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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2008 SX4 JX AWD.

Whenever I want to switch from "AUTO" to "LOCK", I have to hold the button down for something like 3 seconds until it eventually activates.

Is there a way to bypass that? It's incredibly annoying!

Also, the automatic fall-back to "AUTO" mode when I reach 60km/h, is also annoying. Is this necessary?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Oh, I guess your "RTFM" response was related to the need for removing lock after 60km/h, in which case the manual simply states it's a question of overheating.

Now I used to own an Impreza which has viscous coupling on the central differential. If I understand the concepts properly, whenever differential rotation is applied to the coupling, the friction causes the viscous material to heat up and solidify, effectively locking the differential.

At that point (say I did a few donuts), the central diff is locked because it's hot. Then I just leave the parking lot and get onto the highway at 100km/h for a while. Nothing exploded. Why? Is it because it unseizes quick enough to not be a problem?

Would that be why Suzuki's i-AWD requires the computer to quickly remove lock of the central diff because it would otherwise be unable to cool it down fast enough? It's a bit unclear to me all of this, which is the reason for the second part of my post.
 

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Well you must have missed the part where it says do not drive on paved roads when awd is in locked position or you will f*#k the thing up.
The reason it works that way is because the car senses when you are on hard pan and will shift back to auto as not to f*#k things up.
 

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yeah the LOCK feature if you read the manual is for desperate times on mud or snow only if you get stuck. its not meant to be on while your on blacktop or any non-loose surface. it can overheat your awd system, and eventually break it.
 

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I have a 2008 SX4 JX AWD.

Whenever I want to switch from "AUTO" to "LOCK", I have to hold the button down for something like 3 seconds until it eventually activates.

Is there a way to bypass that? It's incredibly annoying!

Also, the automatic fall-back to "AUTO" mode when I reach 60km/h, is also annoying. Is this necessary?

So holding a button down for 3 seconds is incredibly annoying to you?
Is your finger made of silly putty?

As for driving all day long in LOCK, go for it. Just keep under 60km/h. The people that wrote the manual know nothing, they are just screwing with ya.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
So holding a button down for 3 seconds is incredibly annoying to you?
Is your finger made of silly putty?
Yes, and it's a real problem! Please do not laugh at people with platicinitis! You should see the mess it makes when I use the parking brake.

I admit my adjective might have been a bit blunt. Perhaps we could settle for "mildly annoying", or maybe "represents and inconvenience"? I'm very flexible, we can surely find a middle ground.

But seriously, it's not the action of pressing it that I find annoying, it's the delay involved. When I want to switch into lock, I want it now, not tomorrow. Maybe it's fine your average driver that will press it once to get out of the snow bank and be done with it, but I would prefer a quicker response.

Much the same way as I chose to drive a manual transmission for the responsiveness, not relying on the awful automatic transmission selection of gears and delayed response when resquesting abrupt changes in driving style.

As for driving all day long in LOCK, go for it. Just keep under 60km/h. The people that wrote the manual know nothing, they are just screwing with ya.
Now now, please re-read my posts very carefully and observer that I have, at no point whatsoever, implied that instruction manual writers did now know what they were talking about. What I implied was that the instruction manual lacked details about the reasoning behind the given instruction. You're right, the manual is very very specific at telling what I should not do, but gives no indication as to why.

This lack of information leads me to bring the subject into a discussion forum where other people can share their knowledge. Of course there's no good reason why they should detail in an instruction manual the mechanical reasons why the lock shouldn't be left on, but that doesn't mean I'm not interested into finding it.
 

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the suby is an all time AWD, as apposed to our cars that are only in "rough" times. the zuk AWD system is more similar to 4wd systems that are not meant to driven on hard surface, unlike true AWD systems that are running all wheels all the time.

sorry i wasnt able to shed light on your question
 

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Yes, and it's a real problem! Please do not laugh at people with platicinitis! You should see the mess it makes when I use the parking brake.
I am sorry if I offended you, platicinitis is not a laughing matter. My aunt had it and melted while ringing a doorbell. Not a pretty sight.

But seriously, it's not the action of pressing it that I find annoying, it's the delay involved. When I want to switch into lock, I want it now, not tomorrow. Maybe it's fine your average driver that will press it once to get out of the snow bank and be done with it, but I would prefer a quicker response.
I know I'm going to regret asking this, but why is it so urgent for you to get into lock mode? Is there a herd of cheetahs after you and you are in a snow bank? Have to get to the ATM and you are in mud? The ex-wife is coming at you with a hatchet and you are in sand? (OK, I can understand that one).

