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Discussion Starter #1
So overall I've HEARD that Cold Air Intakes help HP and or MPG or one or the either.
My question is this,
are there cold air intakes for Geo Trackers/Suzuki Sidekicks?
are there any notable differences?

OR
is it better to make the OEM air box into a "cold air intake" by running a hose from the grill/outside to it?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Or would upgrading the exhaust help more?
 

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Cold air intake wont do much for power. unless you use your trackick at WOT all the time (the throttle blade will restrict some flow all the time except at WOT). i find that my sportkick already has one :eek:! the factory intake on mine draws air from the inner fender OUTSIDE the engine bay. I don't know if anyone makes one for the 1.6L but i say the factory intake is just fine. if you want to upgrade power and fuel efficiency the only way to go is upgrade the exhaust.

I did it on my sport-kick and it really woke my 1.8L right up (it will also work on the 1.6). less restrictive exhaust means better breathing, means more efficient operation = better fuel efficiency and better power output. and it sounds great too ;). although one thing you should know, you will NOT see any gains in fuel efficiency if you drive more lead footed after the exhaust gets put on LOL.
 

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x2 on what Mario said. Most aftermarket "cold" intakes actually are intaking air from under the hood. Also the filters used on these are not very good for removing dust... adding to piston ring wear and dirty oil. (Send an oil sample in before and after the modifications.)

The OEM system is large enough for the requirements of the motor (unless flat out racing) and is designed to remove any water that finds its way into the intake when off-roading. Splashed in while fording shallow streams and the like.

Upgrading the exhaust would be better. But there isn't THAT much power to be found even there. Going too big will reduce flow velocity... reducing scavenging and in the end... less torque. (And torque is more important than horse power unless running flat out.)
 

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A broken record: check your timing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
A broken record: check your timing.
Timing is fine, I'm just used to bigger more powerful cars, just new to this one lol didn't know if there were any mods or what to pump it up a little or not.

I am thinking of new headers on down the road after I replace the transmission (it's got 181K on it and I'd like to learn how to rebuild this trans and get more life out of the car) but anyways slowly turning it into a life size micro machine gradually.
 

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these motors dont make much power just so you know. but getting a properly sized exhaust can help with throttle response and power all around. the thing is not many companies make exhausts for these so you will have to go to a muffler shop to get one made for your tracker. a 2 inch system should be just right, that is what i am running on my 1.8, I also have a magnaflow muffler as well and its great.
 

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I dont like the long tube headers I have, as the sacrifice tons of top end for minimal low end gains.

2.25 exhaust with a high flow cat and magnaflow works well.

Did the 2 inch piping on the wife's rig instead...and it just drones at 3k rpm. Annoying.

Her rig scoots along pretty good on 235s though.
 

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My 2c, you should stick to fixing the basics before you dream of spending $$ (which you stated you did not have)....

... Philip
 

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If your rig isn't keeping up with traffic, there is something wrong with it. While these rigs do not have much power, they also do not weigh much, so performance shouldn't be worse than the average car on the road. They are a few years old, so it is quite likely that it isn't fully up to stock performance standards.

If you want to go faster than traffic, up hills and grades.. or pull heavy loads... then you might want to look into upgrades. Use a little common sense before throwing money at it... you'll be happier in the end.

For example: If your exhaust need replacing, look into a slightly larger system... but do not replace a system that doesn't need it.

OBTW: How do you know "Timing is fine" ???
 

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OBTW: How do you know "Timing is fine" ???
x2. On your past post you ask how to do a compression test, and was advised how to do it. You cannot start fiddling around with anything, if you don't have the confirmation of good timing in your car. You think the car is in 'limp home' can't get out of its own way, etc. There really is little choice other than to do the compression test, frankly. You can put as many additions on to your car as you like - exhaust, new intake, whatever, but if your car isn't timed properly, it will all be meaningless. Your choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If your rig isn't keeping up with traffic, there is something wrong with it. While these rigs do not have much power, they also do not weigh much, so performance shouldn't be worse than the average car on the road. They are a few years old, so it is quite likely that it isn't fully up to stock performance standards.

If you want to go faster than traffic, up hills and grades.. or pull heavy loads... then you might want to look into upgrades. Use a little common sense before throwing money at it... you'll be happier in the end.

For example: If your exhaust need replacing, look into a slightly larger system... but do not replace a system that doesn't need it.

