Suzuki Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I've been having problems with the LSPV on my 2003 Grand Vitara, it sprung a leak, and a new one is almost impossible to find, even the dealer can't get one. I bought a new one on eBay, that the seller said was the correct one for my 2003 Suzuki Grand Vitara, w/o anti-lock brakes,( I don't think it is} but when I got it and put it on it caused the rear brakes to lock up under normal braking, so much that there was smoke coming from both rear wheels . There is no adjustment on the valve, I tried disconnecting the spring, it still locked up the back brakes, I even tried tying the arm on the LSPV up, and then tying it down, still locked the brakes. ( Before my old LSPV started leaking, I never had any braking trouble, which is why I think the valve I bought on eBay probably is the wrong one)) I have read about people bypassing the LSPV, some use a manual proportioning valve such as this https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/wil-260-8419/recommendedparts and that looks like what I'm going to have to do. I have three brake lines running into my LSPV, one is from the front, one to the rear, and I think the third one is a return line. Has anyone here ever did this, I never have, and would appreciate any advice or suggestions
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,161 Posts
Hi, I've been having problems with the LSPV on my 2003 Grand Vitara, it sprung a leak, and a new one is almost impossible to find, even the dealer can't get one. I bought a new one on eBay, that the seller said was the correct one for my 2003 Suzuki Grand Vitara, w/o anti-lock brakes,( I don't think it is} but when I got it and put it on it caused the rear brakes to lock up under normal braking, so much that there was smoke coming from both rear wheels . There is no adjustment on the valve, I tried disconnecting the spring, it still locked up the back brakes, I even tried tying the arm on the LSPV up, and then tying it down, still locked the brakes. ( Before my old LSPV started leaking, I never had any braking trouble, which is why I think the valve I bought on eBay probably is the wrong one)) I have read about people bypassing the LSPV, some use a manual proportioning valve such as this https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/wil-260-8419/recommendedparts and that looks like what I'm going to have to do. I have three brake lines running into my LSPV, one is from the front, one to the rear, and I think the third one is a return line. Has anyone here ever did this, I never have, and would appreciate any advice or suggestions
You sure you installed it correctly and didn't get the pipes on the wrong connections? I suspect you had the wrong valve.

Get it done by a brake specialist, if you have ABS, or non ABS there will be 2 lines coming from the front, and on to the rear wheels, you must get the correct pairs to keep correct braking balance as these are "dual circuit" brakes meaning a broken line only takes out a pair of brakes. Usually diagonal setup so LF and RR are on same circuit and RF and LR are on the other to keep car straight if one "side" fails.

That valve you linked to is a single valve, you will need two, one in each "side"

Go see a pro, its easier and they can set them correctly, or fit a different type of proportioning valve (or remove it entirely as its usually easier and most people won't even know or notice its missing) and get the brakes set correctly so the first time you slam them on in anger you don't go spearing off into oncoming traffic.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,097 Posts
Have you tried the japanese sources for the LSPV - amayama.com or megazip.net? I picked a random Grand Vitara and the LSPV shows as available.

Also, whilst these are "dual circuit" brakes, it's front on one circuit & rear on the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,161 Posts
Also, whilst these are "dual circuit" brakes, it's front on one circuit & rear on the other.
ok, removed post as it appears I posted incorrect info, apologies to all.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,097 Posts
You might want to make sure the manual you're looking at matches the vehicle being discussed - you're in the second gen forum, on a second gen vehicle, there is a single brake flex line from either the LSPV or the ABS modulator to the live rear axle which then feeds I think it's the right rear wheel cylinder before running across to the left rear - there is only one bleed nipple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,161 Posts
interesting, that pics from the suzuki 2G manual I have. I know the system you mean, split front / rear and single line to rear wheels. LPSV "bleeds" pressure into front circuit when unloaded.
I'm going to check the manual again. Wouldn't be the first time Suzuki have had wrong info in a service book, altho not as bad as the other common ones that are way worse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,161 Posts
ok, I checked, my "online" version shows the front /rear picture, my "downloaded" version in the shop that I sourced my picture from has the incorrect picture in it, and shows a diagonal split brake circuit diagram. I have now downloaded a new copy.

Dammit, I hate it when this happens, thanks for pointing it out.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,097 Posts
I don't think the LSPV allows flow from one circuit into the other - as far as I know the reason the front circuit is fed to the LSPV is to provide a reference point - for a given "load" the more pressure in the front circuit, the higher the 'cut off' limit in the rear circuit - the exception is when there is no/low pressure in the front circuit due to a failure, at that point the full pressure should be sent to the rear brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,161 Posts
I don't think the LSPV allows flow from one circuit into the other - as far as I know the reason the front circuit is fed to the LSPV is to provide a reference point - for a given "load" the more pressure in the front circuit, the higher the 'cut off' limit in the rear circuit - the exception is when there is no/low pressure in the front circuit due to a failure, at that point the full pressure should be sent to the rear brakes.
yep, thats how I read it, I may have said not stated it correctly, front pressure alters porting valve which in turn alters rear brake pressure. My apologies.
As you say, if the rear circuit in the master cylinder fails, the LPSV porting changes to allow the front brake fluid to activate the rear wheels according to the manual i have (which I am now wondering how accurate it actually is)
What it doesn't say is what happens if a wheel cylinder or the transverse pipe fails, what happens then? apart from soiled underpants and very white knuckles?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,097 Posts
What is the imagined scenario here?

A failed rear brake wheel cylinder or transverse pipe would not affect the front brake circuit - the vehicle would/should be quite controllable, albeit with noticeably impaired braking - it should actually be less scary than a failure of the front brake circuit.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top