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Discussion Starter #1
Good Morning,
I have never had any Suzuki and currently I have a smart in leasing. I live in Germany and I am considering as replacement of Smart a new IGNIs....but I am reading everywhere things that scares me in particular
  • Problems with breaks and Tires which run out too fast
  • Automatic CVT from Jetco7 which breaks/gives problems
  • problems with clutch (is there with CVT also?)
I want to buy it new, and the dream is to use it for next 6/7 years (I do 15.000 per year).
Alternative I am evaluating: Skoda Fabia with DSG, Arona with DSG, new Yaris CVT, if it resists, the Twingo automatic....but all more expensive and not sure if more reliable Frankly speaking.

I would love to know your technical and user experience opinions.
 

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Welcome to this forum.

Most people here are in the UK.

1. I didn't think brakes or tyres were significantly worse than other cars.

2. The CVT model has only just been launched in the UK so no one has any experience of it.

3. I haven't heard of clutch problems.
 

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There are complaints here and there about brake and tyre life. This isn't an unusual complaint for most cars and isn't a wholesale problem. The clutch issue is associated with the clutch / flywheel on the AGS gearbox. This was a significant problem but the AGS gearbox isn't used on the facelift Ignis. Suzuki have used a CVT gearbox on other models so as noted in other posts, it's too early to tell how this gearbox fares in the Ignis. A CVT gearbox would be expected to last100+Kmiles with minimal maintenance required. As you point out, there have been issues in the past with Jatco CVT's fitted to Suzuki and Nissan cars, the fault was pretty specific and should be well sorted by now. Would I have a CVT gearbox? Absolutely not, the constant whine is unpleasant and many cars suffer from jerking and shuddering, overheating and loss of acceleration. Manufacturers fit them because they're more fuel efficient than normal autos and smoother than some autos.

From the cars you mention as an alternative, the Seat Arona stands out. The 1 litre Arona DSG 115SE compares to the Ignis SZ-T. This is a 5 seater (Ignis is 4), 115 BHP vs 82 for the Ignis, O-60 in10 secs, 400 litre luggage space vs 250 for the Ignis. Excellent DSG gearbox vs CVT on the Ignis. Well rated by the press. Fuel consumption is about 10% worse than the Ignis (48 vs 53.4 MPG).

The real negative on paper is that the Arona is much more expensive than the Ignis. In reality, it's easy to get a cash discount of £2600 against list on the Arona. With a more modest cash discount on the Ignis, the gap between the two cars closes down to around £1000. The problem is that the Ignis is now an expensive car! Obviously the economics may be rather different outside the UK so you'd need to do your own analysis.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
There are complaints here and there about brake and tyre life. This isn't an unusual complaint for most cars and isn't a wholesale problem. The clutch issue is associated with the clutch / flywheel on the AGS gearbox. This was a significant problem but the AGS gearbox isn't used on the facelift Ignis. Suzuki have used a CVT gearbox on other models so as noted in other posts, it's too early to tell how this gearbox fares in the Ignis. A CVT gearbox would be expected to last100+Kmiles with minimal maintenance required. As you point out, there have been issues in the past with Jatco CVT's fitted to Suzuki and Nissan cars, the fault was pretty specific and should be well sorted by now. Would I have a CVT gearbox? Absolutely not, the constant whine is unpleasant and many cars suffer from jerking and shuddering, overheating and loss of acceleration. Manufacturers fit them because they're more fuel efficient than normal autos and smoother than some autos.

From the cars you mention as an alternative, the Seat Arona stands out. The 1 litre Arona DSG 115SE compares to the Ignis SZ-T. This is a 5 seater (Ignis is 4), 115 BHP vs 82 for the Ignis, O-60 in10 secs, 400 litre luggage space vs 250 for the Ignis. Excellent DSG gearbox vs CVT on the Ignis. Well rated by the press. Fuel consumption is about 10% worse than the Ignis (48 vs 53.4 MPG).

The real negative on paper is that the Arona is much more expensive than the Ignis. In reality, it's easy to get a cash discount of £2600 against list on the Arona. With a more modest cash discount on the Ignis, the gap between the two cars closes down to around £1000. The problem is that the Ignis is now an expensive car! Obviously the economics may be rather different outside the UK so you'd need to do your own analysis.
Wow :D...i will buy at the end of my leasing (Sept. 2021) so the plan is to monitor how it will evolve the market and proceed after the next 6 months....actually the Arona here in Germany is fine...with the optional I need I can get for 17800 Vs 16800 for Ignis...and this is because the Seat doesn't have appeal on German market....somewhere else no idea. I know it can sounds strange but the design of Ignis is very attractive for me this is why I am comparing this car with diff. Category.

Regarding CVT I know what you were speaking about, but I have understood that the current installed version has the pad and emulating the 7-shifts...am I wrong? I would definitely want to try it.
 

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I'm surprised that the Arona doesn't have appeal in Germany. After all Seat is part of the VW group and Germany is Seat's best market.

