Suzuki Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a 1994 spanish built 1.6 vitara. When in 2 wheel drive it rolls around nice and smooth but when I stick it into 4x4 hi or low with full lock on it makes a knocking noise and locks up. Its not so bad when driving straight but the min I turn its locking up again. Could this be a faulty cv joint or is it a diff problem? One of my cv joints has a small cut in the boot. What I mean by the front end locking up, its like the front wheels are not free to rotate and the back wheels are pushing them around. Any advice would be great.
Thanks
Steve
 

·
Registered
99 Tracker, 5 door, 2L, 4x4
Joined
·
11,264 Posts
YES!

That is known as drive train "wind-up".... Completely normal.!...

The fix:.... DO NOT DRIVE on dry surface.....

Repercussion if you continue, big damage, lots of $$$$$$..

...... Philip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Aquanaut20, Its my first 4x4. Is drive train wind up normal or is it due to worn parts? I only used it on dry tarmac for a few feet and was getting the windup. should I replace the diff?
 

·
Registered
99 Tracker, 5 door, 2L, 4x4
Joined
·
11,264 Posts
Thanks Aquanaut20, Its my first 4x4. Is drive train wind up normal or is it due to worn parts? I only used it on dry tarmac for a few feet and was getting the windup. should I replace the diff?
No worn parts... Check your tires for same tread and diameter.. should not run odd tires...

..... Philip
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
25,554 Posts
These cars are part time 4wd,. and should only be put into 4wd (transfer case in 4wd and hubs locked) when you are on a slippery surface where one of the wheels can slip. Think of the logic: when you are making a turn, the wheel on the outside of your turn is traveling farther than the one on the inside. Yet, in 4wd, these wheels are locked together, so something's gotta give. This is why you got the noise when you were turning, as your tires were rotating at different speeds, rather than going straight, where they are traveling at the same rotation.
And as Aqua says, you also need to make sure, if you are driving in 4wd, that your tires are the same size (again, as larger tires will rotate slower than smaller ones...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
You could have a chipped spider gear in the diff and a piece of it gets caught in the unit as it rotates, seen a few at the local salvage yard ,or a pinion bearing is gone, it really depends on the way it was driven before you owned it, driving around in 4 wheel all the time (hubs locked in , transfer case in 2wd) is a favourite winter trick here and most forget about it and then drive on pavement without unlocking the hubs, you can easily get away with it on gravel but not on hard surfaces.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
25,554 Posts
driving around in 4 wheel all the time (hubs locked in , transfer case in 2wd) is a favourite winter trick here and most forget about it and then drive on pavement without unlocking the hubs, you can easily get away with it on gravel but not on hard surfaces.
You are not in 4wd unless the transfer case is in 4wd as well. Driving around with the hubs locked, but the transfer case in 2wd should cause no problems - more wear, perhaps on the front drivetrain, than you would have normally, but there is no power going to the front wheels unless the transfer case is in 4wd.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,319 Posts
You could have a chipped spider gear in the diff and a piece of it gets caught in the unit as it rotates, seen a few at the local salvage yard ,or a pinion bearing is gone, it really depends on the way it was driven before you owned it, driving around in 4 wheel all the time (hubs locked in , transfer case in 2wd) is a favourite winter trick here and most forget about it and then drive on pavement without unlocking the hubs, you can easily get away with it on gravel but not on hard surfaces.
There are hundreds if not thousands of 4WDs being driven with the hubs locked in and the transfer case in 2WD, in fact, there are hundreds if not thousands of 4WDs that don't have freewheel hubs that can be unlocked.

As long as the transfer case is in 2WD, the vehicle can be operated on any surface - the penalty is increased fuel consumption, along with increased wear on the front drive train, which I'd like to point out is no more than the wear occurring on the rear drive train.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top