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Discussion Starter #1
hi fellas...i have currently a stock battery on my jimny (small battery).
if i install a higher capacity battery (say a 200 mAh) to power all my gadgets (engine is ON during usage)....do i need to upgrade my Alternator to fully charge this battery? :)
 

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200 mah is not a very large capacity battery. My AA batteries in my penlight are 2000 mah. if it's low demand stuff, then you shouldn't need another alternator if the batteries are wired in paralell. If you have a large current draw on the second battery then you may need a stronger alternator. What kind of load are you talking about?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
sorry for the confusion Baratacus... i meant to say 200 Ah battery.
i am thinking to replace the stock battery (i have to check the Ah...but i assume it is low, since the battery is so small), with the 200 Ah battery.
can my stock alternator fully charge the 200 Ah battery after replacing the stock battery?
 

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I think you really should focus the discussion into the one thread - your other thread - whether or not the stock alternator can charge the 200Ah battery will depend on three things - first, the state of charge of the battery (how empty/full it is), the output of the alternator, and how long you'll be driving for.

Additionally - the vehicle load should be considered - five hours of daytime driving will probably provide more charge than five hours of night time driving because more of the alternator's output is utilized by vehicle loads.

Generally speaking most stock alternators can handle larger batteries.

Back in the late '80's, I was with an alternate energy firm and we spent some time experimenting with vehicle based lighting systems - we'd fit a second battery in the back of the vehicle and connect it to the standard charge system using a diode type isolator (this allows charging only) and then every night plug 12V DC fluorescent lamps into the second battery and run them for lighting - although the system output does depend heavily on vehicle usage, we never ran into charge issues, either on the starting battery or the lighting system battery.

The system worked quite well but is suitable only for small loads - two or three lights in a mountain or backwoods cabin type deal.

Back then vehicles had smaller alternators and the most efficent consumer lighting was fluoresecents, now relatively high output white LEDs are available making it a lot easier to light your cabin.
 
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