A CVT doesn't have gears, the ratios are infinity variable. However in order to emulate a normal automatic, manufacturers fit a number of electronic stops so the internal belt moves through fixed positions (false gears) as if the box was moving from one gear to another. It's just to make the driving experience more engaging. I'm not sure if the Ignis has 6 or 7 "gear" positions. Steering wheel paddles are often fitted to allow manual shifting but I suspect that the Ignis wouldn't have this feature - you'd need to check. Mode buttons are often fitted to change the shift positions to give sport or economy mode but again you'd need to check.

It's a pity that Suzuki didn't go for a TCSS / DSG gearbox as fitted to the Vitara and S-Cross. However this would have been more expensive and causes a bigger drop in fuel efficiency.

I understand your comments about buying an Ignis and you should always buy a car that appeals to you rather than basing everything on cold economics.
 

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2018 Ignis with CVT...and what is the 'whine' that is mentioned?
No noise from ours (it's 'stepless' CVT).
Maybe different CVT for us here in NZ?
Our CVT is dead quiet, and smooth.
Thrash it's little bum all over South Island (lots of hills/mountains here) and it handles it all with no problems.
 

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2018 Ignis with CVT...and what is the 'whine' that is mentioned?
No noise from ours (it's 'stepless' CVT).
Maybe different CVT for us here in NZ?
Our CVT is dead quiet, and smooth.
Thrash it's little bum all over South Island (lots of hills/mountains here) and it handles it all with no problems.
By definition a CVT is stepless - CV constantly variable rather than stepwise gear changes. Manufacturers use electronic steps but the box "ratios" are infinitely variable. All CVT's use a metal belt, chains or in the past rubber belts. The belts produce a whine which varies with engine speed. It's a huge issue with many cars but to be fair I've never even seen an Ignis CVT and in the UK it's too early since launch to see any sort of test report.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Test done 1 month ago (In Italy).
Starting from min. 13.30 he shows the paddle and 7 gearbox steps....
Is this a dedicate Jatco transmission???
 

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The CVT will almost certainly be Jacto - this Japanese company is the worlds biggest CVT supplier and have been fitted to several Suzukis. The film is actually of an alldrive so don't know if this has the same spec as the 2WD. I'm sure all will be revealed in the fullness of time. The UK brochure barely mentions the CVT.

The video below shows the Australian facelift CVT model. Looks the same as the UK version but I'm not sure if it's hybrid. Demonstrates the revvy and noisy nature of a CVT when driven hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
At min 1.29 is visible that the version in this video is the 90ps (not hybrid) without paddles: at this point I am curious to understand which version of CVT is coming in Europe...
 

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I've got the new CVT and I'm pretty happy with it. Seems pretty smooth on the gear changes. You notice it a little say you want to really put your foot down, but the reality is for city driving or maintaining a consistent speed on the motorway it's great - no issues at all. Happy to answer any specific questions though.
 

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I've got the new CVT and I'm pretty happy with it. Seems pretty smooth on the gear changes. You notice it a little say you want to really put your foot down, but the reality is for city driving or maintaining a consistent speed on the motorway it's great - no issues at all. Happy to answer any specific questions though.
The burning question for one forum member ........... does it have steering wheel paddles to manually change "gears".
 

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The burning question for one forum member ........... does it have steering wheel paddles to manually change "gears".
Yep, it does. Although the gear change is pretty smooth (coming from a car with a bad auto box) so I'll be honest in saying that it's not something that would cross my mind to use.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So se have definitely different CVTs going around..wtf!!! Where is it possible to check what they deliver to which market??

For this I would say "Chapeau" to the German: one DSG everywhere.
 

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So se have definitely different CVTs going around..wtf!!! Where is it possible to check what they deliver to which market??

For this I would say "Chapeau" to the German: one DSG everywhere.
If you check out at this video at 9.20 you can see the paddles in use...

I agree that Suzuki is inconsistent on what spec they deliver in each market... We get no heated seats in the UK and the hand book refers to auto folding mirrors for the Ignis.

One common feature for all markets is the missing 'Suzuki' at the back (I find this incredibly odd)! Although very easily fixed ;) LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Frankly speaking if this CVT is reliable, with paddle and Hybrid module this car become really interesting....but again: reliability is really good?
 

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I'm surprised that the Arona doesn't have appeal in Germany. After all Seat is part of the VW group and Germany is Seat's best market.

A CVT doesn't have gears, the ratios are infinity variable. However in order to emulate a normal automatic, manufacturers fit a number of electronic stops so the internal belt moves through fixed positions (false gears) as if the box was moving from one gear to another. It's just to make the driving experience more engaging. I'm not sure if the Ignis has 6 or 7 "gear" positions. Steering wheel paddles are often fitted to allow manual shifting but I suspect that the Ignis wouldn't have this feature - you'd need to check. Mode buttons are often fitted to change the shift positions to give sport or economy mode but again you'd need to check.

It's a pity that Suzuki didn't go for a TCSS / DSG gearbox as fitted to the Vitara and S-Cross. However this would have been more expensive and causes a bigger drop in fuel efficiency.

I understand your comments about buying an Ignis and you should always buy a car that appeals to you rather than basing everything on cold economics.
Not quite right. The CVT in the ignis and most other Japan based cars do have gears, its a pretty much standard automatic but has a variable drive between the torque converter and the main input shaft to stop the major "steps" between gears and to keep the engine revving in its most economical range.
 
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