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Discussion Starter #1
Surprised to find rot in the floor area near the front attachment to frame area. I am in the process of making some repair panels to install.

Before I go to far, I am asking if anything like this is available for my 2013 Suzuki XL-7.

I know shipping large floor sections is out of the question, but is there anything at all that is available.

I live in Canada, and our winters are long and the roads are salty. But I doubt that I am the first person to face this problem, so I am hoping for some advice.
 

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99 Tracker, 5 door, 2L, 4x4
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I live in Canada, , so I am hoping for some advice.
20g sheet metal,
a chunk of sandstone marker
a tape meaure
a set of shears,
a panel beater
a mig welder... and
a dog sled for transport while the truck is down...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I made the repair panels out of sheet steel 'body metal" that I bought from UAP.

All of the panels were small (less than 24 inch), and it took 2 panels for the inside the cabin, and 2 panels on the underside. This was done on both sides. In each case, there was a verticle panel and a horizontal panel, and it mattered which was put in first, but it was easy to get it correct. I did not have a metal "brake" bender, so I clamped the panels in a shop-mate and bent them the old fashioned way to get the lips that you need to attach them to each other.

I had some sheet metal screws but did not have a welder. I used construction adhesive that comes in a caulking gun format sold at Home Depot.

I made the panels, fitted them for best installation, took them out, then drilled enough holes to attach them to the vehicle, and then to each other. Then I painted the panels with tremclad paint.

I applied plenty of adhesive to the back side of the panels and attached them to the vehicle with the screws. It takes about a day for the adhesive to become rock hard. I went back over every seam with the adhesive and sealed every seam to become water-tight with a small brush that is used to apply flux in a solder job.

The job was labour intensive and took nearly a week from start to finish. But I must say it could not have turned out better. The panel adhesive is the best method for this job, so don't let not having a welder keep you from fixing panels on your vehicle.
 

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Glad I'm not riding in that one.....home depot construction adhesive? You are joking? Right? Specialist metal adhesive for vehicles is not available over the counter to the public and requires specific primers to get strength. Theres a reason panel shops use welders.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I forgot to mention that step one was buying 2 sheets of construction board. After making the sketches of the panels, you transfer the measurements and make a flat panel depiction on the board. Then you cut it out and make the appropriate bends and cuts to see how close you can get to a tight fitting replacement part.

After making the appropriate adjustments, you transfer this flat panel shape onto the steel sheet and cut it out with a jig-saw.

This is where a lot of the time is spent, but each panel gets a little bit easier.
 
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