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Inherited a 93 kick 4 dr. 16v auto... Car sat a long time 10-12 months. Was used as winter driver mostly. Ran fine back then. Problem: idle good but step on gas it will sputter stumble and feels like not getting fuel. Feels like its running on 2 cylinders. If you step on gas ever so lightly like an egg was between foot and pedal it will rev up to red line if desired. When stumbling it will not rev up and will drop in rpm's. Almost acts like no fuel. Prev. owner threw parts at it, tuned plugs, cap rotor wires fuel filter etc. MAF, fuel pressure regulator. I then came into the picture and checked & got code 22. Changed throttle positon sensor. then got code 44, changed IAC. No new codes. Also drained fuel & replaced w/fresh. Some times almost feels normal sometimes not. At idle its very smooth running. At steady throttle ie: @ 2 or 3000 rpm's runs smooth.
I'm kind of at a loss as to what it is. Any help would be appreciated. Sorry for being long winded but wanted to provide as much info as I could..
 

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As the car is new to you, it would be sensible to do a compression test to check the timing of the engine. Often these cars are timed incorrectly. You should also check and make sure that your spark plugs are gapped to .028" and not just used out of the box. The compression test will verify what is happening with the individual cylinders - it is simple to do on your car - just pull the F1 fuse, remove all plugs, make sure the battery is well charged, and floor the gas pedal when you are cranking. The 16v should pull about 190psi on all cylinders. If you find that they are all lower, chances are the car isn't timed properly - if one is low, try pouring a teaspoon of oil in that cylinder and try the test again on that cylinder. There is also a valve lash adjustment that is normally done as part of a 60K service, which may never have been done at all. But first do the compression test and post your results.
The number one cause of bogging in these cars is a dirty EGR circuit - with the car running, if you carefully push the diaphragm of the EGR forward, your car should try to stall. The valve as well as the passages that you see when you remove the valve, can be cleaned with carb cleaner.
You should also advise exactly what your car does from cold start - what cold idle is, how it warms up, what warm idle is, etc.
As you are already familiar with the ECU and codes, I would assume that the check engine light is on with the key on and off once the car starts....
Oh, and welcome to the forum! :)
 

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oldcardoc,

"Almost acts like no fuel" and "Also drained fuel & replaced w/fresh." I did see the fuel filter on your list of PO changed items, but what color was the old fuel when drained? Depending on your location, (a good item to put in your sig) fuel tanks have been known to rust so bad as to clog new filters, almost right away.

Bex's recommended compression check is a very good idea when trying to get a base-line on a "new to you" rig, ESPECIALLY when it has a problem. One of the things it checks is that the valve train is timed correctly to the crank. An air pump (Internal combustion motor) will not be as efficient with poor valve timing and will not generate the pressures expected from a well timed valve train. The "190psi on all cylinders" is for a warm engine and is the best way to get consistent results.

Notes about compression checks for others reading this thread:
-- If the motor does not run, it is hard to do a warm compression check. Do it cold, but expect readings about 20 psi lower.
-- 8 valve motors, being a less efficient air pump. will have readings about 20 psi lower than the 16 valve motor. (170 psi warm.)
-- Putting a "teaspoon of oil" in a low cylinder, is to improve the ring seal to the cylinder wall. An improvement with this "wet compression test" indicates bad/worn rings or some other issue with the cylinder wall. Do not use too much oil. If you put more oil in than the minimum volume of the combustion chamber (normally several teaspoons), it can cause "hydro-lock" and cause some serious damage. Also I have been told that doing a wet compression check on a diesel engine* has caused the motor to fire. But I currently "don't do" diesels, so I wouldn't know from experience.

Take the word "forward" in the EGR valve procedure Bex mentions with a grain of salt. The EGR valve is mounted with different orientations 16v to 8v motors. Just "carefully" push the diaphragm of the EGR (it will be hot) to activate the egr system, at idle. The exhaust gases should get routed back to the intake causing the motor to stumble. If it does not, you have something in the passage ways clogged up. (Early 16v motors, like your '93, are known for this.) If it DOES stumble, and you still are not getting an EGR function, it is in the control side of things.

As Big Ed says, a "busted exhaust manifold" can cause symptoms like yours. Depending on the crack/break it could cause other issues, as it heats and cools... widening the crack or closing it. A crack allows air to get in and exhaust to escape, messing up the readings at the O2 sensor... used to manage fuel mixture. The normal place they crack is at the "Y" were the #4 exhaust runner meets the manifold. I have never seen a good 16v manifold in a junk-yard and rarely are the cars there missing the manifold.

Anyway, good luck with your "new" rig. Get a good base-line and take everything the PO said was done with a grain of salt. "Trust but verify."

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*A diesel engine is an oil burning, compression fired, engine. Some TracKicks did have them installed from the factory, but sold in non-US markets... sadly.
 
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