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I recently purchased a samurai that has a Calmini lift on it. I'm not sure exactly what size lift either a 3" or 5" I'm guessing (what two reference points would you use to measure the exact lift?). I noticed a bump when releasing the clutch and narrowed it down to the drive shaft u-joint bearings. They were totally shot on the rear drive shaft. While I was under there I also realized that whoever installed the Calmini lift put both aluminum drive shaft spacers on the front drive shaft. I would have thought that there should be one drive shaft spacer on the front drive shaft and one drive shaft spacer on the rear drive shaft. Is this correct? If so should the spacers be between the differential and the drive shaft or between the transfer case and the drive shaft? Also, I noticed the two spacers were slightly different in thickness. I didn't measure them but one is definitely larger. Should the thicker one go on the back or the front? I'm hoping someone with some experience with this lift can help me put this back together properly.

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I have heard good things about Calmini, I would contact them for specifics, they should be able to clarify that quickly. I do know that with a lifted Samurai the driveline angle gets critical pretty quick in part due to the short wheel base. If the pinion angles are set correctly it should be fairly smooth but U-joints wont last forever. I have had good luck with the Spicer joints, the last one lasted me 2 years with quite a bit of street driving. I just replaced it with another brand and it sucks, Going back to a Spicer joint.

If you still have Samurai axles then you can either set the flanges parallel to each other with a single joint on each end and that should be pretty good. I have seen more people use a double cardon up front and set the rear flange aiming directly at the rear transfer case flange using leaf shims. I find I have to grease the U-joints frequently, with the angle they dont seem to keep the grease as long as they otherwise would.

With Toyota axles I have a compound angle so I had to use the first method and it works surprisingly well. I would prefer the second method if possible though. I see this posted several days back so I hope you got your answers and got it sorted out.
 
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