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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, I am fairly new to DIY stuff, but am determined. Can someone advise how I replace the spark plugs in my GV. Like specifically do I need a ratchet extension? If so what length? Also, what size socket do I need to remove the spark plug and how tight should I put the new ones in?

Any insight is greatly apprecaited
 

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Serious question here Andy - is this your first plug change? Go outside, open the hood (or bonnet if you prefer), remove the engine cover and take a look at what you have there - can you even see the plugs? Sometimes you're going to have to figure things out for yourself - youtube and the internet are not going to be there every time you need them, and they are both frequently incorrect & misleading - remember - you don't know me, you have no idea of my background, you don't know if I've ever even seen a 2012 Suzuki GV, you don't know if I have the slightest clue about motor vehicles - and this is true for every stranger with a keyboard.

Yes, you're going to need an extension, at least a six inch, you're also going to need a thin wall spark plug socket, most likely a 16mm, my preference is a magnetic socket, rather than the ones with the rubber inserts - the inserts will sometimes stay on the plug rather than stay in the socket.

You're going to need, I believe a 10mm socket to unbolt the coil packs - twist them before & whilst pulling upwards, the rubber boots have a way of bonding with the porcelain on the plugs and the twisting action helps break the bond - I like to use a light smear of dielectric grease on the plugs and the inside of the boots to reduce the possibility of tearing the boot. It may help to disconnect the wiring harness from the plug - the connector has a latch or lock that needs to be depressed.

Tightening - read the box the new plugs come in - there are different styles of plug and they require different "styles of tightening" - from memory - if it's a tapered seat plug (no washer) it's 1/16 turn, it it's a flat seat plug, it needs a crush washer (usually attached to the plug) and that gets tightened differently based on whether or not it's new or used - 1/3 turn - you can also find this on the plug manufacturers website.

Plug gap - most plugs now come "pre-gapped" from the factory, but it doesn't hurt to check them - if you're using the "high tech" plugs - iridium, platinum, etc., don't try to change the gap - don't drop the plug into the well as it may fall on the ground electrode and bend it, either insert it using the socket & extension or use a pickup tool.

For what it's worth - I'm not a mechanic by profession, I've been turning wrenches (or spinning spanners) for over four decades, I'll tackle anything short of an automatic transmission, and I've never seen under the hood of a 2012 Grand Vitara. I do most of my own work, except for when I get lazy or when I lack the tools - I'm not in a country where I can go rent a transmission jack, and bench pressing a transmission & transfer case into place is not my idea of a fun weekend job, so whilst I can and have changed clutches before, I no longer do that myself.

Go brave and holler if you need help.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Serious question here Andy - is this your first plug change? Go outside, open the hood (or bonnet if you prefer), remove the engine cover and take a look at what you have there - can you even see the plugs? Sometimes you're going to have to figure things out for yourself - youtube and the internet are not going to be there every time you need them, and they are both frequently incorrect & misleading - remember - you don't know me, you have no idea of my background, you don't know if I've ever even seen a 2012 Suzuki GV, you don't know if I have the slightest clue about motor vehicles - and this is true for every stranger with a keyboard.

Yes, you're going to need an extension, at least a six inch, you're also going to need a thin wall spark plug socket, most likely a 16mm, my preference is a magnetic socket, rather than the ones with the rubber inserts - the inserts will sometimes stay on the plug rather than stay in the socket.

You're going to need, I believe a 10mm socket to unbolt the coil packs - twist them before & whilst pulling upwards, the rubber boots have a way of bonding with the porcelain on the plugs and the twisting action helps break the bond - I like to use a light smear of dielectric grease on the plugs and the inside of the boots to reduce the possibility of tearing the boot. It may help to disconnect the wiring harness from the plug - the connector has a latch or lock that needs to be depressed.

Tightening - read the box the new plugs come in - there are different styles of plug and they require different "styles of tightening" - from memory - if it's a tapered seat plug (no washer) it's 1/16 turn, it it's a flat seat plug, it needs a crush washer (usually attached to the plug) and that gets tightened differently based on whether or not it's new or used - 1/3 turn - you can also find this on the plug manufacturers website.

Plug gap - most plugs now come "pre-gapped" from the factory, but it doesn't hurt to check them - if you're using the "high tech" plugs - iridium, platinum, etc., don't try to change the gap - don't drop the plug into the well as it may fall on the ground electrode and bend it, either insert it using the socket & extension or use a pickup tool.

For what it's worth - I'm not a mechanic by profession, I've been turning wrenches (or spinning spanners) for over four decades, I'll tackle anything short of an automatic transmission, and I've never seen under the hood of a 2012 Grand Vitara. I do most of my own work, except for when I get lazy or when I lack the tools - I'm not in a country where I can go rent a transmission jack, and bench pressing a transmission & transfer case into place is not my idea of a fun weekend job, so whilst I can and have changed clutches before, I no longer do that myself.

Go brave and holler if you need help.
Thank you very much for the detailed reply. I have changed a set of spark plugs once before. The primary reason I was asking is that I do not currently have many tools on hand so would need to purchase before doing the job. I don't want to get caught out purchasing the wrong tools as I'm on a tight budget. I will let you know how I go.
 

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My question was intended more to get you to think than anything else - sometimes you just gotta go look and figure things out yourself - it's often quicker than asking on the internet.

If you're serious about DIY maintenance, at some point, you're going to need a ratchet and a set of sockets, any decent set will come with both the sparkplug socket & the extensions, and I can tell you, from experience, that buying them as a set, is going to be less expensive than buying them separately.

A few years back, when ratchet wrenches first came out, I bought an inexpensive set and then discovered that it did not have all the sizes I wanted - I needed to buy one more to complete it - the price of that single wrench horrified me - it was actually less expensive to buy a second set of wrenches that included the size I needed, so now I have two sets, and the smaller set lives in a tool roll in the back of the car.
 

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If you need to purchase the tools, it's probably more cost effective to get your local garage to do the work.
 

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If you need to purchase the tools, it's probably more cost effective to get your local garage to do the work.
I dunno, $40 for a basic socket set that will do the job and $25 a plug vs $100 labour plus plugs. Your call
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I figured it out. $10 "T-bar 16mm spark plug socket tool" should work fine. I am currently a student who will be going on placements throughout Australia so need to keep my amount of "stuff" to a minimum. I do plan on getting a proper tool set when I know I am going to be in the same city for more than 6 months at a time.

Does anyone know how tight I should turn the spark plugs without a torque wrench? They are iridium gasket type. I read 2/3 of a turn after hand tight, but just want to clarify.
 

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"Snug" is a term i use, do them up hand tight then nip them from there. Idea is to crush the gasket to get a good seal and not to overtighten them and strip the thread in the head.
 
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The magnetic socket for the plugs would be a great idea. The plug hole is a long way in. I used a very strong magnetic tipped tool to feed the plug in and carefully turned it to get the thread started. This worked for me but magnetic would be better. The plug sockets with a rubber insert is one of those 'sounds great' ideas but a PITA. The rubber shrinks with time and use so defeats the purpose of using it.
Don't get me started on spanner and socket sets that come with just that 1 less item that seems to be the most useful you will need tool. I suspect that some manfs leave it out knowing you will buy that set because it is the cheapest only to get you later when you either try to buy a single tool or the next set up that has it. In saying that I often find that having two sets (full ones) is very useful, especially when you need a tool that has different ends on the one tool and you need them both at the same time. The spanner missing is one somewhere between about 13 -17mm.
 
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