Just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Haha okay first of all, most of what I do with my car is filed under "because I can". So no, there is no real actual tangible reason that would imperatively require the lock to be available quicker. I would just want it to work like that, as a personal preference. Much like many Americans would like their japanese imported car to stop turning on the daytime headlights, even though there's no good reason for it other than "because they can."

Most of the time I wish I had a faster locking button is when I change pavement type and enter a gravel road or something. I want the lock to be there immediately because I may be tempted to push cornering a bit too far for fun, and automatic mode just doesn't respond the same.

On another note, something happened to me yesterday that warrants investigation. I was at a road junction, it was raining, and I was about to make a left turn on a busy street that has no stop sign. After waiting some time I finally saw an opportunity to squeeze myself into the traffic, but it was short a bit, so I decided to floor it as the AWD would help me out and get there faster on the wet pavement.

Much to my surprise, a wheel (presumably front left) started to spin very fast while the car was moving forward, but much slower than normal for that road condition. I concluded that I was loosing much of my traction through the spinning of the wheel. What troubled me is that there didn't seem to be anything going on on the rear. I crossed the entire street like that, so about one second in time maybe. What is puzzling me now is did a) a 2nd wheel from the rear spin as well, thereby losing full traction, or b) the central diff (being in AUTO mode) didn't transfer enough to the rear or didn't react quick enough?

I didn't have the chance to repeat the experience in lock mode, but this is something that I don't recall experiencing in the 2 years i've had my Impreza (with the viscous coupling diff).
 

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Ok, here's the deal:
the delay for the AWD lock cannot be overridden without re-writing the programming that controls the transfer engagement unit.
Also:
The Suzuki SX4 AWD system behaves more like the Subaru AWD system that is in the automatic transsmission cars, in that, when you're just travelling down the road and the wheels are all travelling the same speed, the transfer clutch is disengaged. You are actually travelling allong in FWD in both Subaru and Suzuki. When the wheelspeed changes enough between front and rear wheels (and other criteria are met), the transfer unit engages, sending power to the rear wheels.
When you put your SX4 in "lock" mode, you're locking the front and rear wheels together directly, with no slipping or differential action. There is no center differential in you SX4... "lock" is LOCKED, which is why they (Suzuki) don't like it really being engaged when you're just driving around, you'll damage the drivetrain and/or tires.
~Erik~
 

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Probably the main and most important reason is that you don't accidently push the button and lock in AWD when you dont mean to. That could be a possible disaster in certain circumstances. Just plan ahead by 4 seconds.
 

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The Suzuki SX4 AWD system behaves more like the Subaru AWD system that is in the automatic transsmission cars, in that, when you're just travelling down the road and the wheels are all travelling the same speed, the transfer clutch is disengaged. You are actually travelling allong in FWD in both Subaru and Suzuki.
~Erik~

now that i wasnt aware of, thanks erik - always nice to learn:)
 

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yeah, just FWD. really it's not like that's a bad thing, since both systems very quickly engage the transfer unit when slippage is detected. The only Subaru AWD type to be truly AWD all the time is the one in their manual transmission; it's a center diufferential with a viscous coupling....effectively a viscous limited-slip center differential.
~Erik~
 

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slight correction to my previous post: Subaru transmissions until the VDC cars then in about 2004-ish were the "FWD most of the time" type, but are now a torque-split during normal driving, so they're actually a true "all the time" AWD. so what I said was true up until recently........just had to add that
 

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slight correction to my previous post: Subaru transmissions until the VDC cars then in about 2004-ish were the "FWD most of the time" type, but are now a torque-split during normal driving, so they're actually a true "all the time" AWD. so what I said was true up until recently........just had to add that

Actually, The only Subaru that was ever a FWD was the pre 1996 models that had the ON/OFF switch

anything newer than that, is FULL TIME AWD, with power being sent to front and rear at all times, Auto tranny can send up to 55% front and 45%
rear, and up to 50/50 left and right
The Manual Tranny will split up to 50/50 front and rear, left and right.


According to Suzuki Canada, the i-AWD is also a full time system, operating in 80% FWD 20% RWD in the auto mode until the rear needs more traction then power is sent to the rear up 65% front 45% rear

At this point if you need more traction, you lock the center diff 50/50.
The reason for the delay is a safety item. There are moving parts in there spinning, and the delay allows everythign to match speed before engaging. The auto default back to Auto mode is for a few reasons, 1) damage to the transmission (through overheating and binding) 2) If you are driving more than 60 kms/hr in lock, road conditions are not severe enough the lock.
This AWD is designed as a convenience, if you want drifting and general abuse for your AWD buy a Subaru. If you want reliability to get you where you want to go and not worry about traction on the way, get the SX4

I work for a dual franchise Suzuki/Subaru dealer, and have many yers of factory training, I would more than happy to answer any other questions.

Thanks

Dylan
 
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