OBTW: How do you know "Timing is fine" ???
well, the as I stated in a different thread because I THOUGHT it was in limp home mode (which I have never heard of until owning this car) but it just needed the right rotor on it and a tune up all of which I got the majority done except new oil and new fuel filter and air filter (which I think might be causing the rough idle at the moment since that's what it feels like and no one has a damned OBD 1 scanner anymore)
the only other problems I can tell are the trans is going (it's got 181 k on it I'm not surprised and it looks like the trans has seen some offroading) that or it needs a tune up via gasket/filter which if I can find the damned risers I'll be doing that tomorrow and pouring some sweet goopy trans fluid in it and the steering shaft which I found a dude willing to sell me 2 of them for 50$ a piece problem is one is from a 94 manual steering and the other a 96 power steering and I want to convert mine to manual steering easily and don't know if the 96's will fit my 95 or if the 94 will.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
like everyone is telling you, cai's do nothing
thank you!
I was just looking into it as an idea if it was even an idea worth looking into.
And I have troubles with cars, I just chalk it up to learning and make the car mine essentially. So far this one has the least problems, I just wish I had a slab of concrete so I could work more easily instead of gravel :|
 

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no one has a damned OBD 1 scanner anymore)
Certainly you can find a metal paper clip somewhere. If your check engine light is on with the key on and off once the car starts, it should be fine. If it is on while the car is running, you just use a jumper wire or metal paperclip to jump the diagnostic connector by the battery. No big deal. However, if you want a scanner for your car - check out Rhino's website - he sells hardware and a computer program which you put into your laptop which will allow your computer to give out info just like an OBD2 car.
Finding codes with the jumper is explained here:
Check Engine Light
Or search his site for the cables and program.

And you still need to do a compression test. It is easy, takes 2 minutes, and will confirm that your car is timed correctly. I don't understand why you hesitate to do this??
You just pull the F1 fuse in your car, remove all spark plugs, put the compression tester in cylinder #1, crank the car with the gas pedal floored to about 5 cranks, and write down the number. On to cylinder #2. Easy.

And maybe a mat over the gravel will save your back a bit??
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Certainly you can find a metal paper clip somewhere. If your check engine light is on with the key on and off once the car starts, it should be fine. If it is on while the car is running, you just use a jumper wire or metal paperclip to jump the diagnostic connector by the battery. No big deal. However, if you want a scanner for your car - check out Rhino's website - he sells hardware and a computer program which you put into your laptop which will allow your computer to give out info just like an OBD2 car.
Finding codes with the jumper is explained here:
Check Engine Light
Or search his site for the cables and program.

And you still need to do a compression test. It is easy, takes 2 minutes, and will confirm that your car is timed correctly. I don't understand why you hesitate to do this??
You just pull the F1 fuse in your car, remove all spark plugs, put the compression tester in cylinder #1, crank the car with the gas pedal floored to about 5 cranks, and write down the number. On to cylinder #2. Easy.

And maybe a mat over the gravel will save your back a bit??
I hesitate on the compression test because I don't have a way to monitor the compression unless you do it via RPM or something.
And I tried the mat thing, I live in the boonies and my yard is a constant bog, I learned my lesson on jacking up cars and simply changing a tire on my old ford explorer and it came crashing down and almost took my hand because it sank a little and slipped.

don't exactly want this crushing anything on me lol
 

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I hesitate on the compression test because I don't have a way to monitor the compression unless you do it via RPM or something.
And I tried the mat thing, I live in the boonies and my yard is a constant bog, I learned my lesson on jacking up cars and simply changing a tire on my old ford explorer and it came crashing down and almost took my hand because it sank a little and slipped.

don't exactly want this crushing anything on me lol
Compression testers hold the highest pressure until they're released. No need to monitor anything, just write down the value obtained for each cylinder after you crank the engine. Best done on a hot engine, but it can be done when it's cold.
 

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I hesitate on the compression test because I don't have a way to monitor the compression unless you do it via RPM or something.

You just need a compression gauge. There is no monitoring. If you want your car running properly, it is sensible to do this test. It's easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
You just need a compression gauge. There is no monitoring. If you want your car running properly, it is sensible to do this test. It's easy.
I'll pick one up when I have the money, how do I hook it up to the engine?

Also, just got the awesome crack in the manifold :|
ordered a new one though, lifetime warranties FTW
 

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drive it like you stole it. happy higher rpm motor. the 1.6 8v and the 1.6 16v both love high rpm. hell even the 2.5 in my 2000 is well over 3k rpm on the highway. i think it needs another gear. or a 2 speed driveshaft. how bad ass would that be. have a 10 speed vehicle
 
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