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Whats the best way about putting another water temp gauge in? Either tapping into the water output hose or renewing the water sensor and have both the dash and extra come off it? :) Thanks
 

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Just so that you're aware - if you're using an electrical gauge, the gauge and the sender are a "matched" pair - don't expect to use an after market gauge with the factory sender or vice versa, and don't try two gauges to one sender.

Also - for best results - the sender needs to be mounted - on a Samurai - in the intake manifold, as close as possible, to the original sender location - you want it to be "upstream" of the thermostat.

If you put it in the top radiator hose, which is "downstream" from the thermostat, it will not indicate the coolant temperature in the engine, and will show cold until the thermostat opens and coolant starts to circulate - what you will see is the engine showing cold for quite awhile, and then very suddenly come to normal temperature - if the thermostat fails shut, the engine will overheat before the gauge moves from cold.
 

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You know - I almost included a paragraph on the bottom hose in the first reply - if you put a temperature sensor on the bottom radiator hose, what you will get is the temperature on the water returning from the radiator after it has cooled - you will never know how hot the engine is running.

You will also suffer from all of the previously mentioned ills of having the sensor in the top radiator hose - no indication of temperature before the thermostat opens, and if the thermostat fails shut ....

As I said earlier - the best place is in the intake manifold - on the G13 engine used in the Samurai, the water flows through the block, through the head, into the intake manifold and then through the thermostat if it is open out to the radiator - for ideal results, you want the sensor in the water jacket, in the intake manifold, and as close to the original sender location.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What i mean is, are there any spare holes where i can put it in. I want to keep the stock one and leave it well alone. If you take the original one out then the ECU would play havock.
 

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Maybe you should go take a look at the intake manifold - see how many sensor ports there are, and how many sensors are fitted, if you're lucky there will be an unused port or a sensor with nothing connected - if not consider drilling and tapping a hole somewhere appropriate.

By the way - I'm pretty certain that the ECU has it's own sensor and is not connected to the temperature gauge sender.
 

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I think the ECU does use the gauge sender for water temp on the samurai. There's also a temp sender for the block which I believe is oil temp. If you want to look for an easy tap into the water jacket you can use the hoses going to the thermal plunger on the back side of the carburetor. there's a supply and a return line. It's what your carburetor uses to determine the temperaure, and it's always cycling coolant from the water jacket so it's a good gauge of the engine coolant temp.
 

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Here's the wiring diagram for a '90~92 Samurai (courtesy of Ack's FAQ) the water temp gauge sender (yellow/white wire) goes to two places, the gauge and the a/c coupler - you'll find this sender just above and to the left of the ECU on the diagram.

There is a separate water temp sensor for the ECU (grey/yellow & red/yellow wires - the grey/yellow wire is common to all the ECU sensors, the red/yellow wire connects only to the ECU) - you'll find this sensor below the ECU on the diagram, grouped with all the other ECU sensors.

All of the early Suzuki EFI systems function this way - the ECU sensors are separate and have their own wiring. I haven't really looked at the newer (post 2000) systems, but, up to the '98~05 Grand Vitaras, the gauge sender and the ECU sensor are electrically separate units.
 

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On my '91 EFI, there is a BVSV valve located on the intake manifold. This valve controls the vacuum line going to evaporative canister. The valve opens when the water temperature rises above 150 degrees.

If you remove the BVSV, you can screw in a temperature sensor there with an adapter. I have a 1 5/8 SunPro mechanical gauge sensor that came with an adapter that fit perfectly. Of course that leaves you with the problem of how to purge the canister when the engine is running.
 

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fordem said:
All of the early Suzuki EFI systems function this way - the ECU sensors are separate and have their own wiring. I haven't really looked at the newer (post 2000) systems, but, up to the '98~05 Grand Vitaras, the gauge sender and the ECU sensor are electrically separate units.

ahh... I was going on the impression this was a carburetted model. we don't have that second temp sensor for the fuel injector.... too many members, too many rigs to keep track of who's driving what... Chris, please specify year and country of origin when posting questions and it will help get a correct answer.


Thanks for posting that fordem. On my wiring diagram I don't have the stuff for the AC listed and I've been wracking my brain to find what the other loose yellow white wire connects to. I found it to be on the same circut as the Yellow white wire from the temp sender, but didn't know if it was supposed to be hooked up to something. aparently not since I don't have A.C.
 

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I'd have to find my a/c diagram to be 100% certain - but - I believe the a/c equipped cars have a third (separate) temp sensor also, and that may hold true for carburetted cars (in which case it's a second sensor, because those lack the ECU sensor).

The a/c side of things really needs to be verified on a car by car basis - my GV ('98) has two electrically separate sensors in one housing - one for the gauge and the other for the ECU - and the ECU also controls the a/c, so if the ECU sees the temp go too high, it will command the condenser clutch off and the condeser fan on.
 
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