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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read here a while ago, that our crank pulleys, in time, the rubber part between belt rings tends to loose strength and mark on pulley drifts away from crank keyway hole facing 12pm.

Out of curiosity, I inspected my original pulley which suffer that same fate last year, and definitely it was just like that, offset. I dealt with pulley mark, dancing a bit form belt cover mark while doing ignition timing. Maybe it was due to this fact. Crank was bolted a 94ft/pounds so loosened was not an issue. Wonder if my aftermarket one in such a short time is already suffering from this.

Will aligning them back and giving them small welding points in the back in a cross pattern fix this?

Has anyone here discovered this?

Here some pics showing how the pulley mark drifted away.

Cheers!!


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yeah that one is off. should be straight up from my experience. I dont know about welding it, if it heat warps just a tad the balance would be off. low range off road makes a solid aluminum replacement pretty cheap
 

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Welding the cast base metal will be iffy at best. Plus the probable perimeter run-out imposed by the attempted fix. I'd replace anew.
 

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The other name for the crank pulley is "harmonic balancer", and the rubber is there for a reason, to damp the vibrations, welding the two pieces together will defeat that purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The other name for the crank pulley is "harmonic balancer", and the rubber is there for a reason, to damp the vibrations, welding the two pieces together will defeat that purpose.
Oki, so the all in 1 piece "Harmonic balancer" that user suggested would be a good idea, even though its missing the rubber? My Civic 87 is also a one piece HB, with an engine that roughly produces 76HP. Im saying this cause maybe the rubber is better suited for more powerful engines?
 

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Hmmmmn not applicable to the 1.8 liter?
So I take it that the pulley is a two piece press fit with rubber bushing between? Do I start fretting over my 1.8 now or is this a common problem on 1.6 only?
 

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Its a common problem on any harmonic balancer that uses a rubber sandwich. They are like engine mounts, some last years, some last a few months before they fail
 

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Oki, so the all in 1 piece "Harmonic balancer" that user suggested would be a good idea, even though its missing the rubber? My Civic 87 is also a one piece HB, with an engine that roughly produces 76HP. Im saying this cause maybe the rubber is better suited for more powerful engines?
That's more of an engineering decision that's beyond my technical abilities - there are design factors that need to be considered, engine configuration (vee or in-line), number of cylinders, bore/stroke ratio, and yes I understand you're comparing two in-line four cylinder engines - I've had 2.0 liter four cylinder in-line engines that had balance shafts, and 2.0 four cylinder in-line engines that didn't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That's more of an engineering decision that's beyond my technical abilities - there are design factors that need to be considered, engine configuration (vee or in-line), number of cylinders, bore/stroke ratio, and yes I understand you're comparing two in-line four cylinder engines - I've had 2.0 liter four cylinder in-line engines that had balance shafts, and 2.0 four cylinder in-line engines that didn't.
So maybe its a design choice by the engineer due to the different factors that you mention. My car year, which I forgot, is Carb, but I think FI HB for those same years, were the rubber sandwich type, if Im not mistaken and for sure from 1988 on.
 

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My '98's pulley (harmonic balancer) was a mess when I bought the rig four years ago. I replaced it with Low Range's aluminum one, and the only problem I had was trying to run a cheap serpentine belt. The slippery aluminum didn't have the traction that the semi-rusty iron did. Finally bought the most expensive serpentine I could find--a $20 Continental belt as I recall.

Hmmm....going to replace the timing belt on another '98 that I just bought. Maybe it would be a good idea to replace the harmonic balancer, too, as long as I'm that deep into it. Any part that is over 20 years old and contains rubber is probably a maintenance item.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Its a common problem on any harmonic balancer that uses a rubber sandwich. They are like engine mounts, some last years, some last a few months before they fail
Well, thinking this is contributing to my problem, my 1 year old balancer, I think went south. Time to look for a new one.
 

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Well, thinking this is contributing to my problem, my 1 year old balancer, I think went south. Time to look for a new one.
See post #3 above.
 

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There's a discussion on harmonic balancers in this video that might be of interest to the folks asking about the use of one piece crankshaft pulleys.
 
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There's a discussion on harmonic balancers in this video that might be of interest to the folks asking about the use of one piece crankshaft pulleys.
Well, that does it. I won't be building mine to 500 hp.

I do recall reading about the harmonics in straight six engines some 50 years ago. Apparently, straight sixes are particularly susceptible to RPMs of destruction. As I recall, all but Jaguars and my stovebolt Chevy simply didn't rev high enough to hit the destructive RPM range. In Jags and Chevs, you drove right through it, like the Hayabusa in the video. Never heard of the issue in inline fours but am interested in knowing more.

Anybody know what the destructive rev range is for the 1.6L? All I know is I've been running a Low Range pulley for four years now (about 15,000 miles) in town and at freeway speeds without any known issues. Just bought a second one for my second 1.6. Unlike my first rig ('98 Sidekick 2WD with no accessories) my second rig ('98 Tracker 4x4, 4-door) is loaded with power steering, A/C, and all kinds of bells and whistles. It'll be interesting to see if there is a difference.
 

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Its not so much the destruction point, its the harmonic frequency that causes work hardening or fatigue cracking over time. Straight 4, 6 and some V engine depending on angle and cylinder config suffer from this. 4 cyl are by far the worst. Replacing a rubberised balancer with a solid pulley won't kill the engine immediately but it will shorten its life. If you're doing higher hp and revving then it will become a factor too. My old school Chevy 350 V8 is now solid pulley but you need to see the balancing done on the crank and rotating mass to allow it to rev to 7,000, factory harmonic balancer on that engine was only good to about 5800
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So that means that my one piece 4cyl Civic 87 harmonic balancer must have come balanced for factory, not for a high power engine (only 76hp) and maybe cause is carburated?
 

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4 cyl are by far the worst. Replacing a rubberised balancer with a solid pulley won't kill the engine immediately but it will shorten its life.
Well, that's a buzzkill. What's your opinion--given a choice between a 20+ year old rubberized balancer (85k miles) or a one-piece aluminum replacement, which would you choose if you were, say, going to drive across the country?
 

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Solid pulley and dont thrash it, its not going to die overnight, but it will feel "buzzy" at certain rev points, avoid prolonged operation at those spots. Unfortunately I bet those buzzing points will be where you want to drive it.

I ran a 4G63 mitzi motor with no balance shafts for 160,000 kms (100k miles) and it was showing signs of stress cracking in the bearing girdle when I pulled it down
 
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