crack it against a rock, but you can pound a dent out. with tempered aluminum, Tearing or cracking the plate means welding... and welding aluminum... not fun.
Thanks Baratacus!

Duraluminum sounds pretty darn impressive. Still, many of you have planted enough seeds in my mind about this particular skidplate (more regarding the design than the material) that I am going to run it by Brent.

Those crabs are another story. Definitely going for them.

Bruce
 
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