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Hi First of all apologies, I cannot seem to find the new members section to do my intro.
My name is Bob and I am in Wigan. I have a 1995 Suzuki Samurai with single point fuel injection.
Over the last 3 years I have re bodied it to look like a 1930's style sports car
( JC Midge Roadster picture attached hopefully )
Since starting the engine at the beginning of the year I have burnout 5 fuel pumps my Brother ( electrician ) and I have checked the wiring even run a new feed and earth from the battery using via a relay using the original feed as a signal wire.
We have checked the fuel return it does seem to be returning at full pressure.
We have come to the conclusion that it must be something to do with the fuel pressure regulator and the many vacuum pipes and electrical sensors.
Can anyone help ?
Regards
Bob
 

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What is the,
  • fuel pump pressure at the pump,
  • fuel pressure at the FPR,
  • draw on the pump(Amps)..
  • running Amp spec on the pump?
Have you checked the flow at the FPR when adding/removing vacuum?

... Philip
 

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I'm temped to question the quality of the pumps that you are using.

Let me start by asking a few questions though - what style of pump are you using, what is it rated for (flow rate & pressure) and what burns on it.

The original pump would have been a "swimmer" pump, one that is submerged in the tank and is to some extent, dependent on fuel for cooling. If you are using a similar style of pump and it is rated for the required pressure, flow and method of regulation (in this case, bypass), I see no reason why they should burn.

The original pump is designed to run whenever the engine is running, if the ECU sees the engine stop, it will shut the pump off, there is no other interaction between the ECU and the pump, so unless you have a situation where you're running out of fuel and the ECU doesn't shut the pump off, I don't see any of the sensors as being involved.

The fuel pressure regulator is a fairly common "bypass" style, it regulates pressure in the fuel rail by allowing fuel in excess of the engine's requirements to bypass the engine and return to the tank - it's unlikely that it is related to the problem - but that is assuming that the pump is appropriately sized for the task.
 
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