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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all I was thinking of putting drop shackles 4inch to 8inch when open on my stock sierra what do people think of them love them hate them what do I have to do to put them on like brake lines shocks tail shaft spacers just wont to no what I would be getting into I like the idea of the lockable shackles I have looked around the net but not to much info on them and I in Australia so no spoa it suck and has anyone make them there self tell me what you think
 

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I have used the drop shackles from Rocky Road Outfitters and they work well for Samurai springs. I have since moved through a bunch of suspension changes and ended up doing the YJ conversion. The drop shackles that Trail Tough sells for that conversion are a bit nicer. Remember that just adding drop shackles don't finish the job, you also have to incorporate a shackle rest to get the job done right.
I like the drop shackles, especialy when doing rough rock gardens and trails that need tons of articulation. I prefer that the tires contact the ground as much as possible. The 'tire in the air' photo shot is great for the magazines, but not as great for the nerves during the more technical trails.

Here is an older, but still very informative article on drop shackles (Rocky Road calls them their 'missing link').
Missing Link
 

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Thinks billjohn can you have a look at these ones from Climax Suspension - Quality Suspension for 4WD and Car Owners - 4WD Suspension Climax Drop Shackles tell me what you think they seam different because you can lock them in for road driving and unlock them for hard core 4wd and my car is bit of a dally driver so I think it would be good
THOSE are some nice drop shackles. Three things I see that I like.

- The quality looks top notch. A closer inspection would be nice.
- The locking pins are a plus for those that overwork the steering or the brakes.
- They are designed to be self-supporting so that there is no need for a brace for them to rest against.

Go for it!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for having a look I was thinking of making them with a friend I am ok with fabrication work and he is a good welder would it be worth giving it a go or just save the cash up and pay $800 for front and back sets and that’s with out $400 worth of shocks to get full flex out of them its just a thought any seductions on how I no the size of most of it its just the thickness of metal it would take tell me what you think
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah worth it for 1 inch lift and 8 inch of drop down wheel travel but it cost $$$ alot thanks I am not to good with size of metal what is (grade 8)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks it big help didn’t under stand much but grade 8 is strong really strong like grand 5 brake before 8 is started when I make them I will put a pic on and if it work I will put spec on for everybody thanks billjohn
 

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Hay, this is a great thread that answers some of my questions. Aren't there any manufacturers in the US or UK that make those lockable drop shackles? Because this would solve the problem of unstable highway driving.
 

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newb question... what are drop shackles, and how much flex would they add to a stock sierra?...
A drop shackle gives a leaf-sprung vehicle the flexibility of a highly flexible coil-sprung vehicle. I don't think you can install it on a stock sierra; one thing for sure, you have to get rid of your anti-sway bar.
 

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yeah, the original question was about puting them on a stock vehicle and that answer is NO. A lot of people that have done modifications to their suspension and steering forget that when they ran the shackles, they may have had a few alterations that they forgot about.
15 years ago when I first did a suspension lift to clear the big tires I wanted to run, I put some 8" shackles on and nothing else. It flexed the front springs flat and it rode like a washboard. There was no travel up or down. The reason for no up travel is because the springs were flexed to their maximum since they were held flat. The reason for no down travel is because the rest of the suspension was restricting the springs from dropping lower. It would grab every crack and bump in the road and practically rip the wheel from my hands.... on paved roads. The steering was all over the place, the slightest twitch would send it careening one way or the other and driving a straight line was out of the question... it was like watching a moth taking a sobriety test.

Like Alternator said, you need to loose the stock anti sway bar. It pulls your axle and messes up your drive angle, making your steering as fidgetty as a squirrel on crack. You will need an anti sway bar though if you plan on driving at freeway speeds or if you like to take corners without rolling the rig over.
The shocks need to be replaced with extended shocks so that your axel can drop down and thus have room to travel back up. Extended shock mounts allow you even more articulation since you can run an even longer shock.
You need at the very least a drop pitman arm on your steering or your steering linkage will be out of alignment, causing further steering issues. Other options are high steer, and Z-link... the z-link is cursed by many, but I have no personal experience with it.
The little steering damper probably will not be adequate with larger tires and a lifted suspension. If you don't have a heavily modified steering linkage, your drag link will not be at an optimum angle, and If you aren't running a larger aftermarket damper, then invest in one. They're cheap and easy to install.
You already mentioned brake lines so yeah.. those!
Also an issue will be the length of the drive shaft. It has some room for expansion, but with a drop link shackle then you will be at the limit at probably beyond when it flexes. To keep your drive shaft from seperating, get an extended one. If you go with the drive shaft spacer, keep in mind that your U-joints will be worked a lot more from the harder angle that they need to take. A spacer moves the two universal joints closer together which makes the angle of the drive shaft even more extreme than it already is on such a short wheel based vehicle. So getting an extended drive shaft is much better for the U-joints which tend to be the weak point in your drive train.
 

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Hay, this is a great thread that answers some of my questions. Aren't there any manufacturers in the US or UK that make those lockable drop shackles? Because this would solve the problem of unstable highway driving.
My question still remains ... any US or UK vendor who makes lockable drop shackles?

Otherwise, is it easy to drill a hole in a standard drop shackle and insert a locking pin?
 

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Most drop shackles that I know of don't have a point where you can drive a bolt through the upper and lower shackles. they don't actually fold over onto one another. You would have to have to bolt a flange to one side that over laps the other, and you could do it that way I suppose.

Ok, looking at the superior drop shackle, they place the locking pin on the back of the hinge. You would still need an extended flange back there on any US made shackle that I know of. The superior and the Climax shackles are available from AU.
 

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Most drop shackles that I know of don't have a point where you can drive a bolt through the upper and lower shackles. they don't actually fold over onto one another. You would have to have to bolt a flange to one side that over laps the other, and you could do it that way I suppose.

Ok, looking at the superior drop shackle, they place the locking pin on the back of the hinge. You would still need an extended flange back there on any US made shackle that I know of. The superior and the Climax shackles are available from AU.
Just checked them out ... seem to be better engineered than American ones. But man aren't Australians expensive! A pair of drop shackles for AU$599!
 

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I KNOW! apparently fabrication is pretty expensive down under. A lot of places down there don't let you even drive a vehicle on road with modifications to the suspension. If that were the case here in the U.S. we would loose about half of our offroad comunity. A lot of us don't have dedicated trail rigs and taking a stocker off road isn't much fun....

You can contact the people at SKY manufacturing, they may be able to fab you something for a lot less. Those guys make really capable components and do good work.
 

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Just checked them out ... seem to be better engineered than American ones. But man aren't Australians expensive! A pair of drop shackles for AU$599!
There are expensive ones here in the US also... do a search for Revolver Shackles... I ran them for many years and loved them but they ran about $200 a pair.
 

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Hi Bill,

Welcome back. I saw your article about revolver shackles. Unfortunately they are making them only for Jeeps now, from my understanding :(

But still, $200 is a fraction of the Australian price.
 

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Hi Bill,

Welcome back. I saw your article about revolver shackles. Unfortunately they are making them only for Jeeps now, from my understanding :(
Not exactly.
Remember the threads where I talked about the CJ front leaf pack as being the same width as the Samurai packs? It is what you use in back when you go RUF up front. Guess what you order... ;)

CJ Front Revolver Shackle Jeep - Sam's Price $199.95 (per pair)
Sam's 4x4 Store
 
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