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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently modified my GV-2007 by installing negative offset rims , maxxis MT tyres and 45mm lift kit. this further required to widen the wheel arches so some cutting was necessary. the other reason was to have enough room for snow chains if needed.

im happy with the end result however it has gone a bit sluggish, I'm looking at rack and pinion gear replacement to increase torque and bring it inline with standard gearing. any ideas who i need to turn to by gearing needs?
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Rack & pinion or ring & pinion? Rack & pinion is the type of steering, ring & pinion is the reduction gears in the front & rear axles.

You haven't told us what size tires you have fitted, and that I suspect is where your "sluggishness" is coming from, I'm not aware of anyone doing gears for the third gens.
 

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I would agree with fordem, good luck finding different ratio sets for a 3rd gen

How big are those tyres?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Rack & pinion or ring & pinion? Rack & pinion is the type of steering, ring & pinion is the reduction gears in the front & rear axles.

You haven't told us what size tires you have fitted, and that I suspect is where your "sluggishness" is coming from, I'm not aware of anyone doing gears for the third gens.
245/75R16 tyres, thank you for the correction. 4x4Art used to make them but have stopped. I was informed some Italian companies still make it but unable to find any names at the moment.
 

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245/75R16 tyres, thank you for the correction. 4x4Art used to make them but have stopped. I was informed some Italian companies still make it but unable to find any names at the moment.
I know they used to make them for the 2G models, but I haven't seen any diff ratio kits for the 3G models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Looking at the increase due to tire size, new tire is 6.8% larger in dia. as opposed to the standard one and 8.2% wider, revolution per km has changed by 7.3%. Was wondering if this difference needs gear ratio correction?
 

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Wider will increase the road friction so rob a little power. Larger diameter will rob a little engine power also and be the bigger contributor towards this. I have no idea how that will affect the apparent feel of the vehicle or sluggishness. It will be most noticeable if you have a 1.6ltr engine and probably hardly noticeable if a 3.2ltr. Others can comment better on this. I have a 3.2ltr and although my tires and slightly larger I didn't notice much change. It will also affect the speedo but in my case the increase was less than yours and I consider that it probably zeroes out the tendency to under-read that is inherent in most vehicles. In your case you need to be aware of this if you happen to have over zealous cops around.
 

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In my experience, anything over around 6% (regardless of engine size) is enough to be felt - how much you feel it is going to vary with transmission type, the nature of the terrain you drive (flat vs hilly), and also how perceptive the driver is, also third gens aren't noted for being quick off the line, even on OE sized tires.

Braking is also going to be adversely affected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mine is 2.0L gasoline Manual transmission, 138HP. Aim was to create an adventure vehicle, bigger tires provides it will adequate flotation on loose ground. no complaints on that front. it would be interesting to see if someone come out with portal axle kind of arrangement for IFS. This would resolve camber adjustments, will offer lower gearing ratios and the lift restrictions on most of the IFS arrangements.
 

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My new tires added 6mm in height gain. My raise kit (springs and shocks) came with adjustable camber bolts (which I believe you can buy separately). It is a 5 speed auto and is quite quick off the line (but this is relative I guess compared to other vehicles).
If I had to do it all over again I would wait until I could get a rare 3.2ltr (229hp).
 

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Mine is 2.0L gasoline Manual transmission, 138HP. Aim was to create an adventure vehicle, bigger tires provides it will adequate flotation on loose ground. no complaints on that front. it would be interesting to see if someone come out with portal axle kind of arrangement for IFS. This would resolve camber adjustments, will offer lower gearing ratios and the lift restrictions on most of the IFS arrangements.
The 2.0 will certainly notice the bigger tyres, when compared to the 2.4 4 cylinder the 2.0 is definitely down on power.

Get adjustable camber bolts for the front.

I'm running 235/60/18 on mine and go all the places the others can go, its just the ground clearance that's the issue.
 

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My new tires added 6mm in height gain.
A 6mm difference is neither here nor there - it's roughly the difference between a tire that needs replacement and the new tire that's going to replace it - the tread blocks on the General Grabber A/TX tires I put on my Jimny (215/75R15, so not particularly large) have 10mm depth.
 

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I think i gained about 12 mm in base diameter with my tyre change, about 25 mm by the time you take tread into account.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The 2.0 will certainly notice the bigger tyres, when compared to the 2.4 4 cylinder the 2.0 is definitely down on power.

Get adjustable camber bolts for the front.

I'm running 235/60/18 on mine and go all the places the others can go, its just the ground clearance that's the issue.
ground clearance issue has been completely resolved on mine as it has gained almost 100mm to the stock. coupled with shorter wheelbase compared to bigger SUVs helps it even more. on mud tracks and slower runs it is perfecly fine, open highway it struggles with power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'll be installing manual sway bar disconnect by HTM motoring in next few weeks or so and lets hope it does what HTM is portraying. Anyone tested this before? link below.

 

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I'll be installing manual sway bar disconnect by HTM motoring in next few weeks or so and lets hope it does what HTM is portraying. Anyone tested this before? link below.

Wont do too much on an independent suspension setup, more designed for solid beam axles to increase articulated movement. Nissan fitted these on their big "safari" models, called stabi-lok and it works well.

It will help a bit, but worth it? Not sure in your case.
 

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First - don't be put off by 2013GV's negative approach (or mine for that matter) - anti-sway (or anti-roll) bars limit articulation on both solid axle and independent suspension designs, and people have been removing & discarding the anti-roll bars from their first & second generation Vitaras & Grand Vitaras for decades.

I need you to recognize a couple of things ...

First - fitting that requires a section of the bar to be cut out and that "disconnect" welded in - the heat will affect the "temper" of the bar.

An anti-roll bar is not just a piece of steel, it is, so to speak, an "assist spring", you can reduce roll by fitting stiffer springs, but that makes for a harsher ride, the anti-roll bar allows for both wheels on the same end of the vehicle to move up & down together freely (so no increase in overall spring rate), but if the wheel on one side moves up/down without the other moving (due to body roll in a turn), the bar resists the movement, effectively increasing the spring rate there.

Let's read that paragraph again - if the wheel on one side moves up/down without the other moving (due to body roll in a turn), the bar resists the movement, effectively increasing the spring rate there - the exact same thing happens if the "terrain" under the vehicle is not level or even - one wheel goes up because of an uneven surface, the bar will attempt to move the other one up - if one wheel needs to go down because of a rut on one side, the bar will attempt to prevent it, limiting the articulation.

You most likely already know this, so why am I stressing it? To make sure you understand that the anti-roll (anti-sway) bar is a spring, and that heating it affects the temper of the steel.

Second - unless that vehicle is level when it is time to remove/insert that "pin" - you're likely to have difficulty - for removal the pin will bind and be difficult to pull out, for insertion, the holes may not line up.

Last but not least - I expect that "disconnect" to shear the pin in a very short time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Two things I have been noticing for a while now, one is the starting, during cranking, at times it starts with one crank and at times it starts but the rpm is so low it seems it will die again and with throttle input it comes to life, at times I have to crank 4-5 times before it starts. is it something to do with ignition coil?

The other issue is that throttle response, lets suppose car is on an uphill gradient, by applying brake and throttle combination allows for starting from stand still without rolling back, yes I'm aware handbrake can be utilized but I'm pointing out towards the delay in engine reviving to accommodate the slope. Any indication as to what would be the reason of a delayed throttle response.

appreciate your thoughts,
 

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Try cleaning the throttle body - once that's been done, when you reconnect it, switch the ignition on but do not start the engine, wait about 30 seconds for the drive-by-wire system to recalibrate itself, and then start the engine.
 
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